Archive
2005 Yearly archive
License Plates, now with more Skulls! (Mar, 1939)

I want a skull on my license plate! I also love the girls expression.

Special License Plates Tag Careless Drivers

Special license plates for traffic violators are being considered as a safety measure by Cliff Davis, commissioner of public safety in Memphis, Tenn. If the measure is adopted motorists who persistently break traffic laws will be required to run in their regular licence plates for special tags, similar to that shown in the photograph above, bearing a skull and the words “traffic-law violator.”

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Spinning Head Tapes TV at Home (Jan, 1965)

Spinning Head Tapes TV at Home
Is this the year you mate a home TV tape recorder to your TV set? Two European electronics firms – Philips (Netherlands) and Loewe-Opta (West Germany) are now selling TV recorders specially designed for home use. Both will be available here in a few months.

To capture the details of a TV picture, the recorder must have a three-megacycle recording bandwidth. Earlier prototype home TV recorders were essentially scaled-up audio recorders: They achieved wide bandwidth by moving 1/4-inch-wide audio-type tape past a stationary recording head at high speed (usually 120 inches per second). High tape speed leads to excessive head and tape wear, and gobbles up tape at an uneconomical rate.
Both the Philips and Loewe-Opta recorders use one-inch-wide video-recording tape and a rotating recording head. The tape is threaded in a single spiral around a slotted drum that contains a spinning recording head rotating at about 3,000 r.p.m. Tape speed around the drum is about six inches a second. The rotating head records the TV picture signal on adjacent diagonal bands on the tape. The audio is recorded along the edge of the tape.
Both units are expensive-over $2,000 with accessories-but cost should drop as sales rise.

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Zipper Gas Mask Made for Babies (May, 1934)

Zipper Gas Mask Made for Babies
A special handbag for carrying babies furnishes protection in case of a war-time gas attack. An oxygen tank begins to function as soon as the zipper cover is closed, supplying air to the baby.

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Pump Your Own Gas (Dec, 1939)

Pump Your Own Gas
If you’ve ever run out of gas late at night when gas stations were closed, you’ll appreciate this latest wrinkle in gasoline dispensing – the “Gasoteria”. The motorist drops coins into slots in the tank and may deliver gas directly into his car without the aid of an attendant. Should the tank be empty his money is returned automatically.

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Raise Giant Frogs (Jan, 1936)

Friday Animals for Profit blogging, teaching you how to turn frogs into cold, hard cash!

Update: Bryans Basement also has a similar ad, I see we share a love of animals for profit blogging.

Raise Giant Frogs

A New, Uncrowded Industry

Good Profits – No Competition
Each pair of “Nufond Giant” breeders lay 10,000 eggs every year. With modern methods, up to 90% turn into frogs.
Giant frogs sell up to $5.00 per dozen everywhere. Think of the profit possibilities! Competition is unknown because the wild supply is practically exhausted.

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Next Month… How to Choose a Geiger Counter (Dec, 1955)

Next Month… How to Choose a Geiger Counter
THINKING of buying a Geiger counter for uranium hunting? Which of the dozens that are on the market, with all kinds of gadgets and price tags, will serve you best? In the January issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, an article on how to choose a Geiger counter will offer expert advice to guide you when you go shopping. From practical experience the author, Griff Borgeson, compares the features of current models and tells which are most desirable-and why.

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Early Airbags (May, 1968)

Pillow protects you in auto crashes
This “Auto-Ceptor” pillow is designed to prevent or lessen injuries in car accidents. Triggered by a crash sensor. it inflates in 1/25 second between the instrument panel and the driver and passenger. A model and dummy child demonstrate it here. It’s a joint product of two companies: Eaton Yale & Towne and the Ford Motor Co.

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Tax Return Spelunking (Jul, 1952)

Cap Lights Illuminate Warehouse
Office employees at a Government warehouse in Chicago look more like miners than clerks. The warehouse is used to store Government records. Instead of going to the expense of installing a new lighting system which would have cost an estimated $20,000, officials have provided cap lights for the clerks who search through the records. The lights are operated by rechargeable batteries and provide more than adequate illumination.

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Transistor Pocket Radio (Jan, 1955)

Transistor Pocket Radio
THERE ARE NO vacuum tubes employed in this transistor pocket radio recently introduced by Regency of Indianapolis, Ind. It is claimed to be several years ahead of the time set by many stereatronics experts for the development of such a unit for consumer use.
This model, TR-l, is priced at $49.95 and comes in four colors: Black, bone white, cloud white and mandarin red. It measures 3 by 5 by 1.25 inches and weighs less than 12 ounces. Its size is, of course, made possible by the use of tiny high-performance transistors. A miniature 22.5-volt battery supplies the power for the radio.

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Hang your kids out the window (Aug, 1953)

This is completely insane.

Apartment-Window Cage Protects English Tots
Enclosed in a wire cage suspended from an apartment window, English children play in the sunlight and fresh air while their mothers are busy with housework. The cage, made of wire netting is strongly braced and is guarded on the apartment side by a cloth net which prevents children from crawling back into the room. Loaned by an infant welfare center to families with no gardens, the portable balcony is apparently popular with children and mothers. The demand exceeds the supply.

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