Archive
April, 2006 Monthly archive
PEACE MAKER (Jun, 1956)

PEACE MAKER
They called this weapon the Peacemaker. In the hands of the Western lawmen, it brought peace and order to the turbulent frontier.
In the West today, Sandia Corporation engineers and scientists explore new frontiers in research and development engineering to produce modern peacemakers . . . the nuclear weapons that deter aggression and provide a vital element of security for the nations of the free world.

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THE HIGHEST PRICED BEARING IN THE WORLD (Jun, 1930)

I think their marketing department might want to rethink this slogan. Perhaps “the best” or “highest quality” might serve them better.

149 SKF BEARINGS
are on this, the Largest Airplane in the World
NO time to think about bearings … not when the altimeter registers ten thousand feet… not when a hundred trusting passengers are dozing in their seats behind.
No time to wish that the bearings had been purchased upon performance rather than upon price… not when the twelve roaring motors on the wing will continue to roar only so long as the bearings stand up … nor when the twenty-four engine generators are running on them, and lighting dynamo, radio installation and fuel pump depend upon them.

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TV TRICKERY (Jan, 1958)

When a man-size spider walks a giant web, when scissors draw the villain’s blood or a lobster spits in the waiter’s eye, put it down to

TV TRICKERY

SEATED AT A SIDEWALK TABLE in a Paris cafe, a customer watched in fascination a huge, freshly cooked lobster placed in front of him by the waiter. Each time he reached for the lobster the huge shellfish swiftly moved its large claws protectingly over its head. Reaching for a hammer, the would-be diner attempted to hit the lobster but each time the claws parried the blow. The man finally called the waiter to see what he could do with the reluctant lobster. As the waiter bent over to inspect the lobster and its strange actions more closely a stream of water hit him in the eye.

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How THREE COLOR MOVIES ARE MADE (Jul, 1935)

How THREE COLOR MOVIES ARE MADE

WOULD you like to know how the color in a Walt Disney Silly Symphony or in “La Cucaracha” is obtained? Have you ever wondered how a motion picture film, in which each picture is about the size of a postage stamp, is colored so it can be magnified 35,000 or more times and still retain the beautiful coloring of a Silly Symphony?

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Ad: Magic Carpet (Jan, 1953)

The plane that helped win the war now helps win the peace
—the Douglas C-54
Last August nearly 4,000 Moslem pilgrims bound for Mecca were stranded in Beirut 800 miles from the holy city.

In one of the finest demonstrations of international good will, the Department of Defense provided a “magic carpet” in the form of the Military Air Transport Service to speed these pilgrims on their way.

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Device Measures Musical Talent (Apr, 1935)

Device Measures Musical Talent
A YARDSTICK for the measurement of musical talent, an automatic tone-variator, is now being used at Northwestern University to determine students’ ability to determine exact tonal pitch.
The machine contains 14 tuning-forks, set within one-quarter tone of each other. Two notes are struck in quick succession, and the students are asked which note was higher. Those that can detect the higher note consistently are keenly encouraged to study music. They are considered to be musically apt and talented.
Students with less sensitivity to tone are advised to study instruments with broader tone distinctions such as pianos and other keyboard instruments.

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Telephone Device Audibly Announces Exact Time (Apr, 1934)

Telephone Device Audibly Announces Exact Time
DESIGNED primarily to reply to thousands of daily requests received by telephone exchanges for the correct time, a machine invented by John W. Wells, of Stockton, Calif., audibly announces the exact time at three second intervals. The device uses less than 20 feet of movie film to record a 24-hour cycle of hours and minutes.
The sound waves are transformed from the film by a scanning optic and a photo-electric cell which travels the length of the film and returns every six seconds. The time is announced in hours and minutes at every trip of the scanning unit.

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Ad: Electronic “brains” rely on COPPER! (Nov, 1956)

Electronic “brains” rely on COPPER!
Today, electronic computers pre-test the performance of guided missiles . . . forecast next year’s sales . . . build safer bridges . . . and guide 5,000 freight cars a day through the mazes of 65 trunk lines in a single railroad yard.
You simply dial your instructions to these modern computers; they obey faster than thought.
But they need copper to operate.
Like nerves to the human head, copper wires transmit impulses to and from electronic “brains”. Other vital computer parts are of copper, too.
Perhaps your product doesn’t need to “think” . . . just act. Make it of copper and you make sure of performance no substitute can equal.
COPPER & BRASS
RESEARCH! ASSOCIATION
420 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, N.Y.
… AN INDUSTRY SOURCE OF TECHNOLOGICAL AID. INCLUDING A LIBRARY OF TECHNICAL LITERATURE AND A COUNCIL OF SPECIALISTS
COPPER OR ITS ALLOYS PROVIDE THESE ADVANTAGES:

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FOUND — King Solomon’s Gold Mines (Jul, 1936)

This is pretty rediculous. I particularly like the part about living in 167 degree heat.

FOUND — King Solomon’s Gold Mines

THE SECRET OF WAR-TORN ETHIOPIA
by JAMES NEVIN MILLER

COUNT BYRON DE PROROK, famous explorer, is again back in the United States after a series of adventures that would make an Arabian Nights fable seem weak and colorless in comparison. He was successful in locating the exact spot where the legendary King Solomon of Biblical fame once mined fabulous tons of gold.

More important, and perhaps the reason for the Italian hosts pushing their way into Ethiopia, these ancient mines are being worked today on a scale that staggers the imagination. From a volcanic mountain top, de Prorok beheld countless slaves, both men and women, toiling night and day to uncover the heavy golden nuggets.

But let this distinguished archaeologist tell his own almost unbelievable story:

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Even Baby Buggy Is Streamlined (Jul, 1935)

Even Baby Buggy Is Streamlined
STREAMLINING, which has invaded the automotive industry and revolutionized railroad design, has at last been felt by the manufacturers of baby carriages. A stormproof, streamlined perambulator recently was exhibited at an industrial fair in London.

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