Archive
August, 2006 Monthly archive
CARTOON Your Way to POPULARITY and PROFIT (Jan, 1946)

CARTOON Your Way to POPULARITY and PROFIT

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Huge Bulb Holds Kneeling Girl (Nov, 1934)

Huge Bulb Holds Kneeling Girl
BUILT as a laboratory exhibit, a mammoth lamp bulb, weighing 50 pounds and standing 56 inches high, is large enough to accommodate a kneeling girl.

When exhausted, to create a vacuum within, the quarter-inch walls must withstand a crushing strain of 40,000 pound:; and a tremendous temperature generated by incandescent tungsten wire thicker than a fountain pen.

The filament of this giant lamp would operate at perhaps half the temperature of the sun’s atmosphere, equivalent to an energy of 135 horsepower. To conserve this heat the bulb is filled with 200 quarts of a rather rare gas called argon.

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Water Sports Fans Race in Novel Hand – Powered Craft (Dec, 1931)

10-15 mph? That seems like it would be pretty impractical. Especially since your body would have to remain near vertical when you were cranking away…

Water Sports Fans Race in Novel Hand – Powered Craft

THE newest water sport in Berlin swimming pools is handicap racing with the recently-introduced “grinding wheel” boat weighing but six pounds and measuring a yard in length. On the water speedway the racer places his head and arms in the openings as shown in the accompanying photo and proceeds to grind away toward the goal.

The cranks of this unique racing boat are connected through what looks like a grindstone to the propeller blades in the rear, which drives the craft forward at a speed sometimes as high as 10 and 15 miles per hour.

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Some JAP SWORDS are Good (Aug, 1946)

Some JAP SWORDS are Good

GIs brought back many kinds; here’s how to tell the best

By DAN OTA

IN PREWAR Japan a foreigner found it easier to purchase a rare gem than a genuine antique Nippon-to, traditional two-handed sword. For the past 40 years, especially, it had symbolized intense Japanese nationalism. Today thousands of these swords have been brought to the United States by veterans from the Pacific. But only a few of the new owners know that their souvenirs were once bought and sold for prices up to $10,000 apiece.

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Mechanical Secrets of Movie Gorillas (Nov, 1933)

This magazine was published the same year King Kong was released. I wonder if this is one of the masks from the movie?

Mechanical Secrets of Movie Gorillas

EVER wonder how a Hollywood make-up man converts an actor into a terrifying-ly realistic gorilla in those fascinating jungle pictures you watch on the silver screen?

A study of the photos above will give you an idea of what goes on behind a gorilla face. Mechanics have devised a set of mechanical facial bones and muscles which act as the skeleton for a leather “skin” which make-up men put on.

A simple set of levers on the mechanism and a strip clamping over the lower teeth enable the actor to open and close his huge gorilla jaws like the real beast of the jungle. A special strap over the eyes gives the beetle browed effect.

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Intricate “What-Is-It” Gathers Cushion Data (Oct, 1940)

This looks like it should be in a Dr. Seuss book.

Intricate “What-Is-It” Gathers Cushion Data
NO, it’s not a car of the future; nor the past either. The strange-looking contraption in which the young woman seems to be going for a drive is designed to gather information for engineers. Installed at the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, where thousands of persons have sat in it, the apparatus was built for a cushion manufacturer who hopes from countless measurements made on it to obtain an average-size automobile-seat cushion that will be comfortable for the majority of motorists.

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Mechanical Radio Man Talks, Sings, Walks, and Rolls Eyes (Nov, 1932)

Mechanical Radio Man Talks, Sings, Walks, and Rolls Eyes

A YOUNG engineer in Berlin, after four years of work, has just perfected what is the strangest type of man ever to appear on this earth. The thing, shown in the photo at the left, outdoes Frankenstein in everything save looks. So perfect is it mechanically that it can move its lips, eyes, hands, legs, and even wag its ears.

Directions from the monitor are projected into the “brains” of the mechanical man by radio waves. Perfect synchronism makes it possible for the man to speak and gesture at the same time, so that as an attention-getting advertisement it works well. The brains of the “man” are a super-sensitive radio receiving set.

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WWII POWs get a Disney Designed Insignia (May, 1945)

DRY YANKEE HUMOR is puzzling guards at a German base prison camp for Allied airmen, since American POW’s there decided to adopt insignia to show their new status. The postcard below, sent by Capt. Robert H. Bishop, a bomber navigator now at the camp, brought the design at the right from the Walt Disney studios to Germany, via the Red Cross.

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House Boat Is an Old Oil Tank (Jun, 1939)

House Boat Is an Old Oil Tank
Made from an old 20,000-gallon oil tank, an unusual four-ton house boat built by Rene Tatro, of Kankakee, Ill., skims along the water at almost ten miles an hour. Powered by an old automobile engine, the curious craft has twin propellers and is balanced by five steel drums below the water level. Windows were cut out with an acetylene torch.

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New Crimped Shotgun Shells (Jul, 1939)

I *think* this is how all shotgun shells are made now…

New Shotgun Shell Aids Skeet Shooters
TRAPSHOOTERS and skeet enthusiasts should improve their scores with the use of a new shotgun shell that is said to eliminate the possibility of fired shot forming a “doughnut” pattern that could encircle a clay target without breaking it. Highspeed photographs like the two at the upper right, taken by the light of a 1/1,000,000-second spark, proved that the top wad at the end of conventional shells occasionally interferes with the charge, causing the inefficient “doughnut” shot pattern. The new shells have no top wad, the open shell mouth being crimped together by a special machine to confine the shot. When fired, the shell mouth unfolds, leaving nothing to obstruct the charge.

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