Archive
March, 2007 Monthly archive
Motorcycle Cops Show How to Ride ‘Em (Jan, 1948)

Motorcycle Cops Show How to Ride ‘Em

By Tom Cameron

IF YOU’RE learning to ride a motorcycle, the policemen who patrol your streets and highways could give you some valuable pointers. Chances are these men are just about the best rider? in the community. Because of the nature of their work they have to be. And it’s likely this ability was not won through trial and error, for many police departments give their men a course in riding before sending them out.

One that has won acclaim for the thoroughness and success of its motorcycle training program is the Los Angeles Police Department. Out of many years of experience, embracing use of machines from the old one-lungers to the four-cylinder speedsters of today, the instructors there have evolved detailed “do” and “don’t” procedures. The “don’ts” come first:

.
Why Keds are the choice of world famous players (Oct, 1924)

Not only did they have very modern sports sneakers in 1924, but apparently they had a problem with knockoffs. Thus the tag line: “They are not Keds unless the name Keds is on the shoe”

Why Keds are the choice of world famous players

ELEVEN national and two world tennis championships last year — all won on Keds! That’s a remarkable tribute to Keds quality.

And here’s why these champion players selected Keds:

They wanted a shoe that would give them the maximum of ground-grip, comfort and speed — a shoe that would stand day after day of grinding, tearing wear.
Keds are especially built to meet every one of these requirements.

.
Coast-to-Coast Mail in 15 Seconds (Oct, 1960)

Coast-to-Coast Mail in 15 Seconds

A TV-like facsimile system will transmit mail between Chicago and Washington this fall—with a nation-wide fax mail operation in the offing

By S. DAVID PURSGLOVE

REVOLUTION takes place this fall in the way Uncle Sam handles the mail. Letters mailed in Washington, D. C, will be delivered in Chicago, Ill., the same day —thanks to electronic transmission.

The Post Office Department will put into regular use in October a television-like facsimile system between these two cities and their suburbs. Within seconds after reaching one post office, a letter will arrive in another, hundreds of miles away.

.
BALLOON SCARES BIRDS FROM GARDEN (May, 1933)

Wow. That’s a scary balloon. I’ll bet that will scare away thieves too.

BALLOON SCARES BIRDS FROM GARDEN

To frighten birds away from a berry patch or a newly planted lawn, where they often do considerable damage in a short time, home gardeners sometimes tie a slightly inflated paper sack to a stick. When it becomes damp, however, the bag is useless, and the string is always getting fouled on the stick. A more efficient and lasting device is shown at the left.

.
The Stay-Putnik (Mar, 1963)

After Telstar, what?

The Stay-Putnik

It’s our new Syncom, a satellite that promises a better bounce for world-wide TV and telephone

THE newest U.S. communications satellite—scheduled for launch this month or sooner, in an attempt to top Telstar— can’t be expected to streak across the sky at regular intervals. To the operators of a tracking station, it won’t even seem to be in orbit. Instead, the unnatural instrument package will hang around over the Atlantic, tracing a lazy north-south figure-8 every 24 hours.

.
Corkscrew Plane for Vertical Flight (Mar, 1933)

Corkscrew Plane for Vertical Flight

Can an airplane be built that will fly straight up? Many odd crafts have been built in vain attempts to solve this problem, but J. P. Sellmer, of Stinson Beach, Calif., is pinning his hopes to one of even stranger design than most. His corkscrew airplane, according to him will lift itself by means of a whirling, continuous wing of spiral design. A small propeller will keep the framework from spinning. Though aviation experts offer the idea little encouragement, Sellmer is busily putting the finishing touches to a large model with which he will test his theory.

.
Household Tools to Speed Home Work (Feb, 1932)

I think that the telephone on the second page is one of the earliest I’ve seen that has a modern handset.

Household Tools to Speed Home Work

VERSATILE TONGS. Useful in the kitchen are these tongs which serve many purposes from grasping hot potatoes to lifting eggs out of boiling water. Also at one end there is a handy bottle opener

DRIES HAIR QUICKLY. This new hair drier can be used with an ordinary gas plate. When the curved housing of sheet metal is set upon the burner, it directs outward a stream of hot air which, striking the hair, quickly dries it

THEY SAVE YOUR HANDS. Especially designed to aid in washing clothes are the tongs shown below. Their grip will not harm fragile fabrics, it is said

.
Schnoter’s Suspensories (Mar, 1922)

Schnoter’s Suspensories
Leaders For 51 Years

Perfect in every way, quality, fit and wear. Low price. Used in hospitals; prescribed by medical authorities.
If your druggist does not carry Schnoter’s —accept no substitutes. Order direct $ 1.00

Booklet of other styles sent upon request.

J. C. SCHNOTER CO.
Midland Park (Dept. P.) New Jersey

.
THE STARS HAVE HOBBIES (Feb, 1943)

Wow, Veronica Lake was one hot philatelist.

THE STARS HAVE HOBBIES

Edward G. Robinson, movie badman, below, collects pipes, has one of the country’s largest collections of briars. He smokes them, too.

Above, Paulette Goddard, when not being chased across the silver screen by Bob Hope, runs a bicycle sales and repair shop. Notice the bicycle in this picture?

Above, Amos (Freeman Gosden) makes with his drums and traps for the benefit of Andy (Charles Correll) who is an inveterate candid camera fiend.

.
All-In-One Kitchen (Jan, 1952)

All-In-One Kitchen combines a refrigerator with a three-burner range, sink, drainboard and storage compartment. Unit is 27-1/2 in. high, 36 in. wide. Made by General Air Conditioning, Los Angeles.

.