Archive
April, 2008 Monthly archive
Looking Back On Tomorrow (Sep, 1977)

Reading this ad sure takes me back. I know that the first thing I think about when I remember the seventies is the Fairchild F-8 microprocessor. Doesn’t everybody?

Looking Back On Tomorrow

“Science Fiction, my electronic eye.” great-grandfather said.
“Half the time it’s not fiction at all, just premature fact.”

by Boni Peluso

“Well, Bobby, how about a story before bedtime?” great-grandfather asked as he tucked me snugly into my weightless bubble.

“Oh, yes tell me some more about the old days and what they were like.”

He smiled and squeezed my arm. “OK son, I know just the thing. Long ago, back in 1999, I was being transferred from a unit control center in the New City to Space Station Zenith 1. While packing I found an old, old copy of Scientific American. It was yellow and rumpled and dated — imagine this—September 1977! At that time periodicals were printed on sheets of wood pulp!’ “Wow! No playback cards?”

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Balloons Are Booming (Jun, 1951)

Balloons Are Booming

Dream up a new inflatable toy and you’ll also inflate your bankroll.

By John Noah

“WHY do so few people have new ideas for toy balloons?” That’s the question that puzzles H. W. McConnell, president of one of America’s largest toy-balloon companies.

Balloon sales are booming and retail outlets are begging for new types to market —but the fresh ideas don’t seem to come. For want of amateur inventors, virtually every toy balloon that McConnell and many other balloon men produce must be devised by someone within the industry.

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BANKS PROTECTED BY CAMERA (Nov, 1928)

BANKS PROTECTED BY CAMERA

AN AUTOMATIC movie camera which is expected to play a big part in the detection of criminals has been invented by John E. Seebold of Los Angeles. The camera is hidden inside an automatic telephone box, where it is invisible and silent. The device will be installed in banks and other places likely to be visited by criminals, and in case of robbery the cashier can set the hidden camera going by pressing a button, getting a clear action picture of the holdup men. Pictures have been taken at a distance of 85 feet, the subjects being unaware of the camera’s presence.

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A BOAT ON WHEELS. (Apr, 1902)

These people are so freaking cool.

Click here for a much bigger image.

A BOAT ON WHEELS.

BY JOHN L. VON BLON.

The queerest ship that ever sailed is a yacht on wheels, a graceful land-going clipper, that glides over the pathless stretches of sun-blistered plain, and carries her plucky navigators to and from their gold mine in the desert. Solitary gold hunters who have seen her white sails silhouetted against the bleak brown background in their aimless wanderings have brought to the outer world strange and ludicrous tales of a phantom ship that sped by them like a bird on the wing. The spectacle of a trim-built craft such as ordinarily belongs to the sea skimming over that barren expanse where not a drop of water ever falls might well alarm less superstitious persons.

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MUSIC MADE VISIBLE IN WEIRD MOVIE (Nov, 1936)

MUSIC MADE VISIBLE IN WEIRD MOVIE

Futuristic patterns of light and shadow are projected upon a movie screen to accompany the music of Wagner’s “Song to the Evening Star,” in a unique sound film recently completed for exhibition in a New York theater. Marching rhymically across the audience’s field of view, the odd designs were produced by trick photography, with the aid of bracelets, toy balls, silks, and crushed tissue ribbons.

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How Science Will Foil the SKYJACKERS (Nov, 1970)

How Science Will Foil the SKYJACKERS

To see how new techniques and technology will thwart a potential air pirate, start here

By PAUL WAHL
ILLUSTRATION BY ROY DOTY

Ninety-seven passengers showed up for the flight, but 96 were on the Miami-bound plane when it took off from a New York airport one recent evening. Left at the gate, in the custody of two deputy U.S. marshals, was a gun-toting traveler. They nailed him after the loaded .38 revolver in his shoulder holster triggered a new weapons detector—one of the ingenious countermeasures devised by science to keep in-flight crime from getting off the ground.

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Scientific HIGHLIGHTS of Chicago’s WORLD FAIR (Oct, 1933)

Scientific HIGHLIGHTS of Chicago’s WORLD FAIR

It looks like the Chicago Fair were built especially for M-M fans. It is replete with the kind of mechanical wonders shown here.

While you’re casually viewing this display of priceless jewels an armed guard is watching your every move. If glass is broken, tray drops into vault.

If, when visiting the Fair, you’re curious as to the temperature at the moment, all you have to do is glance around the horizon and this world’s largest thermometer is sure to come within your view to tell you what you want to know.

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TOWER IS SCHOOL FOR PARACHUTE JUMPERS (Mar, 1935)

TOWER IS SCHOOL FOR PARACHUTE JUMPERS
So that novices may learn the sensations of parachute jumping and acquire confidence before they venture to leap from a plane, the Soviet government has established a training tower at Moscow that is believed to be the first of its kind in the world. A spiral stairway leads to a jumping platform at the top, where the tyro adjusts the harness of a permanently open parachute and leaps into space. A wire cable checks his descent for safety.

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IBM 1001 DATA TRANSMISSION SYSTEM (Dec, 1961)

Yup, this is a punched card modem.

IBM 1001 DATA TRANSMISSION SYSTEM

… new low cost way to send punched card data… by telephone

This IBM 1001 Data Transmission System lets you send business information in punched card form, from any office, plant or department to your central data processing installation at the cost of a telephone call.

It speeds collection of information concerning inventory, purchases, payroll, production, etc., keeps you continually informed of what’s happening in your business while it’s happening.

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INVENTORS BY ACCIDENT (Feb, 1950)

INVENTORS BY ACCIDENT

A mishap can make you a millionaire— if you’re alert enough to recognize a million-dollar idea when it hits you.

By Robert Cutler

WOULD you recognize a million-dollar idea if you fell over it? More than one man owes his good fortune to an accident —plus his own ability to learn and profit from it. Many inventions we enjoy today are the direct results of mishaps that have made their “victims” rich.

With Harry Waters of St. Louis, though, it was not one accident but a whole series that brought him a fortune. First, a stenographer in his office spilled a glass of water on him. Due for an appointment, Waters had to get a quick pressing job—not quick enough, however, to prevent his being late. So he had to take a taxi, even though he was nearly broke and desperate for money.

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