Archive
September, 2008 Monthly archive
SPIN YOUR GLOBE TO LONG ISLAND (Apr, 1939)

SPIN YOUR GLOBE TO LONG ISLAND

Only Six States Have More People than the Insular Empire that Ranges from a World’s Fair Through Potato Patches, Princely Estates, and Historic Shrines

By Frederick Simpich
With Illustrations from Photographs by Willard R. Culver

WHAT if a super-tugboat could cast a line about Long Island and haul it out to sea! Left exposed would be the broken ends of all the bridges and the under-river tunnels that now tie it to Manhattan.

Riding off on the runaway island would go more than 4-1/2 million people—but only if the start were made at night, for in the daytime a large share of these people work in New York.

Off on the floating island would also go about one-fourth of the sea trade of the whole United States, Uncle Sam’s Brooklyn Navy Yard, radio towers from which he talks with 34 countries overseas, his busiest coffee and sugar mart, 3,454 trains that run daily between New York and the island, shops that make navigation instruments for the whole world, strategic airports and plane factories, millionaire estates, herds of polo ponies, Forest Hills’ famous tennis courts, five million white ducks, to say nothing of Coney Island and other resorts where millions come to play, and a World’s Fair!

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New Burglar Alarm Set Off by Vibrations of Heartbeat (Jan, 1933)

I hope they don’t have rats at that bank, because it sounds like just about anything would set that alarm off.

New Burglar Alarm Set Off by Vibrations of Heartbeat

THERE have been numerous inventions to foil bank bandits in their hold-up attempts but the latest one is the most original. The vibrations of the human heart-heat set off an alarm bell.

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The Telephone Way to a Happier Day (Sep, 1958)

But don’t you dare pick up that phone until the house is clean! And always make sure to keep a picture of your husband on the table to prevent impure thoughts.

The Telephone Way to a Happier Day

Try it today when the dishes are done, beds made, clothes in the washer. You’ve earned a break.

So relax a little and pick up the telephone. Enjoy a cheerful visit with a friend or loved one.

It’s so easy to do, whatever the miles may be. For no one is ever far away by telephone.

It helps to make any day a happier day at both ends of the line.

“It’s fun to Phone”

Bell Telephone System

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Home-Built Tracks for Electric Trains (Feb, 1931)

Home-Built Tracks for Electric Trains

by DICK COLE

You’ll add immeasurably to the fun you’ll get from your toy train if you build these extra tracks and bridges for it.

UNDOUBTEDLY thousands of boys throughout the land will be the recipients of electric trains for Christmas. It is safe to say that no other toy offers such a wide field for experimentation. However, the initial gift usually includes only the electric locomotive, a string of cars, and a comparatively short length of oval tracks. The novelty of seeing the train go ’round and ’round soon wears off. In fact, probably two weeks after Christmas, many electric trains will be stored away in the closet—forgotten.

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Land, Water Plane Equipped With “Basketball” Wheels (Jul, 1934)

Land, Water Plane Equipped With “Basketball” Wheels

A RADICALLY new type of landing gear is now being used on a German low-wing monoplane, permitting the ship to land with equal ease and safety on land or water.

Two large rubber balls, resembling nothing more than huge basketballs, spin freely inside cup-shaped boots. On land the balls turn just as wheels do on the ordinary land airplane. On water, however, the balls act as pontoons, skidding over the waves.

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triga – General Dynamics (Sep, 1958)

You have to hand it General Dynamics, they managed to make nuclear reactors seem incredibly stylish.

triga – General Dynamics
One of a series of posters displayed during the Second International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy in Geneva, September, 1958. Triga is an inherently safe training, research, isotope-production reactor designed and manufactured by the General Atomic Division of General Dynamics Corporation.
GENERAL DYNAMICS CORPORATION • 445 PARK AVENUE. NEW YORK 2 2 . N . Y.

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Icy Missiles from the Summer Sky (Aug, 1931)

Icy Missiles from the Summer Sky

by Calvin Frazer

Do hailstones enter the earth’s atmosphere, like falling meteors, from the outer spaces? In this article Mr, Fraser explodes the “Cosmic Ice” theory and explains just how hailstones are formed in hot weather by the violent upward air currents of gigantic thunderheads.

WHAT is hail? And what isn’t? If you can answer these questions you are wiser than the professional weathermen were until a generation or so ago. Up to that time three totally different things had generally been confounded with one another under the single name “hail”, and confusion on this subject still prevails widely outside of scientific circles.

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“Rotolactor” Milks 50 Cows in 12 Minutes (Feb, 1931)

Rotolactor would be an awesome name for a Decepticon.

“Rotolactor” Milks 50 Cows in 12 Minutes

MILKING fifty cows in twelve and a half minutes is the feat performed by a newly devised mechanical milking machine, which is now being employed by the Walker-Bordon Laboratories, of Plainsbury, New Jersey, to milk thrice daily the 1,680 cows owned by the gigantic dairy. The machine, which is called a “Rotolactor,” resembles a large merry-go-round, having a platform sixty feet in diameter, making one revolution each 12-1/2 minutes, during which time the milking of each cow is completed.

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The FREAK of the Month ~ No. 3 – The Rotor Airship (Feb, 1931)

The FREAK of the Month ~ No. 3 – The Rotor Airship
The oddest contraption which has been brought to our attention this month is the rotor airplane designed by Ernst Zeuzem, of Frankfort-on-Main, Germany. The inventor’s model is shown in the inset, while above is an artist’s conception of how the full-size plane would appear in the air. Each of the four rotors will be driven by separate motors which need not be of exceptional power. The passengers will be carried in the wing section. In spite of its odd design, the principles of this plane are sound.

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Amateur Chemist’s Robot (Apr, 1936)

Amateur Chemist’s Robot
Hyman Cordon, chemical student, of Boston, with a “man” he built out of rubber, glass, and other scraps. It eats food and digests it in human fashion, having heart, intestines, lungs, bladder, etc. It was exhibited at a recent “science fair.” (Int. News)

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