A UNITIZED MICROFILM SYSTEM… (Dec, 1961)

Here’s a better, more practical way to reproduce engineering drawings

A UNITIZED MICROFILM SYSTEM…

1. saves time of engineers, file clerks, draftsmen

2. saves space—compact card files replace bulky drawing files

3. saves materials and mailing costs

Turn out high-quality prints on ordinary paper by xerography!

The benefits of a unitized microfilm system begin at the drafting board and spread throughout a company to save time, materials, and space.

1. Important savings result from more productive use of engineers’ time … no costly waiting for prints. 2. Sizeable reductions in materials and mailing costs provide further savings. 3. All drafting can be done in pencil on plain white paper … no inking on expensive vellum or linen

A unitized microfilm system has three basic steps: microfilming original drawings or changes; mounting the individual microfilm frames into die-cut apertures of data-processing cards; and, from the cards, automatically enlarging the microfilmed drawings into workable size by a xerographic printer.

Dry, positive, reduced-size prints on ordinary paper—easy to read and easy to handle—emerge in seconds, ready for immediate use. There is no refiling. The quality of xerographic prints is superb, yet they are so inexpensive, engineers may discard them after use.

Unitized microfilm systems offer many other striking economies. Our booklet on benefits is yours for the asking. Write Xerox Corporation

(formerly Haloid Xerox Inc.) 61-185X Haloid Street, Rochester 3, N. Y. Branch offices in principal U.S. and Canadian cities. Overseas: Rank-

Xerox Ltd., London.

3 comments
  1. katey says: May 31, 20088:34 pm

    Yes… the drawings don’t need to be refiled… but the punch cards still need to be filed.

  2. Casandro says: June 1, 20081:04 am

    Well but if you have those things on punch cards, you can use all your punch card processing systems.

  3. Benzene says: June 2, 20088:23 am

    Filing the punch cards was probably nothing next to the smelly chemicals and gallons of water needed to make old-school blueprints or whiteprints.

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