All Right…Let’s TEST CATHOLIC LOYALTY! (Sep, 1952)

All Right…Let’s TEST CATHOLIC LOYALTY!

The majority of non-Catholics do not question the patriotism of their Catholic fellow-citizens.

They have seen too many Catholic sons die beside their own on countless battlefields. They have stood too often with Catholics in defense of common ideals and a common heritage.

Yet the ugly voice of bigotry is heard again — warning that Catholics “owe allegiance to a foreign potentate”… that “Popery” is a “menace to democracy”. .. even that Catholicism is as “totalitarian as Communism.”

Informed non-Catholics will scorn these unworthy accusations. But in the interest of truth and goodwill among people of all faiths, this miserable skeleton of intolerance should be exposed for the benefit of the many who otherwise may become unwitting victims of false and misleading books, tracts and other anti-Catholic propaganda.

One critic in the United States suggests that the Catholic Church is “undemocratic” because it opposes such things as birth control, divorce and questionable reading matter. By this unreasonable standard, a religious denomination which opposes alcoholic drink could also be called “undemocratic” because it holds principles contrary to the law of the land. Catholics, certainly, make no such criticism.

Catholics are called “undemocratic” because they have their own schools. By the same reasoning, all other denominations with church-sponsored schools and colleges could be likewise condemned, despite the fact that religious schools preceded tax-supported schools in the United States and Canada, and that most of our private colleges and universities were founded by religious bodies.

The Catholic Church is called an “alien” religion because the Vatican is located in Italy.

All of the major religious faiths of the United States and Canada had their origin in foreign lands. And the fact is that the religions professed by these bodies are at this very time the state religions in certain other lands. But does anyone call them “undemocratic?”

For nearly 2,000 years, the Catholic Church has existed under any and all forms of government. Its people comply with the political system of the land they live in… refusing to comply only if a political state should command them to violate God’s law. An example is the Catholic resistance to Communism wherever it appears — because Catholicism and Communism are incompatible.

In the interest of harmony and goodwill … and as a matter of Christian and intellectual honesty … you should learn the truth about Catholics before seeking to judge them. We will be happy to send you free and without obligation an explanatory pamphlet which gives a clear picture of the Catholic Church in its relation to government and the social order. Write today… ask for Pamphlet No. C-35.

SUPREME COUNCIL KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS RELIGIOUS INFORMATION BUREAU 4422 LINDELL BLVD.

ST. LOUIS 8, MISSOURI

8 comments
  1. Abdul Alhazred says: February 21, 201111:50 am

    An anti-Catholic side of the red scare?

    Didn’t know that, but not surprised.

  2. John says: February 21, 201111:57 am

    How does the Red Scare enter into it? What a dumb thing to say. The Second Ku Klux Klan had been preaching anti-Catholicism since about 1912.

  3. Abdul Alhazred says: February 21, 20111:14 pm

    Why bring up the red scare?

    The time frame is right, plus this:

    “For nearly 2,000 years, the Catholic Church has existed under any and all forms of government. Its people comply with the political system of the land they live in… refusing to comply only if a political state should command them to violate God’s law. An example is the Catholic resistance to Communism wherever it appears — because Catholicism and Communism are incompatible.”

    And who says the KKK didn’t glom on to the red scare?

  4. John says: February 21, 20114:31 pm

    Abdul Alhazred: “And who says the KKK didn’t glom on to the red scare?”

    well, the fact that they were also preaching against Communism in 1912.

    You did say “An anti-Catholic side of the red scare”. The Knights of Columbus are famous for being the group that lobbied Congress to add the unconstitutional “under god” to the Pledge of Allegiance partly to strike a blow against “godless communism”. Also with the quote you provided your earlier post makes even less sense now.

    Time frame being right isn’t much of an excuse to bring up the Red Scare either. Its also the same time frame for the premiere of CBC Toronto, West Germany joining the IMF and the Mau Mau uprising in Kenya.

  5. Charlene says: February 22, 20119:36 am

    If you ask me those Mau Maus have some ‘splainin’ to do.

  6. Orv says: February 22, 20114:08 pm

    This was still a major issue when JFK ran for President. Opponents questioned his loyalty, arguing he would be a puppet of the Pope.

    I found it interesting when John Kerry ran for President and was criticized for not following the dictates of Catholicism closely *enough*…we’ve sort of come full circle.

  7. John says: February 22, 20115:36 pm

    Orv: Specifically folks like Dr Norman Vincent Peale speculated openly on whether a Catholic President would receive instructions from the Pope.

    In the 1928 Presidential election the Democrats had nominated Al Smith as their first Roman Catholic candidate. Same thing was said about him.

    If you look into it a number of the Founding Fathers were anti-Catholic.

  8. Charlene says: February 23, 201111:23 am

    Anti-Catholicism is a legacy brought to America by the English, who made up the majority of pre-revolutionary voluntary settlers. The years 1625-1714 marked the zenith of anti-Catholicism in England for various reasons (memories of the Armada, the Gunpowder Plot, the Civil War, the Glorious Revolution, the War of the Spanish Succession, etc., etc.). What’s more, the sects that were the most fervent enemies of Catholicism were over-represented among immigrant groups. Add to that the tendency of despised indentured servants to be Catholic (as many of them were Irish) and the subsequent waves of immigration from Ireland, Poland, and Catholic Germany, and it’s not surprising that anti-Catholicism was more intense and longer-lasting than in England. Even today there are places in the US where anti-Catholicism is commonplace, albeit muddled in with anti-Mexican sentiment.

    In other words, not only does it predate the Red Scare, it predates America itself.

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