ANNOUNCING NOVA (Jul, 1978)

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ANNOUNCING NOVA

THE MOST SPECTACULARLY BEAUTIFUL NEW STAR IN THE COMMUNICATIONS GALAXY

THE SCIENCE FICTION OF YOUR CHILDHOOD IS THE SCIENCE FACT OF TODAY.

YOU ARE INVITED TO RESERVE THE PREMIER ISSUE NOW UNDER OUR SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY CHARTER OFFER!

“I am vitally Interested In the future, because I am going to spend the rest of my life there.” —Charles F. Kettering

You are invited to step into the future — your future —to savor every aspect of it, as it unfolds before you through the pages of a bold, new magazine —so visually stunning … so intellectually exciting … so extraordinary an experience… that nothing remotely like it has ever existed before!

NOVA What makes NOVA so special — so unique?

THE MOST BRILLIANT SCIENTISTS, THINKERS, AND WRITERS IN THE WORLD.

Each stunning issue of NOVA will be bringing into your home — and into your life – the thoughts, the dreams, the accomplishments of the men and women who have changed the course of history and transformed the world we live in. The roster of international luminaries who will be writing for you will include such notables as: ALVIN TOFFLER, BUCKMINSTER FULLER, STANLEY KUBRICK, RENE DUBOS, PAUL EHRLICH, BARRY COMMONER, CARL SAGAN, LINUS PAULING, LEWIS MUMFORD, FRANCIS CRICK, STEVEN SPIELBERG, GEORGE LUCAS, EDWARD TELLER, JONAS SALK, MARGARET MEAD, RALPH NADER, JACQUES-YVES COUSTEAU.

NOVA – THE FIRST MAGAZINE TO COMBINE SCIENCE FACT WITH SCIENCE FICTION…

Each issue will also bring you the superb science fiction of recognized masters such as: ISAAC ASIMOV .. . ARTHUR C. CLARKE .. . FRED HOYLE ..RAY BRADBURY … FRANK HERBERT … A.E. VAN VOGT . .. AND ROBERT HEINLEIN as well as the best of the exciting new writers.

THE ULTIMATE IN MODERN ILLUSTRATION AND PHOTOGRAPHY.

Visually, NOVA will be a truly extravagant feast for the eye. Printed on heavy enameled paper, it will reproduce the genius of world-renowned illustrators and photographers—all in colors so true, so alive, that they will seem to jump off the page.

You’ll find NOVA provides a window opening on the strange and exciting world of: Space Colonies, Cloning, Machine Intelligence, Regeneration, Lasers, Computers, Extrasensory Perception, Black Holes, The Origin of Life, Genetic Engineering, Fusion, Solar Power, Time Dilation, Aging, Life After Death, Ultrasonics, Chemical Learning, Transplants, Geothermal Energy, Behavior Modification, UFO’s and Other Extraterrestrial Phenomena, Tachyons, Holography, Weather Control, Anti-Matter, Superconductivity, Bionics, Microsurgery, Artificial Galaxies, Magnetic Bubbles, Future Farming, Dreams, Transmutation, Immortality, Molecular Clouds, Undersea Habitats, Interspecies Communication, Cybernetics, Nuclear Wastes Storage Coding, Natural Pain Killers, Cosmology, Extraterrestrial Life Come into the future with NOVA.

CLAIM YOUR COPY OF THE PREMIER ISSUE.

6 comments
  1. Hirudinea says: October 24, 20117:32 am

    Anybody know what happened to NOVA?

  2. Buddy says: October 24, 20118:25 am

    It became OMNI!Until I went to college, bought every issue. Some good SF writing in there. A lot of the science was iffy, but they had great interviews of popular figures like Linus Pauling, Colin Turnbull and Chuck Yeager. I remember they devoted a good portion of several issues to the (then new) Rubik’s cube.

  3. Hirudinea says: October 24, 20115:58 pm

    @ Buddy – Really it became OMNI, I loved OMNI!

  4. Andrew L. Ayers says: October 25, 201110:24 am

    I’ve been trying to collect all the back issues of Omni – I’ve got most of the first and second years so far (including a copy of the premier issue). I’ll probably never get them all…

  5. Charlie says: October 25, 201110:54 am

    Andrew: If you think that’s hard, try doing it for a magazine that started in 1928.

  6. Tim says: October 27, 20118:53 am

    Yeah, I immediately recognized that cover as the premier issue of Omni. I still have that well-worn issue somewhere.
    I subscribed for many years, until the pseudo-science overwhelmed the real stuff, and the sci-fi became a remote secondary feature (late 80′s-early 90′s?).

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