anti-aircraft fire control… AND FORD INSTRUMENT COMPANY (Jun, 1955)

The whole series of ads is like this. Just bizarre.

anti-aircraft fire control… AND FORD INSTRUMENT COMPANY

In World War I, anti-aircraft fire against slow, low flying planes, could be managed by optical sighting and correcting from observed air bursts. Today’s supersonic planes, flying at great altitudes must be tracked by radar and the guns directed by complex computers.

The Navy Bureau of Ordnance and Ford Instrument Company perfected the first successful naval anti-aircraft gun director (Mk 19) back in 1926 and Ford Instrument Company has been one of the outstanding leaders in this field ever since.

Precision equipment for the exacting problems of computers and controls for both the military and industry, has been the specialty of Ford Instrument Company since 1915.

Ever since Hannibal C.: Ford built the first gunfire computers for the U. S. Navy forty years ago, Ford Instrument Company has been a leader in applying the science of automatic control to American defense and peacetime industry. For more information about Ford’s products, services, and facilities, write for free illustrated brochure.

FORD INSTRUMENT COMPANY DIVISION OF THE SPERRY CORPORATION 31-10 Thomson Ave., Long Island City 1, N. Y.

6 comments
  1. Charlene says: May 26, 201012:24 am

    “Our toys can beat up your toys”?

  2. jayessell says: May 26, 20108:01 am

    Hannibal C.: Ford?

    Not C:/ ?

  3. Kosher Ham says: May 26, 201010:22 am

    It goes to show you that there were more Fords than just Henry and Gerald R.

  4. Don says: May 26, 201010:28 am

    @jayessell: the “Hannibal C.:Ford” was a scanner problem: in the text it’s clearly “Hannibal C. Ford” with a smudge . . . .

  5. Tim says: May 26, 201010:48 am

    The next ad will show them eating raw slices of that duck skewered on their combat knives…

  6. Michael says: May 26, 20106:07 pm

    Think about the date 1955… Tv was new, puppets were hot and cute, and Ford was seeking military contracts. In 1955 much of this was still SC-FI to most people. Equating manual aiming to child’s play was rather smart I’d say.

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