Britain’s Walls of Fire (Sep, 1945)

A vertical flame thrower is certainly an cool looking, if not terribly practical idea.

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Britain’s Walls of Fire

Awesome flame defenses protected Britain against Nazi invasion in 1940

FIVE years after Britain’s darkest days, when invasion threatened hourly, it is revealed that a barrier of flame would have met the Nazis if they had attempted to storm the English coast. The coast and adjacent waters would have been set afire. Oil tanks were sunk in hillsides; pipelines ran out under the sea.

3 comments
  1. Stannous says: October 18, 200611:06 am

    This is a real thing. It was actually used in 1949 against a small German invasion force.

    http://www.newscientist…

    The results were horrendously effective and for weeks after badly burned German bodies washed ashore.

  2. djwa says: November 27, 20065:33 pm

    I think you meant 1939 perhaps. Unfortunately, the link you posted actually refutes the idea of any real invasion.

    For example

    “A fascinating analysis of the Shingle Street Myth…Eloquent testimony to the willingness of some journalists to peddle completely bogus stories, and [it] demonstrates how unnecessary secrecy can generate ridiculous ‘history’” (Nigel West).

    and

    “It also gives the real story of the few genuine German bodies to have washed up on beaches. It covers in detail the propaganda designed to build up the story of a failed invasion and the myths surrounding Shingle Street.”

  3. djwa says: November 27, 20065:49 pm

    1939 perhaps. Unfortunately the link you posted appears to refute the idea that there was ever a real invasion.

    First paragraph says for instance,

    “It also gives the real story of the few genuine German bodies to have washed up on beaches. It covers in detail the propaganda designed to build up the story of a failed invasion and the myths surrounding Shingle Street.”

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