Canvas House Costing But $1000 to Be Home of Future (Jun, 1934)

Canvas House Costing But $1000 to Be Home of Future

CANVAS is now being considered by architects as an attractive and economical building material for the small homes of the future. Canvas can now be treated with preservative paints to make it waterproof and fireproof.

A summer home which can be built anywhere for less than $1000 uses canvas almost exclusively as a surfacing material. The open lower deck, raised one foot off the ground to avoid dampness, is used for garage, storage, and shower bath. The main floor 8 feet above is reached by a folding stairway, as is the sun-deck above.

9 comments
  1. Mike says: June 24, 20115:25 am

    When ever I read “of the future” my mind adds a deep echo. I imagine one strong breeze would take the house down. I am looking at the picture, how does one get to the sundeck?

  2. M.S.W. says: June 24, 20116:08 am

    You get to the top deck with your Buck Rogers backpack Mike ;)

  3. TimE says: June 24, 20118:41 am

    You get to the sun deck via a folding stairway, it’s right there in the caption. I can’t help but think that even though this place CAN be built anywhere, it SHOULDN’T be built everywhere.

  4. Lloyd Alter says: June 24, 20119:30 am

    you did that 4 years ago, a different version http://blog.modernmecha…

  5. Mike says: June 24, 20119:55 am

    TimE, for some reason I misread that, thanks for pointing it out.

  6. Hirudinea says: June 24, 201110:02 am

    Might be fun in the summer but $1000 was a lot back then and I don’t see this as any type of permenent structure.

  7. Tim says: June 24, 201110:12 am

    “Canvas can now be treated with preservative paints to make it waterproof and fireproof.”

    Just like the Hindenburg.

  8. Casandro says: June 25, 201111:08 am

    I wonder how they do the insulating.

  9. John Savard says: June 25, 201112:54 pm

    It’s interesting that the earlier article, which quotes a price of $1,500, is from February, 1933. I wonder if this story about an architect with a novel idea for low-cost housing was part of what inspired Ayn Rand to write The Fountainhead ten years later.

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