Archive
Animals For Profit
He Runs a Hotel for Bats (Sep, 1940)

He Runs a Hotel for Bats

PLAYING host to 250,000 bats is the queer but profitable hobby of Milton F. Campbell, of San Antonio, Tex. His lakeside bat hotel, a tall wooden tower shaped like the base of a windmill, is the outgrowth of experiments begun years ago by his father, Dr. Charles A. R. Campbell, at that time city bacteriologist of San Antonio. Believing that bats would rid the area of malaria-carrying mosquitoes, Dr. Campbell spent years trying to induce the creatures to settle in a wooden roost which he constructed near the city sewage plant. Finally, by means of ear-splitting phonograph records, which drove the bats from their accustomed haunts, he effected their transfer to his specially constructed tower.

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How Science Made a Better Bee (Sep, 1944)

This is how we end up with killer bees.

How Science Made a Better Bee

Amazing new discoveries bring improvement to nature’s masterpiece, enabling the busy little insect to do a better job for war.

By ALFRED H. SINKS

Photographs by WILLIAM MORRIS and ROBERT F SMITH

THE tiny honeybee—far more important to both war industry and our food supply than most people realize—is getting a lot of attention nowadays. Though nature has produced few animals as remarkable as these industrious little insects, entomologists and geneticists have found the means to improve on its handiwork. They are actually producing bees that work harder and so produce more honey—bees that are more industrious and energetic, healthier, and better able to protect their bee cities against natural enemies. Truly amazing are some of the results of this partnership of science and nature, and its future achievements may be greater still.

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HEDGEHOG HUNTING GOOD TRADE AND GOOD SPORT (Oct, 1923)

HEDGEHOG HUNTING GOOD TRADE AND GOOD SPORT

By SAM E. CONNER

TRAPPING hedgehogs does not sound like a very attractive pursuit, but a man in Maine has found it to be a profitable business, as well as one that has an element of danger, and therefore offers excitement in excess of that which comes to a rabbit or fox hunter. While it is not generally known, there is a steady demand for these ugly-looking creatures from all sections of America and Europe. They are desired for zoos and menageries, both private and public, and country-fair and street venders, who use them to aid in selling preparations, disposed of under the name of hedgehog oil, hedgehog liniment, and like titles, provide still another market.

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RAISING RABBITS for PROFIT (Aug, 1938)

RAISING RABBITS for PROFIT

RAISING rabbits for the market is a back-yard industry that has grown to million dollar proportions in the last few years. It is estimated that rabbit owners are receiving five million dollars annually from meat and fur, with the demand still going up.

In the past raising rabbits was simply a hobby, but now many people are devoting all their time to the small animals. Small initial capital, the small amount of space required, and the rapid development of rabbits to market size are factors that have stimulated the industry.

To get into the business you should first investigate marketing arrangements in your area. In some places slaughter houses that specialize in rabbits call for the live animals when they are ready. In other localities you arrange with a butcher to handle the output of your hutches. Domestic rabbit flesh is a delicious, tender meat comparable to breast of chicken.

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Horse-Meat “Worms” Fool Frogs (Sep, 1940)

Yum!

Horse-Meat “Worms” Fool Frogs

TRICKING frogs into eating horse meat by making them think it alive is the solution worked out by H. L. Parker, of El Monte, Calif., for the problem of diet in domestic bullfrog breeding. For twenty years, Parker has been experimenting in raising frogs as a food delicacy. Recently he decided to try feeding his frogs on a horse-meat menu, since he found it practically impossible to provide the frogs’ natural live diet of vast quantities of minnows, insects, and earthworms. He contracted with the owner of a near-by lion farm for a supply of horse meat, the regular food of captive lions. This he chopped into strips about the size of worms and tossed into his concrete frog tanks.

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THREE AMERICAN Chinchilla Farms PRODUCE MOST COSTLY FURS (Dec, 1933)

THREE AMERICAN Chinchilla Farms PRODUCE MOST COSTLY FURS

Wild Creatures from South American Andes Thrive in Captivity and Make Their Owner a Fortune in the Mountainous Sections of Our Western States

By Andrew R. Boone

IF YOU want the world’s finest fur coat, with wool long enough to thread a needle and fine as a spider’s web, you can get it, not from animals roaming at large in faraway places, but from captive rodents.

On three farms in Idaho, Utah, and California these tiny chinchillas grow. Naturalists call them the “missing link” between the rabbit, the squirrel, and the rat.

From the South American Andes, a former mining engineer, alone of the scores who have sought with fortunes and considerable skill to remove these strange little creatures from their native haunts in Peru and Chile to European and American pens, has transplanted a dozen. Today his herd numbers 160, only twenty more than would be required to make one large coat like the one illustrated at the extreme right.

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“Airborne” Chickens Roost in Glider Nose (Sep, 1948)

“Airborne” Chickens Roost in Glider Nose
Something their designers never anticipated was that the noses of wartime gliders make excellent chicken houses. English users have found they are dry, draftproof and that the original windows provide sufficient light. Costing only a fraction as much as conventional chicken houses, they are eight by nine feet across the base and approximately seven feet high at the center.

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Grow “ERMINE” Coats in Back Yard Rabbit Hutch (Sep, 1932)

Be sure to check out the picture of the little girl dressed head to toe in rabbit skins on page 4. She looks like a character out of the Flintstones.

Grow “ERMINE” Coats in Back Yard Rabbit Hutch

Furriers pay rabbit growers in United States over $30,000,000 a year for pelts, from which are made fur coats selling from $300 to $5,000 each. This article tells you how you set up in rabbit raising as a backyard pastime and reap the biggest profits from smallest outlay of cash.

by H. H. DUNN

MARY PALMER, who teaches school for $1,500 a year at San Diego, California, came out of the winter of 1930-31, with the determination to have a fur coat for the next winter.

“If I start saving now, and go in debt a little in the fall, I can get myself one of those $300 coats for a Christmas present,” she told her father.

“If you will give me an hour of your time every day, from now until next October,” replied her father, “I will give you a fur coat that you cannot buy for five times $300 and it will cost not more than $30, probably half that amount.”

As a matter of fact, for this is a true story, Mary’s father produced the fur coat on the date promised, and Mary sold it for $650 to a furrier, who, in turn, sold it for $1575. Then Mary’s father gave her another just like it. The total cost of the coats to Mr. Palmer was less than $15 each, and, with their trimmings, they represented an actual outlay of not more than $35 each.

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AMAZING POULTRY SECRETS (Feb, 1949)

AMAZING POULTRY SECRETS

I would like to send you my PICTURE TOUR BOOK absolutely FREE about one of America’s largest and oldest Poultry Farm and Hatchery organizations.

My book is very complete and full of interesting and in* structive color pictures. I know you’ll enjoy and profit by reading it.

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READ THE HAMSTER MANUAL (Apr, 1948)

READ THE HAMSTER MANUAL

The most complete guide book on the successful breeding and raising of Syrian Golden Hamsters. Tells all about this new, fast growing, profitable and interesting hobby industry. Reveals all the secrets of the largest breeder of these delightfully profitable pets and laboratory animals. 34 Chapters chuck-full of information gleaned from actual experience as a breeder. Twenty Pages of illustrations. A few subjects are: history, housing, three methods of breeding, easy to get feeds, sexing, fertility vitamins, handling, educational, scientific projects, crating, profits and selling, where to buy and how to sell hamsters. Sent postpaid for $1.00.

Albert F. Marsh, 1524 Basil St., Mobile, Alabama

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