Archive
Dogs
Dog’s Tail Forms Radio Receiver (Nov, 1934)

Dog’s Tail Forms Radio Receiver
A DOG’S tail serves as a radio receiver for Frank G. Kerk, Los Angeles experimenter. Kerk attaches an aerial to the collar of his Great Dane and hooks an ear phone to the animal’s tail. The canine radio is then complete and all that is necessary is to place the phone to the ear and listen.

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Walking the Dog Drives Poochmobile (Nov, 1939)

The caption is funny too: “Z. Wiggs out for a spin in his pooch-mobile. “
The guy’s name is Z. Wiggs, but when I read it I thought the dog’s name was Z and he was wigging out for a ride. I like my interpretation better.

Walking the Dog Drives Poochmobile
DOG power drives an odd vehicle constructed by Z. Wiggs, eighty-year-old dog trainer and former railroad worker of Denton, Tex. Operating on the squirrel-cage principle, the dogmobile has a giant central wheel which is revolved as a dog walks or
runs on its inside surface. The four-legged canine engine is anchored to a central shaft by a special collar. Power is transmitted to rear drive wheels by means of a belt-and-pulley mechanism which the driver controls by a “gearshift” lever.

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Mechanical Cues DIRECT Animals in the “BARKIES” (Jun, 1932)

Odd article explaining all of the tricks and techniques used by trainers to get their animals to perform in movies without using vocal commands.

Mechanical Cues DIRECT Animals in the “BARKIES”

by WALTER A. RASCHICK

When the talkies came in, directors of animal pictures faced a new problem. Before the super-sensitive mike, vocal commands were impossible, so other means of giving “stars” their cues had to be devised. In this unusual article you are taken behind the scenes and shown how directors utilize ingenious mechanical gadgets to make animals perform with keen intelligence before the camera.

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Second Dog Is Restored to Life (Jan, 1935)

Second Dog Is Restored to Life

ROBERT E. CORNISH, California biologist, who amazed the scientific world last spring by reviving a dog clinically put to death (Modern Mechanix and Inventions, July, 1934) recently repeated the success of his original experiment with even more encouraging results.

Lazarus IV, subject of the first successful experiment, has learned to crawl, bark, sit up on its haunches and consume nearly a pound of meat a day. The dog is blind and cannot stand alone, but results encouraged Dr. Cornish to launch a new series of experiments.

Recently Lazarus V was put to death with an overdose of ether. Half an hour after its breathing had stopped and five minutes after its heart was stilled, the animal was revived by means of chemicals and artificial respiration. Dr. Cornish, enthusiastic, has been reported as saying that Lazarus V returned nearer normalcy in four days than the other Lazarus in thirteen days.

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Eyeglasses for Dogs (Apr, 1939)

There is actually a company called Doggles that sells prescription eyewear for your dog.

Eyeglasses for Dogs

BY MENTIONING that her dog seemed nearsighted, a girl customer started an optician of Geneva, Switzerland, on his way to becoming a specialist in fitting canines with glasses. Not only did he succeed in curing her pet, but now he has found a novel and profitable career in applying his newly discovered methods to other four-footed subjects.

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Electronic Leash Shocks Sense Into Fido (Aug, 1960)

Electronic Leash Shocks Sense Into Fido
AN electronic device, called Electro-Leash, can literally shock sense into your pooch —shaping him into a show dog or simply teaching him to behave around the house.

The obedience trainer consists of a palm-sized, transistorized pulse generator, 50 feet of wire which also serves as the leash and a dog collar with two tiny electrodes.

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Pooch Is Up to His Neck In Automobile (Sep, 1954)

I’m not sure why, but this just seems wrong to me.

Pooch Is Up to His Neck In Automobile
European cars are small and have no room for large dogs, so an ingenious dog lover has converted the trunk into a roomy traveling kennel. A hole cut in the trunk lid permits the dog to get air and, if he desires, to see where he has been, at least.

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