Archive
Animals
Death Chamber for Dogs Is Built into Truck (Nov, 1937)

Yes, every little girl should have the character building experience of watching her dog’s execution. She seems to be taking it well.

Death Chamber for Dogs Is Built into Truck
A death chamber for dogs is a feature of a truck operated by the Animal Protective Association of Washington, D. C. Incurably sick or injured animals are placed in the compartment and destroyed by carbon monoxide gas.

.
HEDGEHOG HUNTING GOOD TRADE AND GOOD SPORT (Oct, 1923)

HEDGEHOG HUNTING GOOD TRADE AND GOOD SPORT

By SAM E. CONNER

TRAPPING hedgehogs does not sound like a very attractive pursuit, but a man in Maine has found it to be a profitable business, as well as one that has an element of danger, and therefore offers excitement in excess of that which comes to a rabbit or fox hunter. While it is not generally known, there is a steady demand for these ugly-looking creatures from all sections of America and Europe. They are desired for zoos and menageries, both private and public, and country-fair and street venders, who use them to aid in selling preparations, disposed of under the name of hedgehog oil, hedgehog liniment, and like titles, provide still another market.

.
Trained Cockroach Smuggles Smokes (Jun, 1938)

Trained Cockroach Smuggles Smokes
How a prisoner in solitary confinement received forbidden cigarettes was revealed by Amarillo, Tex., jail officials. Inmates tied a cigarette and match to the back of a trained cockroach, which smuggled them into the cell.

.
CIRCUS “HIPPO” IS HARNESSED AND TRAINED TO DRAW CART (Mar, 1924)

CIRCUS “HIPPO” IS HARNESSED AND TRAINED TO DRAW CART

After considerable coaching at the hands of an animal trainer, “Lotus,” a circus hippopotamus enjoying winter quarters in California, was taught to haul a two-wheeled cart. A V-shaped tongue attached to a broad band around the creature’s back made traces unnecessary. A bridle of strong leather with the reins attached to the jaws completed the harness, and aided in directing the “river horse” which seemed to enjoy its “stunt” as it walked to its pool and back. Hippopotamuses are said usually to show little intelligence, but they are capable of great speed when in flight from an enemy, or while rushing to an attack after being wounded.

.
Plumbers Use Alligators To Open Clogged Pipes (Feb, 1938)

Well, I guess we know now where that urban legend about alligators in the sewer started.

Plumbers Use Alligators To Open Clogged Pipes

Alligators kept as specimens at the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries aquarium in Washington, D.C, are being tried out as plumber’s assistants to open up clogged pipes. Placed in a length of pipe that is stopped up with silt and sediment, the reptile digs his way through, opening up a small hole which water later will widen by its pressure as it sweeps through.

.
World’s Largest Gorilla Preserved by New Art of Sculpturdermy (Jan, 1938)

I love how these people kill an animal and then talk about how they have “brought it to life”. Check out the last page in this pictorial. It is really bizarre.

World’s Largest Gorilla Preserved by New Art of Sculpturdermy

In the Remarkable Series of Pictures Reproduced on these Pages, You See How Sculpture and Taxidermy Were Combined To Re-Create a Rare Animal Specimen

AMAZINGLY lifelike, the mounted body of the world’s largest gorilla, a 500-pound giant, is being put on exhibition at the Academy of Natural Sciences, in Philadelphia, Pa. The enormous brute, together with its mate and baby, were bagged by a recent West African expedition led by George Vanderbilt, New York sportsman and explorer. The delicate work of mounting the gorillas was accomplished at the Jonas Brothers Studios, in Mt. Vernon, N. Y. On these four pages, you find pictured the successive steps, combining sculpture and taxidermy, which “brought to life” the jungle family. As an initial step, the experts assembled the bones of the skeleton by means of wires and steel rods.

.
Hen Changed to Rooster by Biologists (Feb, 1936)

Hen Changed to Rooster by Biologists

TURNING roosters into hens and vice versa is the newest miracle to be attempted by science. Working at the Biological Institute of the College of France a group of scientists are engaged in a series of amazing experiments on the hypophysis gland, a small gland situated at the base of the brain.

It is their belief that by transplanting this gland from the body of a rooster into the body of a hen a complete change of sex will be effected.

In early experiments conducted on various breeds of poultry French Biologists have succeeded in proving their contention.

.
RAISING RABBITS for PROFIT (Aug, 1938)

RAISING RABBITS for PROFIT

RAISING rabbits for the market is a back-yard industry that has grown to million dollar proportions in the last few years. It is estimated that rabbit owners are receiving five million dollars annually from meat and fur, with the demand still going up.

In the past raising rabbits was simply a hobby, but now many people are devoting all their time to the small animals. Small initial capital, the small amount of space required, and the rapid development of rabbits to market size are factors that have stimulated the industry.

To get into the business you should first investigate marketing arrangements in your area. In some places slaughter houses that specialize in rabbits call for the live animals when they are ready. In other localities you arrange with a butcher to handle the output of your hutches. Domestic rabbit flesh is a delicious, tender meat comparable to breast of chicken.

.
Horse-Meat “Worms” Fool Frogs (Sep, 1940)

Yum!

Horse-Meat “Worms” Fool Frogs

TRICKING frogs into eating horse meat by making them think it alive is the solution worked out by H. L. Parker, of El Monte, Calif., for the problem of diet in domestic bullfrog breeding. For twenty years, Parker has been experimenting in raising frogs as a food delicacy. Recently he decided to try feeding his frogs on a horse-meat menu, since he found it practically impossible to provide the frogs’ natural live diet of vast quantities of minnows, insects, and earthworms. He contracted with the owner of a near-by lion farm for a supply of horse meat, the regular food of captive lions. This he chopped into strips about the size of worms and tossed into his concrete frog tanks.

.
Can Fish Hear? STRANGE TESTS GAUGE SENSES OF DUMB CREATURES (Jul, 1936)

Can Fish Hear?

…STRANGE TESTS GAUGE SENSES OF DUMB CREATURES

“DUMB” animals are learning to talk. Not by ord of mouth, but in roundabout ways they are telling scientists how they feel, what they see and hear, and even what they think about. Age-old mysteries—always the source of controversy—are evaporating as research workers peer into the minds of inarticulate creatures.

Only recently have experimenters succeeded in hurdling what has long been an insurmountable obstacle— the fact that animals, unlike human laboratory subjects, cannot give verbal reports of their experiences and emotions. Through ingenious artifices that establish, in effect, a common language between the animals and their investigators, their innermost sensations are now being revealed.

.