Archive
Animals
Electronic Leash Shocks Sense Into Fido (Aug, 1960)

Electronic Leash Shocks Sense Into Fido
AN electronic device, called Electro-Leash, can literally shock sense into your pooch —shaping him into a show dog or simply teaching him to behave around the house.

The obedience trainer consists of a palm-sized, transistorized pulse generator, 50 feet of wire which also serves as the leash and a dog collar with two tiny electrodes.

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Chicken Guests Fill Miami Hotel (Jan, 1935)

Chicken Guests Fill Miami Hotel
ABANDONED by a real estate syndicate, a Miami hotel has been turned into one of the world’s largest and most palatial chicken coops by the ingenuity of Maurice R. Harrison, graduate engineer turned poul-tryman.
Securing a long-term lease on the property following its abandonment by the original owners, Harrison installed batteries of wire cages and promptly populated the hotel with about 60,000 chickens.
Each hen has an individual compartment, supplied with a private feed trough and a drinking fountain of freshly flowing water. Floors of the laying cages are slightly at an angle, permitting eggs to roll into a convenient trough to speed egg-gathering.

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Muzzle Safeguards Chickens (Jul, 1938)

Muzzle Safeguards Chickens
EASILY attached to a chicken’s beak, a new aluminum muzzle prevents vicious picking, cannibalism and feather pulling. The muzzle is so delicately balanced that it automatically swings out of the way when the chicken lowers its head for eating and drinking, swinging back into a closed position when the bird raises its head. The device thus prevents the chicken from attacking others, or its own body.

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Hearing Aid for Cat (Oct, 1948)

Hearing Aid for Cat
“Unfortunate” heard for the first time recently when the cat’s owner, Mrs. A. H. Cooper of Fort Worth, Tex., had a hearing aid fitted to the feline. The hearing aid is the latest of a series of steps by Mrs. Cooper to improve the life of the unfortunate cat, which was born deaf, crippled in the hind legs and had no teeth until the age of two. The owner massaged the cat’s gums until the teeth finally came through and had a wheeled support built which enables the cat to scoot around the house.

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LOBSTERS ARE LIKE PEOPLE (Jun, 1952)

The Truman one is kinda cute and the De Gaulle one looks like it should be in the Dark Crystal.


LOBSTERS ARE LIKE PEOPLE

Jean Sulpice, Parisian restaurateur, believes that lobsters and people have similar features. These “portraits” seem to prove the artist’s contention.

With a few props (a cigar, glasses and hats) and his lobster shells, the Frenchman created these caricatures of two famous international figures.

ANYONE WHO HAS seen Paris knows about Place Pigalle—and knows that almost anything can be found there. That is why it is no surprise to learn that in the city of artists, one Pigalle restaurateur is an artist who hangs his work from the ceiling. More surprising is his medium—lobster shells!

Page 2 Captions:
Left, no label is needed to identify De Gaulle. Right, not so easy to recognize is the figure of the French president. Vincent Auriol

Fine wire holds the various parts of the figures together in their lifelike poses

Hanging from the ceiling in a somewhat frightening array are scores of examples of the artist’s work in a variety of subjects

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Stuffed Frog Makes Novel Lamp (Oct, 1934)

Stuffed Frog Makes Novel Lamp
NOVELTY taxidermy, in which mounted birds and animals are arranged in special poses to serve as useful articles, is fast becoming a fad in this country. One of the most popular subjects is the frog lamp.

A stuffed bullfrog reclines lazily against his toadstool shade, holding a tiny fish-pole. Swamp grass glued to the base makes a realistic shore line, while a bit of mirror serves as the pool.

Mounted bull-frog fishing on bank of pool under shade of giant toadstool makes attractive table lamp. Taxidermists find great demand for specimens mounted in natural settings such as this. Tiny electric light bulbs are under the shade.

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MONEY in WORMS (Jul, 1955)

MONEY in WORMS
Make thousands of dollars raising- and selling fishworms and crickets—Start in backyard or basement—No odor—No experience necessary. Free Literature —No obligation. Write CARTER WORM RANCH, PLAINS, GEORGIA

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Pooch Is Up to His Neck In Automobile (Sep, 1954)

I’m not sure why, but this just seems wrong to me.

Pooch Is Up to His Neck In Automobile
European cars are small and have no room for large dogs, so an ingenious dog lover has converted the trunk into a roomy traveling kennel. A hole cut in the trunk lid permits the dog to get air and, if he desires, to see where he has been, at least.

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Raise Capons (Jul, 1952)

Friday Animals for profit blogging:

CAPONS
HICKORY ACRES
6-WKS. OLD STARTED
Easy, Profitable to Raise

Wonderful, tender capon meat brings top prices — makes finest eating. Easy to raise in back yard, on farm, or with other chicks. Hickory Acres 6.-Wks. Old Capons are your best buy. Cost less than day old turkeys — easier to raise. Write for prices. information.
HICKORY ACRES CAPON FARM
BOX PM, WINDSOR, MISSOURI

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Raising Milk Goats Is Profitable New Hobby (Mar, 1939)

Friday animals for profit blogging:

Raising Milk Goats Is Profitable New Hobby

AT SYRACUSE, N.Y., a few weeks ago, men and women from all over the United States gathered in solemn conclave to discuss the joys and problems of one of the fastest-growing and strangest business-hobbies in the country— the raising of blue-blooded milk goats. It was the third annual meeting of the American Goat Society, the youngest of three American organizations devoted to goat culture and the registration of goat pedigrees.

Started thirty-odd years ago by a group of goat fanciers who imported a few pure-bred animals from Europe, pedigreed-goat raising now enrolls thousands of fans—including movie stars, farmers, business executives, and housewives. Known officially by the fancy name of capriculture, the hobby already supports three magazines devoted to goat news, three registration societies, and at least a dozen breeders’ organizations. Strange as it may seem to most Americans, who know only the smelly, comical-looking, tin-can-gnawing type of American goat, well-bred European and African milk goats are beautiful, intelligent, and affectionate creatures that remind one strongly of deer. They are scrupulously clean in their eating habits, and make excellent pets. Pure-blooded mature females, or does, bring from seventy-five dollars to $150 each, while a prize winner has brought as much as $2,000. Pedigreed bucks bring even higher prices. Bucks do smell a bit rank, even the well-bred ones, and for that reason must be kept by themselves in their own private barns or stables, but does are entirely odorless.

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