Archive
Communications
Television Newspaper (Jul, 1937)

Television Newspaper

BROADCASTS WORDS TYPED ON TAPE

FLASHING news reports, stock-market quotations, farm prices, and other types of information in printed form, an apparatus recently designed by William H. Peck, New York inventor and former U.S. Navy optical expert, has introduced a novel form of television news service.

At the broadcasting station, an operator types out the items on a continuous translucent cellulose tape which is fed automatically into a cabinet holding the television sending apparatus.

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HUGE CAMERA READS METERS TO COUNT TELEPHONE CALLS (Jul, 1937)

HUGE CAMERA READS METERS TO COUNT TELEPHONE CALLS

Special cameras of new design are taking the place of human meter readers who check and record, each month, the number of telephone calls for which you are to be billed. In the larger cities, a single telephone central office may employ as many as 10,000 individual registers or meters, and teams of clerks have been required to read them. Photographing twenty-five meters at a time, the cameras give a quicker reading and one that is proof against error.

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Charting our own course (Nov, 1961)

Charting our own course

Over the years Gen Tel has become a large and important part of the nation’s vast communications network.

In fact, Gen Tel is today the largest of the many Independent telephone companies that supply a substantial share of America’s great and growing communications needs.

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NOVEL WEEKLY SERVICE KEEPS PHONES GERMFREE (Jul, 1937)

This reminds me of the Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

NOVEL WEEKLY SERVICE KEEPS PHONES GERMFREE

Telephone subscribers in a number of eastern cities may now avail themselves of a service that undertakes to keep the instruments free of germs. Once a week, a uniformed representative calls, undoes a kit resembling a physician’s case, and applies an antiseptic paste that is said to keep the telephone in sanitary condition.

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WORLD RADIO BATTLE LOOMS (Jul, 1937)

WORLD RADIO BATTLE LOOMS

Priceless radio frequencies will be doled out at international conference to be held in Cairo early in 1938.

by Roland C. Davies

AS THE smoke of foreign conflict rises above the horizon, students of world affairs realize that international broadcasting is perhaps the most potent arm of propaganda to dump nations into the inferno of war or to maintain peace.

Almost daily the press tells how foreign nations are using that marvel of modern science to tell the world via short-wave radio of their nationalistic aims, armed strength and economic prestige.

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THIS is everyone’s War… (Dec, 1942)

THIS is everyone’s War… if you are not able to serve in the Army or Navy, you can serve on the production front. Elmer is doing his duty by leaving his non-essential position and taking a job in the war plant.

THE HAMMARLUND MFG. CO., Inc., 460 WEST 34th St., NEW YORK, N. Y.

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New FM Auto Radio (Jun, 1960)

New FM Auto Radio

OUR recent survey “FM Radios for Your Car” (December 1959) contained several reports from leading auto radio makers which stated flatly they had no plans for marketing an FM auto radio. Motorola was one of them. In spite of their former stand—or perhaps because of our article—Motorola is now mass producing the FM-900, a mobile radio that tunes 88-108 mc.

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KENNEDY ANTENNAS… Probe the secrets of inter-stellar space (Sep, 1956)

KENNEDY ANTENNAS… Probe the secrets of inter-stellar space

Somewhere in the nearly empty reaches of outer space, two hydrogen atoms collide. After a 100-million year journey at the speed of light, the signal generated by that accidental collision reaches a super-sensitive radio telescope antenna in Massachusetts and is recorded — and so one grain more is added to man’s knowledge of the universe.

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‘America Calling’ (Jun, 1938)

Given all the steps involved, twelve minutes to set up a call doesn’t seem that long. I wonder what the call cost.

It’s kind of amazing to think that my iPhone has far more capacity than the entire “overseas” telephone network had at this time.

‘America Calling’

How A Transatlantic ‘Phone Call is Made

By A. P. PECK

1. Within an average of 12 minutes after an American subscriber puts in a call for a party in London, the connection is made and conversation is carried on as clearly and easily as if the called party were only a few blocks away. Behind this commonplace occurrence (an average of 50,000 overseas calls are made yearly, 60 to 65 percent of them being transatlantic), there is a vast array of technical developments and their application, aimed toward maintenance of service and speech quality.

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Could You Become a Radio Star? (Oct, 1930)

You probably need to attract a lot of listeners-in to earn that four-figure income!

Could You Become a Radio Star?

By Alfred Albelli

If you have ability as an entertainer, along with a good radio personality, fame and fortune may await you if you can pass the radio audition test, as described here.

NO DOUBT everyone would get a great thrill hearing his name announced over a network of powerful broadcasting stations as the artist who will next entertain the vast multitudes of listeners-in with a song, a string of jokes, or a speech treating subjects of interest to the nation. And no doubt, also, everyone would get even a greater thrill out of receiving each month a salary and royalty check of the generous four-figure proportions that most radio entertainers pull down.

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