Archive
Communications
Cordless Wonder (Nov, 1979)

Note the “awe-shucks” pseudo-honesty about the phone’s flaws.

Cordless Wonder

For $89.95 the Mura cordless telephone sounds like a bargain. But wait until you hear about its many disadvantages.

It’s about time. For years you’ve seen ads for cordless telephones selling for between three and four hundred dollars.

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Whispering Magic — The Navy’s Wireless (Oct, 1921)

Whispering Magic — The Navy’s Wireless

By DONALD WILHELM

ABOUT the least conspicuous yet most important thing on any ship, especially a Navy ship, is what those on board often call the wireless shack. It’s a small room aft of the bridge, usually, and the most interesting spot on board the vessel.

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London Bobbies Broadcast Crime News With Five-Pound Portable Radio (Mar, 1931)

London Bobbies Broadcast Crime News With Five-Pound Portable Radio

RADIO is fast becoming one of the most dangerous foes of the modern criminal. Often before he has fairly finished committing his crime, the news has gone out to all the police, broadcast over a powerful central radio station and picked up by squad cars cruising the streets.

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TREE TRUNK IS POSTOFFICE FOR ENTIRE COMMUNITY / RIVER JORDAN DAM (Mar, 1924)

TREE TRUNK IS POSTOFFICE FOR ENTIRE COMMUNITY

Covered with letter boxes, a giant tree has been turned into a postoffice by residents of a small community near New York City. Around the single trunk are grouped twenty-eight depositories from which mail is regularly received or collected. Because of its central location, the spot also serves as an open-air civic center and meeting place.

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It keeps faith with your needs (Jul, 1930)

It keeps faith with your needs

An Advertisement of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company

You have found a constantly growing use for the telephone. You have learned its value in business. You have found it helpful in keeping contact with family and friends. Its increasing use has given the telephone its humanly important place in modern life and requires the expenditure of hundreds of millions annually for extensions and improvements.

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A NEW TWIST IN TELEPHONY (Oct, 1953)

A NEW TWIST IN TELEPHONY

For years the accepted way to connect wires to telephone apparatus was with solder. Now, Bell Laboratories engineers have discovered how to make connections faster and better—without solder.

Solder, they reasoned, wouldn’t be needed if wire and terminal could be kept tightly pressed together. But, for economy, this had to be done with the wire alone—without complicating screws and springs.

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What matters bad weather when Radio entertains. (Apr, 1923)

What matters bad weather when Radio entertains.

RADIO’S “every-hour-every-where” broadcast schedule is the most stupendous organization of the means of entertainment the world has ever witnessed.

So responsive have people been to the opportunity of enjoying these programs at their best that Magnavox equipment has become synonymous with the full enjoyment of radio music and speech for an ever-greater circle of satisfied users.

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Radiophone Increases Safety (Jun, 1931)

Radiophone Increases Safety

Thanks to the radio telephone developed for use by airplanes in experiments conducted by Herbert Hoover, Jr., pilots on all modern air lines can now learn every fifteen minutes the exact condition of the weather along their routes.

by JOHN EDWIN HOGG

IF YOU lived within range of the radio station at the Alhambra airport, the plane terminal for Los Angeles, you might tune down to 100 meters on your radio receiver and hear something like this: “Alhambra calling ship 55. Answer please.”

A voice that sounds considerably farther away, but easily audible and distinct, would next be heard.

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Micro-Wave Radio Robot Reports Weather (Jan, 1936)

Micro-Wave Radio Robot Reports Weather

FAR above the heights reached by Settle and Piccard, “sounding balloons” rise into the stratosphere, unmanned, but with delicate apparatus to report the atmospheric conditions they encounter.

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Meter Times Phone Calls (Mar, 1922)

Meter Times Phone Calls

LONG distance telephone calls sometimes end in arguments over the time for which the subscriber should be charged. To eliminate such discussions the French Postal Service has installed meters in public phone booths to give the subscriber fair warning when his period is about to end, and to time the conversation mechanically.

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