Archive
Communications
ONLY A FEW LEFT! U. S. Navy Inter-Communicating Transmitter and Receiver (Jan, 1934)

Modern headsets are just such garbage. When was the last time you saw one that came with a breast plate? And that’s SEVEN POUNDS of quality there. Today you’d be lucky if a headset weighed 7 oz.

ONLY A FEW LEFT!

U. S. Navy Inter-Communicating Transmitter and Receiver

ONLY 50 AT THIS UNHEARD-OF PRICE LEFT

This combination microphone and headset, built under rigid U.S. government supervision, and designed as a regular intercommunicating telephone system, may be slightly modified to match into a radio transmitter and receiver.

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NEW in SCIENCE (Oct, 1949)

NEW in SCIENCE

Glass Boat is a Fiberglas-reinforced plastic assault craft which the Army is putting through rigid tests at Fort Belvoir. It weighs less than 300 pounds and carries 15 men. A World War II plywood craft of the same type weighed over 400 pounds and carried only 12 men. The propulsion unit of this new attack weapon is a neat 33-hp outboard engine.

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THE UNSEEN COURIERS OF THE SPOKEN WORD (Jul, 1931)

THE UNSEEN COURIERS OF THE SPOKEN WORD

The familiar telephone that stands upon your desk at the office or in your home is only a very small part of the great communication system that enables you to talk across the miles with such surprising ease.

Behind it are complicated exchanges, a carefully trained organization of more than four hundred thousand men and women and eighty million miles of wire. These are the forces that make efficient telephone service possible. These are the unseen couriers of the spoken word.

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WRS VHFUHW! (May, 1950)

WRS VHFUHW!

Experts insist that there is no such thing as an absolutely unbreakable code. Here’s how cryptanalysis, the science of breaking codes and ciphers, helped us to win two world wars.

By Wilfred Weiss

AN inventor interested in cryptography recently worked out a complicated device to encode and decode messages. With a million dollars worth of backing, he spent almost ten years in an effort to develop this super machine which could produce an unbreakable code. When he finally had it perfected he brought it to Washington, D. C. to be examined by the experts.

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What Happened to the Citizens Radio Band? (May, 1950)

What Happened to the Citizens Radio Band?

Simple licensing procedure has been set up, but equipment meeting government standards is not available at present time. Here’s authentic data for radio and model enthusiasts.

By Robert Hertzberg

ABOUT a year ago, the Federal Communications Commission announced the opening of the “Citizens Radio Service,” the big feature of which was the simplicity of the licensing procedure and the elimination of the technical examination required of operators in all other services. To get a “ticket,” you had only to ask for it, and it didn’t cost a cent.

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OIL FIELD REPORTS SENT BY PIGEON (Oct, 1931)

OIL FIELD REPORTS SENT BY PIGEON
A texas oil man recently solved the problem of getting daily drilling reports from a well being sunk a hundred miles south of San Antonio, and thirty miles from the nearest telephone, by turning to practical use his hobby of raising homing pigeons. A flock of pigeons was taken to the well to bring in reports. Now two birds are released daily, with messages tied to their feet.

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5 amazing RCA TUBE IMPROVEMENTS that put new life in your Radio (Feb, 1934)

5 amazing RCA TUBE IMPROVEMENTS that put new life in your Radio

“BULLEEVE ME!” New tubes do make a difference when you listen to Fanny Brice.

Don’t buy any tubes today without knowing that you are getting these 5 remarkable improvements that will really put new life in your set! These great advances have come out of the RCA Radiotron Company’s laboratories, developed by world-famous engineers for you.

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What’s New in Radio (Oct, 1940)

What’s New in Radio

Seventeen-Tube Radio Has Organ-Pipe Baffle.

A UNIQUE tone filter made up of organ resonating pipes is an outstanding new feature of one well-known radio receiver line. The five graduated pipes are said to triple the baffle effect, giving true depth to music. The powerful 17-tube, five-band chassis with loudspeaker, tone filter and built-in loop antenna can be installed in any large radio cabinet.

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Backing up your Telephone— (Jun, 1930)

This is one of those headlines that would mean something completely different today….

Backing up your Telephone—

To make your telephone and back it up with all the apparatus and supplies needed for your service is a work of infinite variety.

Buying rubber from Singapore, mica from India, conduit from Ohio—Making each year a million telephones, 15,000 miles of cable, switchboards by the trainload—

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The People’s Telephone (Dec, 1924)

The People’s Telephone

The telephone knows no favorites. It does the bidding of the country store and of the city bank. It is found in the ranch house kitchen and in the drawing-room of the city mansion. Its wires penetrate the northern forest, stretch across the prairie, are tunneled under city streets.

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