Archive
Communications
LEARN TELEGRAPHY – “THERE’S MONEY IN IT” (Mar, 1924)

LEARN TELEGRAPHY – MORSE AND WIRELESS

“THERE’S MONEY IN IT”

TEACH YOURSELF in half usual time, at trifling cost, with the wonderful Automatic Transmitter, THE OMNIGRAPH.
Sends unlimited Morse or Continental messages, at any speed, just as an expert operator would. Adopted by U. S. Government, and leading Universities, Colleges and Telegraph Schools. 3 Styles. Catalog free.

If you own a Radio Phone Set—and don’t know the code—you are missing most of the fun.

OMNIGRAPH MFG. CO., 16-22 Hudson St., NEW YORK

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Broadcasting Station Uses Novel Headset (Mar, 1924)

Broadcasting Station Uses Novel Headset

WDAP, the broadcasting station of the Chicago Board of Trade, located at the Drake Hotel, Chicago, has a couple of novel headsets which are used to test the transmission from any point in the studio.

The set is a combination phone and receiver; the receiver unit is a 50-turn coil, wound on a bakelite tube firmly fastened to the head-hand, and connected to a small crystal detector screwed to a piece of wood spanning the top of the tube. With the headset on, the transmission of the concerts, lectures, etc., can be checked from any part of the studio or instrument room, without the necessity of sitting down at the standard receiving set. The connections are simple, and are shown in the upper detail of the illustration.

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BILLIARDS by WIRE (Jun, 1938)

This is a sort of early online gaming.

BILLIARDS by WIRE

College Teams Now Compete in Novel Telegraphic Tournaments

By ARTHUR GRAHAME

PLAYING separately in cities and towns scattered throughout the East and Middle West, teams representing many leading American colleges recently competed in the 1938 intercollegiate billiards tournament. During the entire competition, members of one team did not see their opponents on other teams. As the ivory balls rolled and spun on the green tables, clicking telegraph instruments carried the scores of individual teams to the director of the tournament. When all scores were in, the director wired the team standings back to the competing colleges.

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Vacation Sets Are Compact and Efficient (Oct, 1924)

Wow, the model with a speaker only weighs 21 lbs! That’s practically nothing! I love the picture of the girls rocking out on the beach.

Vacation Sets Are Compact and Efficient

With the growing demand of radio fans for sets that they can take away with them on their vacations, manufacturers have been bending their efforts to the production of neat portable receivers, and two such sets are shown in our illustration.

The smaller one is a one-tube set which weighs only 4-3/4 lb. and is said to have a range of several hundred miles without an aerial, and 1,000 miles or more with an aerial. Batteries, tube, phones, aerial and ground wires are all packed neatly inside the case, which, when closed, resembles a medium-sized camera. The set is easy to operate, and is highly selective.

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Radio Gets Robot Sound Technician (Feb, 1936)

Radio Gets Robot Sound Technician

A ROBOT sound effects technician for broadcasting studios has been perfected to eliminate more than 800 gadgets now required in the presentation of various programs.

The new device consists of two turntables for records and three automatic pick-up arms. Each record is divided into numerous channels, and each channel contains a special bit of sound, such as street noises, gurgling water, railroad trains, and the like.

In the event the program called for a street parade in a large city, one pick-up arm would be placed on a street noise channel, another on the marching feet channel, and the third would pick up martial music.

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LARGEST LOUDSPEAKER HORN FOR AUDITORIUM (Dec, 1930)

LARGEST LOUDSPEAKER HORN FOR AUDITORIUM

Designed for use in auditoriums, the biggest loudspeaker horn yet made has recently appeared on the market. Its twelve-foot opening gives it the appearance of the entrance to a tunnel into which an automobile could be driven. The claim is made for it that it will reen-force notes down to twenty-five vibrations a second and project it with no appreciable loss of tone quality, to the farthest corners of a large concert hall.

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PHONOGRAPH RECORDS RADIO PROGRAM (Dec, 1930)

For some reason You Cylinder never caught on.

PHONOGRAPH RECORDS RADIO PROGRAM

You can make a phonographic record of your own voice or record your favorite radio program through an attachment on a new combination radio and phonograph. The attachment does not interfere with the ordinary use of the instrument for playing a record or program.

For record making, a microphone picks up voices and transmits them to a blank record through an electric “pick-up” similar to the reproducing arm of a standard electrified phonograph.

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WIRE REPLACES WAX IN NEW DICTATING MACHINE (Feb, 1932)

WIRE REPLACES WAX IN NEW DICTATING MACHINE

Unusually clear reproduction is claimed for a new type of dictating machine invented in Germany. In this device the fluctuations of a speaker’s voice, conveyed electrically to electromagnets, leave a moving steel wire traveling through them more or less strongly magnetized according to the intensity of the voice at each instant. To play back the record, the wire is passed through a similar machine where the reverse process takes place and the voice is heard in a pair of headphones. The wire may then be run through a demagnetizer and used again. Wax records are dispensed with, since the wire takes their place. The wire is made of an alloy the nature of which the inventor is keeping secret, but upon which, he says, the success of his device depends. The machine is shown above.

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HEADSET STAND FOR RADIO (Oct, 1923)

The guy who invented this would have been rich if it hadn’t been for those pesky speaker pushers.

HEADSET STAND FOR RADIO
An ornamental wooden headset stand, for use as a distribution center when a number of receivers are used simultaneously, and as a rack for holding the headphones when these are idle, has been introduced. This appliance eliminates any crowding near the equipment. The’ stand may be moved around a room at will, and when the concert is finished, it may be conveniently placed in a corner or closet, out of the way. The outfit has a switch to disconnect any receivers not in use.

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Coast-to-Coast Mail in 15 Seconds (Oct, 1960)

Coast-to-Coast Mail in 15 Seconds

A TV-like facsimile system will transmit mail between Chicago and Washington this fall—with a nation-wide fax mail operation in the offing

By S. DAVID PURSGLOVE

REVOLUTION takes place this fall in the way Uncle Sam handles the mail. Letters mailed in Washington, D. C, will be delivered in Chicago, Ill., the same day —thanks to electronic transmission.

The Post Office Department will put into regular use in October a television-like facsimile system between these two cities and their suburbs. Within seconds after reaching one post office, a letter will arrive in another, hundreds of miles away.

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