Archive
Communications
How News Is Flashed across Nation (Oct, 1924)

How News Is Flashed across Nation

More than Thirty Thousand Miles of Telegraph Wire Linked Up to Tell of World’s Series Games

“STR-I-K-E THR-E-E-E-E! BATTER’S OUT!!”

The umpire’s hand shoots upward and around in a dismissing gesture. The batter throws his bat to the ground. The final man is out in the final inning of the final world’s series game. The Yankees have won. Forty thousand voices raise a great roar and forty thousand people start madly scrambling to get out of the great ball park they paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to get into. But, almost before the umpire has complete d his final gesture, thousands of people in thousands of parts of the country know that the Yankees have won.

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Crosley Musicone (Oct, 1927)

Crosley Musicone

Wire coating represents years research —
WORLD’S FASTEST SELLING SPEAKER

Delicate actuating parts of loud speakers are subject to rust and deterioration. The Crosley patented actuating unit is not affected by the climate. Special impregnable coating covers the wire in the coils. Impervious bakelite instead of cardboard bobbins prevents any retention of moisture. Higher voltage is possible with resultant louder, finer tones.

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WALKER CAN TUNE IN WITH RADIO IN CANE (Mar, 1933)

WALKER CAN TUNE IN WITH RADIO IN CANE

So that a pedestrian may enjoy broadcast programs wherever he goes, a German, inventor, Alfred Mintus, has devised what he calls a “radio walking stick.” Outwardly it resembles an ordinary cane, but the interior contains a miniature receiver and batteries. The user has merely to plant the stick in the ground, adjust a pair of pocket ‘phones to his ears, and listen in, as illustrated in the photograph. It only remains now for the inventor to perfect the apparatus so the pedestrian need not interrupt his walk while listening in, a possibility foreseen by the inventor of the cane.

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AUTOMATIC RADIO CLOCK TUNES IN STATIONS (Dec, 1930)

Wow that looks simple…

AUTOMATIC RADIO CLOCK TUNES IN STATIONS
A radio set that operates itself has recently been perfected in New York. The control board is fitted with a clock that can be set to start or stop the instrument automatically at any hour of the day or night. The same device may be set to bring in any chosen stations by means of metal tabs inserted in the proper slots.

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Miami Has an Electric Nervous System (Dec, 1955)

Miami Has an Electric Nervous System

CAPTAIN Verner Smith pushed the attitude lever and nosed the blimp down closer to the water. Now it was within 50 feet of choppy Biscayne Bay off Miami, Fla., so close that the trailing landing lines of the huge powered balloon almost touched the water. A loudspeaker in the cabin blared: “This is Miami Communications, Vern. What’s happening?”

The sun-browned pilot pulled a control and the blimp nosed up again. “He’s still struggling. Trying to hold onto his boat. Get the patrol boat here—fast.”

The loudspeaker talked again. “The police boat radios that he’s coming over. Stay directly overhead. He’ll sight on you.”

“Check.”

Guided by the blimp, a patrol boat of the Miami Police Department scudded to the rescue scene.

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Radio Pen writes letters of fire on far-away screen (Dec, 1933)

Radio Pen writes letters of fire on far-away screen

By George H. Waltz, Jr.
CATHODE-RAY tube, having a phosphorescent screen, makes it possible to broadcast to a distance messages that can be read as fast as written

SWEEPING across a mysterious screen like an invisible pencil, a beam of electrons recently penned the message of welcome that opened the National Electrical and Radio Exposition in New York City.

Seated before a small black box, Clarence L. Law, president of the New York Electrical Association, wrote his official greeting with a pencil-shaped stylus. Simultaneously, in a far corner of the exposition hall, the words of his message flashed across a screen in glowing script. As though guided by some unseen hand, a weird green spot traced out the luminous letters of fire just as they were written. This was the first public demonstration of the latest wonder of science—the cathode-ray pen.

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FIRST BROADCASTERS USED PHONE (Sep, 1933)

FIRST BROADCASTERS USED PHONE

Who were the earliest broadcasters? Ten years before the first radio programs were put on the air, a group in Chicago., 111., regularly delivered musical programs and news bulletins over the telephone lines of many subscribers. The rare old photograph reproduced below shows these pioneers broadcasting from their studio. Each singer is holding a microphone, while other individual microphones are attached to the instruments. To listen to the music, a subscriber had merely to sit beside the telephone and hold the receiver to his ear. If he received a ‘phone call while listening, the musical program was automatically disconnected.

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PHONE-HOLDING BRACKET LEAVES HANDS FREE (Dec, 1930)

PHONE-HOLDING BRACKET LEAVES HANDS FREE

Acrobatic skill in holding the receiver between shoulder and chin when telephoning, in an effort to free both hands for something else, is no longer necessary if a receiver-holding attachment is fitted to your phone.

The new appliance is merely a bracket that bolts to the phone back of the transmitter and holds the receiver at the proper elevatiou and angle for convenient use. Slipping back a latch releases the hook and opens the line. When the call is completed, pressing down the hook automatically- locks it shut. The holder attaches in place of the rivet found behind the transmitter.

The device should prove particularly welcome when it is necessary to “hold the wire” for a considerable time.

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The Birth of a Station (Dec, 1936)

The Birth of a Station

THE hush of early morning is broken only by the staccato beat of an isolated gasoline engine in a tent in an alfalfa field just beyond the city limits. A sleepy radio operator reads the meters of a portable transmitter arid makes an entry in his log. “One more hour,” he yawns, “and the job is finished.”

On the other side of town a mysterious looking car pulls up at a corner. The driver reads the street names, marks the spot on a map, then snaps on a complicated looking receiving set hung from the roof behind his seat. No sound comes forth. Instead, the needles of two meters swing across the scales. Rotating the loop aerial protruding through the roof, the driver secures maximum reading, makes a note of it, then goes on down the street.

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First Telephone Used to Help Escaping Slaves (Nov, 1933)

First Telephone Used to Help Escaping Slaves

America’s oldest telephone, pictured here, was used before the Civil War by abolitionists who helped negroes escape. It consisted of a wire attached between drumlike boxes containing diaphragms. A ringing bell announced that a message was to be sent.

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