Archive
Communications
PROFESSIONAL TELEGRAPH PRACTICE SET (Feb, 1947)

Send and Receive Code with this PROFESSIONAL TELEGRAPH PRACTICE SET

Same as used by U. S, Signal Corps.

Learn code quickly and have loads of fun with your “private” intercom system.
Only $9.95 Complete with everything.

No distance limit between stations. Send $2.00 with order, pay balance to postman.
Satisfaction Guaranteed!
AUDIO SALES CO.
11 WARREN ST. NEW YORK 7, N. Y.

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Selsyn-Powered Intercom (Jul, 1947)

Selsyn-Powered Intercom

Spells Out Messages

SOME of those mysterious little gadgets that made certain war equipment seem almost like magic are finding their way to the sales counters as surplus goods. One of them is the selsyn, that onetime highly secret device used in antiaircraft weapons, bomb sights, and radar. Selsyns in small sizes can be picked up in dozens of stores now for between $3 and $5, and many of them will operate on ordinary 115-volt A.C.

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How PHONOGRAPH RECORDS are made (Feb, 1947)

How PHONOGRAPH RECORDS are made

PSM Picture Story by ROBERT F. SMITH and HARRY SAMUELS
THE silent black disk that makes noises when needled is chiefly shellac, lampblack and limestone. In its manufacture, however, pure gold, wax, glass, copper, nickel and sometimes chromium are used by the craftsmen who operate the intricate and delicate machines that squeeze sound into a scratch.

From beginning to end, the commercial manufacture of records is a tremendously exacting process. For example, 50 percent of the wax-coated glass disks on which the music is recorded are rejected before reaching the cutting room. The accompanying pictures tell the story.

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Phone Aids Free Hands (Jan, 1948)

Wow, that is one big ass speakerphone.

Phone Aids Free Hands

The busy executive can now carry on conversations over the telephone without even lifting a finger to hold it. With the Jordaphone (PSM, Oct. ’45, p. 96), a wartime development of the Jordanoff Corp., he need only transfer the phone from its regular cradle to the special one in the top of the instrument. Here the incoming voice is picked up directly from the phone’s earpiece and amplified through a loudspeaker, eliminating actual wire connections. An ordinary microphone, placed anywhere in the room, transmits the outgoing voice to the mouthpiece.

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Radio Robot Squirts Out 3 a Minute (Apr, 1948)

Radio Robot Squirts Out 3 a Minute

A COMPLETE radio set every 20 seconds is the production goal of this new British automatic machine known as ECME (Electronic Circuit Making Equipment). Nearing completion at the research laboratories of Sargrove Electronics, Ltd., this automaton uses the sprayed-circuit technique to do the jobs of a double line of skilled workers. Wiring mistakes are eliminated, and the machine even makes its own tests, signaling the location of any defects in the circuit.

Plastic plates are fed into each end of the two parallel rows of electronic units shown in the photograph at the top of p. 160. As the plates move down the line, all the necessary inductances, capacitors, resistors, and potentiometer tracks are “built up.” After lacquering, other units automatically insert rivets, eyelets, and studs. When two plates are joined together at the end of the line, they form a complete radio receiver except for a few parts such as electrolytic condensers, tubes, and loudspeaker, which are added by hand. It is claimed that the sets will be both lighter and sturdier than those made with wired circuits.

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REVOLUTIONARY NEW CONCEPT IN TELEPHONE ANSWERING EQUIPMENT (Oct, 1968)

REVOLUTIONARY NEW CONCEPT IN TELEPHONE ANSWERING EQUIPMENT

Perfection in Service Free Telephone Answering equipment at a Low-Low-Direct to Diners Club Members Price

NEW! NEW! NEW! MODULAR CIRCUIT CONSTRUCTION marvel in new electronic design

NEW! All electronic unit— complete with its own Cassette Tape Recorder . . . vastly superior to any phone answering device we sold before and the first time ever offered for sale direct to the public.

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“Key Caller” Speeds Phone Service (Oct, 1936)

I guess that’s one route to keypad dialing.

“Key Caller” Speeds Phone Service
MAKING telephone number connections three times faster than can be done with an ordinary dial device is the work accomplished by a recent London invention. The “key caller,” as machine is called, consists of an instrument resembling a small typewriter.

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What’s New IN ELECTRONICS (Jun, 1979)

What’s New IN ELECTRONICS

BY WILLIAM J. HAWKINS

Game/teacher
Hook Intellivision to your color TV and its preprogrammed software lets you do everything from play games to learn a language. It has 60-by-92-line graphics in 16 colors. With keyboard, it’s $499. Maker: Mattel Electronics, 5150 Rosecrans Ave., Hawthorne, Calif. 90250.

The everything set
It’s a carry-along entertainment and information center—AM, FM, CB, public service, aircraft, and weather bands, three-inch TV, cassette tape—along with a built-in mike and sleep switch. Six D cells power it. It’s $249.95, from Sampo, 1050 Arthur Ave., Elk Grove Village, III. 60007.

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The “Telecolor” Translates Music Into Light (Nov, 1931)

Music visualizations that beat WinAmp by about 70 years.

The “Telecolor” Translates Music Into Light

COLOR has long been a favorite word to describe the quality and the mood of music; perhaps because some individuals inevitably associate a certain chord with a certain color. This is doubtless only an individual peculiarity; because all people do not match the same music with the same colors. However, a scientific means has been found to turn music into light; and thus make a radio program appeal to the eye (even without television), as well as the ear. The new invention, the “tele-color” shown here, differs from earlier color organs, such as the “clavilux,” in being automatic in its actions.

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Radio Set Is Mother of Chicks (Dec, 1932)

Radio Set Is Mother of Chicks

NOT to a radio expert but to a housewife, Mrs. Johannes Ronn, of Kansas City, Mo., goes the honor of putting to useful service the heat emanating from tubes in a radio set. What she did in effect was to make the set do duty as an incubator. She placed the eggs in a pasteboard box and put the box in the radio. After the proper lapse of time four little brown chicks opened their eyes to the world. The chicks will have the unprecedented honor of calling a radio set their mother.

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