Archive
Communications
Wounded Veterans Discover New Joys in Wireless Music (Mar, 1922)

Wounded Veterans Discover New Joys in Wireless Music

Radio Outfit Now Becomes Hospital “Nurse”

By Armstrong Perry

DO you know what “ether” means to thousands of weary hospital patients these days?

It no longer suggests shock and the painful after effects of an operation. Rather, the word brings thoughts of pleasure, recreation, and amusement. For the radiophone has at last entered the hospital— where, above all places, it belongs—and musical entertainments, broadcasted daily through the ether from dozens of transmitting stations, are now being borne into hospital wards and orphan asylums, bringing comfort and delight to the lonely inmates.

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To communicate voice and data simultaneously the ordinary modem leaves a lot to be desired. (Jul, 1984)

To communicate voice and data simultaneously the ordinary modem leaves a lot to be desired.

Introducing the Tel-A-Modem.

Now you and your personal computer can talk on the same phone at the same time.

Let’s say, for example, certain data you were transmitting via your personal computer to a remote computer user needed some verbal explanation to go along with it. With the ordinary modem it couldn’t be done. Not simultaneously.

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No Static on Micro-Waves (Jan, 1932)

No Static on Micro-Waves

LIVELY interest has been aroused, among television and short-wave enthusiasts, in New York City, by the present activities of the National Broadcasting Company, in regard to experiments on ultra-short waves. Apparatus is being set up in the tower of the lofty Empire State Building, and short antennas erected about its mooring mast. While official information has not been forthcoming as to wavelengths and schedules, it is evident from the dimensions of the antenna that the work is on ultrashort waves, such as are now being similarly tested in Holland and Germany.

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MOBILE STATIONS Broadcast Major EVENTS (Jun, 1937)

MOBILE STATIONS Broadcast Major EVENTS

HISTORY in the making is now brought into the homes of millions of American people through the use of mobile radio stations capable of broadcasting from the actual scene of any major event or catastrophe. Carrying broadcasting and receiving equipment, announcers and engineers, the mobile stations can rush to fires, flood areas, political and other events at a moment’s notice.

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MAGNETS TOSS VOICE BACK LIKE AN ECHO (Aug, 1933)

MAGNETS TOSS VOICE BACK LIKE AN ECHO

When a World’s Fair visitor speaks into the device shown above, an electric echo throws back his words after a pre-set interval up to several minutes. One set of magnets impresses the voice on a moving steel tape, and a second set picks it up. The effect sounds like an echo from a cliff, but undistorted and amplified. Delayed speech is useful in transatlantic radiotelephony, where a speaker’s reply is held up in transit to give relays time to close.

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COMSAT: Communication in the Space Age (May, 1967)

“Seriously, though, the establishment of information grids, connected by relay satellite, has already been proposed. Some authorities think that in less than 10 years a student will be able to dial a local computer on his home telephone and program problems into it.”

That was actually a pretty good guess.

COMSAT: Communication in the Space Age

Not experimental, but commercial, instant worldwide information transmission by satellite
By RAY D. THROWER

In the 17th century, it took about 4 months for news of the New World to reach Europe. Now, with satellite communication, news whips around the globe in seconds. In less than 3 years, instant global communication will be a reality. Advanced communications equipment and the space-age vehicle, the Communications Satellite Corp. and its international partner, Intelsat, are all together responsible for that.

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Wired for Sin – THE VICE RACKET BEHIND THOSE PHONE ANSWERING SERVICES (Feb, 1958)

Wired for Sin – THE VICE RACKET BEHIND THOSE PHONE ANSWERING SERVICES

Bigtown call girls operate freely because slick tele-fronts handle their incoming calls
By JACK MITCHELL

THE TALL, sleeky-dressed blonde got off the hotel elevator and made her way swiftly across the lobby to the telephone booths. Tossing aside a mink stole from her shapely shoulders, she took pencil and notebook from her pocketbook, dialed a number and said softly: “This is June. Any calls?”

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Aquatic telephones let skin divers talk under water (Dec, 1957)

Aquatic telephones let skin divers talk under water

This swimmie-talkie uses water as a medium for sending high-frequency sound waves, on the principle of the hydrophone employed in the early 1900′s for communicating between ships, and in World War I for detecting submarines. Being adjusted here on a frogman, the Aquavox includes a face-mask mike, transducer (on belt, left), transceiver (right), earphones (on thigh). Cotton Associates, Philadelphia, developed it.

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Television Programs Sent on Light Beams (Mar, 1932)

Why would this be better than radio? Isn’t radio already a “fog penetrating light”?

Interestingly this kind of thing is currently being considered, but for wireless networking, though an important distinction being that it is done inside a room, not in the open.

Television Programs Sent on Light Beams

TELEVISION transmitted on a light beam, opening the way to a new era in the art of broadcasting, has been successfully demonstrated at Schenectady, N. Y. by Dr. E. F. W. Alexanderson, noted radio engineer.

In the laboratory tests, instead of the electric impulses being fed into the radio transmitter as heretofore, they were modulated into high frequencies on a light beam from a high-intensity arc.

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Electronically New… (Jul, 1962)

Electronically New…

PORTABLE CLOCK RADIO also serves as alarm. Button under thumb causes light (arrow) to illuminate clock or radio dial. Earphone jack provides quiet listening. Six-transistor circuit has push-pull output. Comes in tan or blue case. Toshiba Model 6TC-485. Clock radio is priced at $59.95 from Transistor World Corporation, 52 Broadway, New York City 4, N.Y.

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