Archive
Radio
Professor Stays Home; Conducts Class With Two-Way Radio (Apr, 1935)

Professor Stays Home; Conducts Class With Two-Way Radio

UTILIZING “micro-waves,” Marconi’s latest discovery in the radio field, Dr. C. C. Clark can lecture to his General Science class a quarter of a mile away without leaving the quiet comfort of his own home.

A receiver in the class-room is tuned to the professor’s lecture, and questions are answered directly as they are relayed over the two-way transmission by the professor’s assistant. Such a device will permit instructor to carry on his lectures even while sick and confined to his home.

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Radio Modernizes the Old Hayrake (Apr, 1933)

This reminds me of something from the movie Young Einstein.

Radio Modernizes the Old Hayrake

THE old hayrake has gone modern, and is now on par with the automobile., Take a look at the photo below and see what happened when a young fellow with a radio bee in his bonnet took it upon himself to modernize the rake.

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Radio Buyers Dictate New Designs (Jun, 1934)

Radio Buyers Dictate New Designs

DETERMINED to eliminate all guesswork, radio manufacturers recently conducted an intensive survey to determine exactly which cabinet designs and mechanical features most appealed to prospective radio
buyers.

Trained investigators recorded thousands of preferences in cities large and small from coast to coast. Out of this mass of statistical data, radio engineers were able, for the first time, to tabulate the likes and dislikes of the American radio audience. The immediate result was a radical change in cabinet design, harmonizing with all styles and periods of furniture. In keeping with the outward refinements, engineers designed new tubes, perfected remote control devices, eliminated aerials, built new speakers and made short wave reception possible in every home.

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HELMET RADIO (May, 1959)

HELMET RADIO

Here’s a receiver worn under the shield of a motorcycle policeman’s helmet. It was designed by Larry Smith, Atlantic City police technician.

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Radio-Newspaper Receiver for Home Use (May, 1939)

Radio-Newspaper Receiver for Home Use

Designed to fit the top of a commercial table receiver which it matches in cabinet style, a complete radio-newspaper receiver for home use has just been placed on the market. All necessary apparatus for receiving and printing news bulletins and pictures transmitted over the air are contained in the unit. The news is automatically printed on a continuous sheet of paper that unwinds from a roll as it is received. The instrument can be used in conjunction with any radio receiver, the manufacturer declares, provided it has an output of at least five watts.

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RADIO TUBE OF METAL CAN BE WALKED ON (Nov, 1933)

Finally, I can realize my dream of making a floor out of radio tubes!

RADIO TUBE OF METAL CAN BE WALKED ON

Proof against the roughest handling, an indestructible type of radio tube developed in England is so sturdy that it may even be stepped on without damage, as shown above. A metal bulb replaces the customary one of glass, maintaining the vacuum and also serving as the anode; glass is used in the tube only to insulate the bulb horn the metal base, The tube is encircled by a metal cylinder for electrical shielding. It is designed for use anywhere but should prove especially valuable in portable sets or others frequently moved.

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OUTLAWS MAY USE SUPER-STATIONS at Sea (Mar, 1934)

Using offshore systems to subvert a communication network to deliver ads for gambling, controlled substances and quack cures. Sure sounds like spam to me.

OUTLAWS MAY USE SUPER-STATIONS at Sea

Broadcasting stations without a country seek new ways to flood the United States with radio advertising barred by federal commission. Two hundred outlaws face war by the government.

by MURPHY McHENRY

RADIO circles on the Pacific Coast were turned topsy turvy not long ago by the; continued presence of a radio pirate ship which had taken unto itself a very popular spot on the dial and started broadcasting without regard for the land stations with which it interfered.

The primary purpose of the unlicensed broadcast station was to advertise the gambling, liquor, and other dubious pleasure activities of the ship upon which it was built—all these activities beyond the 12-mile limit, of course. Thousands responded to the advertising and the owners waxed rich. They found other sundry rackets, such as a fortune telling program, which brought in additional money and finally assumed such an extensive program that one Los Angeles station was threatened with; a complete loss of audience and business because the ship’s radio signal was the more powerful of the two.

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COMPLETE RADIO SET PUT IN HEADPHONES (Jul, 1933)

COMPLETE RADIO SET PUT IN HEADPHONES

Inventive ingenuity has succeeded recently in building a complete radio set into a pair of headphones. No batteries’ are required, since the set uses a crystal detector, which is adjusted by manipulating a small knob on one of the receivers, as shown above. To tune in any station, the user has merely to turn a larger knob at the back of the same receiver, operating a diminutive tuning condenser. The set will operate successfully wherever the cords of the set may be plugged into a convenient aerial and necessary ground connections are possible.

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Radio Set Automatically Tunes in Station When Asked (Apr, 1934)

Radio Set Automatically Tunes in Station When Asked

A RADIO set, recently displayed in London, will tune in on any station it is asked to get.

A few seconds after merely telling the set the name of the station wanted, the program softly comes forth, without tuning noises. One of the wonders of modern radio, it will furnish one with television programs, for it is equipped with a television receiver, too.

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Salt Water Powers Radio (Aug, 1962)

If you build one of these, you too could be this cool.

Salt Water Powers Radio

Battery made of scrap metal and a pill vial runs for months!

By ROBERT E. KELLAND

THE salt-water cell powering this transistor radio has all the advantages of a dry cell, costs only pennies to make, and lasts for months. The complete radio receiver, with battery but less earphones, can be built for $3 or less.

As shown in the photos, the battery delivers about three-tenths of a volt. The radio consumes only 12 microamps while running, and in actual tests ran three days continuously without any detectable dip in volume.

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