Archive
Radio
“Tele-Talkies” in Color Latest Feat in Radio (Dec, 1929)

“Tele-Talkies” in Color Latest Feat in Radio

Radio’s latest surprise, talking pictures in color, will soon be available to every home. Artists are now to literally stage performances in your living room.

A VERY pretty girl in a fancy dress of many colors sat before a transmitter in a certain section of the Bell Telephone Laboratories in New York City the other Jay. Just a few steps away, in an adjacent room, a group of famous scientists and journalists, evincing the utmost curiosity, concentrated their attention upon a television receiving apparatus.

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Radio Aids Driver Trainees (Feb, 1960)

Radio Aids Driver Trainees

High school students learning to drive hear about their “road manners” through in-car radio setup.

BEFORE Flint, Mich., began its driver training program four years ago it had hit rock bottom in traffic safety for cities its size. Now Flint is number two.

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Radio-Telephone Aids Police (Sep, 1935)

Radio-Telephone Aids Police

MOTOR PATROLMEN, through the latest development in police communication, perfected by Bell Telephone laboratories, can now carry on a two-way conversation with headquarters without leaving their cars. The radio car transmitter weighs but 20 pounds, has a power of 5 watts, and is crystal controlled. The sound of the patrolman’s voice automatically puts the transmitter on the air.

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“Handie Talkie” (May, 1945)

If you count all of the transistors and other solid state components, a current model iPhone has something on the order of a quarter trillion parts.

“Handie Talkie”

comes out of its case to show its remarkably compact construction. The 5-tube sending and receiving radio telephone weighs only slightly more than 5 pounds, but contains 585 tiny parts. The batteries which operate it have a life of 12-1/2 hours.

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man, Like UTICA’s Way Out IN FRONT (Aug, 1962)

man, Like UTICA’s Way Out IN FRONT

No other rig manufactured today swings quite like Utica’s. These cats are the ones who first swung with the MC-27 Town & Country, and now it’s the T&C II. Utica Gismotchy Horizontal-Vertical Beam Antenna—Utica Buddy Whip Mobile Antenna—Utica Buddy Ground Plane Antenna When you are looking for the best, “Man, this is the place.”

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Radio-Powered Sky Station (Feb, 1960)

Radio-Powered Sky Station

A loft on microwave power, sky station will provide better communications, better missile-age defense.

THE controlled transmission of energy through space is no longer a dream of scientists or the exclusive tool of fiction writers—it is reality.

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Eight Wheeled Armored Car Is Equipped With Wireless (Jun, 1931)

Eight Wheeled Armored Car Is Equipped With Wireless

THE Tank Corps of the British army has recently adopted an armored car which is equipped with eight wheels and a long distance wireless sending and receiving set.

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The Secret Keepers (Aug, 1962)

The Secret Keepers

The latest methods of radio communications defy detection by any listener —friend or foe

By KEN GILMORE

MOST radio communications systems are like “party lines”—anyone can listen in. But electronics scientists have been working overtime to come up with the equivalents, radio-wise, for the more desirable (and costly) “private lines.” Their objective: to allow our military and government officials to transmit secret information on the air with the full assurance that it can be “received” only by those listeners it is intended for.

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All About Ham Nets (Feb, 1960)

Reading through this I found my self continually wanting to make everything “.net” instead of ” Net”.

All About Ham Nets

By George Hart, W1NJM

Yes, there’s a place for organized “rag chewing,” but the byword of most ham nets is “service.”

ALL over the amateur radio bands you can hear them—between 500 and 1,000 groups of operators calling themselves “nets.” You might hear, for example, one station say: “Old man, you’re interfering with the Podunk Net. Wonder if you’d mind standing by or moving to another frequency so we can clear our traffic.”

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“Enter the Radio Business? …YOU’RE FOOLISH!” they Shouted (Apr, 1933)

“Enter the Radio Business? …YOU’RE FOOLISH!” they Shouted

—yet in a few months I was earning more than any of them You should have seen their faces when I told them that in just a few short months I jumped from $35 to $75 a week.

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