Archive
Telephone
Writing with your voice (Mar, 1947)

Writing with your voice

Years ago Alexander Graham Bell dreamed of “a machine that should render visible to the eyes of the deaf, the vibrations of the air that affect our ears as sound.” He never realized that dream, but his researches led to the invention of the telephone.

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Photographic Record of Telephone Meters (Oct, 1937)

Photographic Record of Telephone Meters
INSTEAD of the usual method of reading and recording the number registered by your telephone meter, transferring this to the accounting department where the record is copied and tabulated and the bills are made out, the newest system consists of supplying a photographic record of your phone number and the meter reading with your bill.

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Cordless Wonder (Nov, 1979)

Note the “awe-shucks” pseudo-honesty about the phone’s flaws.

Cordless Wonder

For $89.95 the Mura cordless telephone sounds like a bargain. But wait until you hear about its many disadvantages.

It’s about time. For years you’ve seen ads for cordless telephones selling for between three and four hundred dollars.

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It keeps faith with your needs (Jul, 1930)

It keeps faith with your needs

An Advertisement of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company

You have found a constantly growing use for the telephone. You have learned its value in business. You have found it helpful in keeping contact with family and friends. Its increasing use has given the telephone its humanly important place in modern life and requires the expenditure of hundreds of millions annually for extensions and improvements.

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A NEW TWIST IN TELEPHONY (Oct, 1953)

A NEW TWIST IN TELEPHONY

For years the accepted way to connect wires to telephone apparatus was with solder. Now, Bell Laboratories engineers have discovered how to make connections faster and better—without solder.

Solder, they reasoned, wouldn’t be needed if wire and terminal could be kept tightly pressed together. But, for economy, this had to be done with the wire alone—without complicating screws and springs.

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Meter Times Phone Calls (Mar, 1922)

Meter Times Phone Calls

LONG distance telephone calls sometimes end in arguments over the time for which the subscriber should be charged. To eliminate such discussions the French Postal Service has installed meters in public phone booths to give the subscriber fair warning when his period is about to end, and to time the conversation mechanically.

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THE UNSEEN COURIERS OF THE SPOKEN WORD (Jul, 1931)

THE UNSEEN COURIERS OF THE SPOKEN WORD

The familiar telephone that stands upon your desk at the office or in your home is only a very small part of the great communication system that enables you to talk across the miles with such surprising ease.

Behind it are complicated exchanges, a carefully trained organization of more than four hundred thousand men and women and eighty million miles of wire. These are the forces that make efficient telephone service possible. These are the unseen couriers of the spoken word.

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Backing up your Telephone— (Jun, 1930)

This is one of those headlines that would mean something completely different today….

Backing up your Telephone—

To make your telephone and back it up with all the apparatus and supplies needed for your service is a work of infinite variety.

Buying rubber from Singapore, mica from India, conduit from Ohio—Making each year a million telephones, 15,000 miles of cable, switchboards by the trainload—

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The People’s Telephone (Dec, 1924)

The People’s Telephone

The telephone knows no favorites. It does the bidding of the country store and of the city bank. It is found in the ranch house kitchen and in the drawing-room of the city mansion. Its wires penetrate the northern forest, stretch across the prairie, are tunneled under city streets.

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SPLITTING HAIRS TO SPEED CALLS (Jun, 1954)

SPLITTING HAIRS TO SPEED CALLS

To triple the voice-carrying capacity of coaxial cable, Bell Laboratories engineers had to create new amplifying tubes with the grid placed only two-thirds of a hairs breadth from the cathode. Furthermore, the grid wires had to be held rigidly in position; one-quarter of a hairs shifting would cut amplification in half.

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