Archive
Computers
The Texas Instruments Home Computer gives you a tutor, an accountant, a librarian, a file clerk and a pro football team in your own home. (May, 1980)

The Texas Instruments Home Computer gives you a tutor, an accountant, a librarian, a file clerk and a pro football team in your own home.

“What do I need with a home computer?” you ask.

Try thinking of it as easier ways to handle dozens of jobs at home – from pawing through that box of receipts in the closet to explaining adverbs to your 7-year-old.

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Fast game… but sure moves (Jul, 1956)

Fast game… but sure moves

One badly played pawn can lose a chess game …. one incorrectly designed part affects an entire plane. Thus, aircraft designers take no chances; they exhaustively check every component, every structure. On a test wing, for example, stresses are measured over and over at up to 500 different points under constantly increasing loads.

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Boeing engineers work with superb equipment (Jun, 1955)

Boeing engineers work with superb equipment

This Boeing-designed computer answers in seconds engineering questions that formerly took weeks. It is one of many advanced facilities that help Boeing engineers solve the challenging problems of tomorrow’s aviation, and maintain unsurpassed prestige.

One out of every seven Boeing employees is an engineer, playing a vital role in designing and developing high-performance airplanes, guided missiles and components of the future. There are varied and truly creative opportunities at Boeing right now for mechanical, electrical, civil and aeronautical engineers, and for mathematicians and applied physicists.

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Amazing ROBOTS Speed CHECK of NATION (Oct, 1930)

Amazing ROBOTS Speed CHECK of NATION

by DR. JOSEPH A. HILL

Assistant Director of the Census Although the population of the United States has more than doubled since the Civil War, Uncle Sam, with the aid of these amazing new machines which do everything but think, completes the count in one-third the time required in 1860.

DURING the past few months, while more than 100,000 census enumerators were counting the noses of over 120,000,000 residents of the United States, hundreds of visitors from every state in the union flocked into the offices of the Census Bureau in Washington.

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Car Computers – new electronic know-it-alls (Jun, 1979)

The state of the art has progressed a bit in the last 30 years or so.

Car Computers – new electronic know-it-alls

Get instant mpg, time of arrival, miles to go, and more—at the push of a button
By BILL HAWKINS

You’ve been on the road for hours. The clock says you’re running late, the gas gauge says you’re running low. And there’s a desolate stretch of highway ahead between you and your destination. Should you take the extra time to look for a gas station or do you continue, hoping the lonely roadway is shorter than your fuel supply?

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HOME COMPUTERS – MUST LIQUIDATE AT FAR BELOW DEALER COST! (Nov, 1979)

HOME COMPUTERS – MUST LIQUIDATE AT FAR BELOW DEALER COST!

By VIDEOBRAIN, with 4K of ROM, IK of RAM. Expandable up to 8K with slide-in cartridges!

At last! Your own Home Computer System for money management education, family entertainment… NOW at a sensationally low liquidation closeout price! Hooks up quickly to your TV (B&W or color). Even if you never touched a computer before, you can easily master the VideoBrain and put its amazing capabilities to work for you!

Price includes console keyboard, 3 preprogrammed cartridges, 2 joystick controls, RF switch box, AC Power Adapter, instruction manual, 1 year warranty.

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Operation Thinking Cap (Dec, 1954)

Operation Thinking Cap

It takes more than a slide rule alone, these days, to perform the computations necessary for scientific problems such as those encountered in atmospheric research. The scientist of today, equipped with modern data-gathering devices, is faced with a stupendous data-reduction task which requires extremely high speed computation. That’s why the Univac Scientific electronic computing system (formerly known as the ERA 1103) has proven to be invaluable to scientists and engineers alike.

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How Smart are Computers? (Nov, 1961)

I wonder what he’d have thought of Watson.

How Smart are Computers?

BY J. R. PIERCE

ACCORDING TO DOCTOR PIERCE: “The chief charm of the computer comes from the mental skill, agility and insight which men called programmers exercise in causing it to solve difficult and fascinating problems. ”
“Though faster, computers are less versatile than human beings, because they are formed of fewer parts. ”
“The principal limiting factor of the computer is human direction in the form of a program which will guide the machine in a given task.”

When I leave my office to confer with the mathematicians at the Bell Labs, I walk along a corridor with a long glass window on the right-hand wall. Through the window I look into a room about ninety feet long and forty feet wide. There I see a digital computer.

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Tattletale computer tells driving faults (Oct, 1968)

Tattletale computer tells driving faults

The computer has been adapted to do an important job of youth education—driver training. The new system was engineered by Raytheon for use in the Aetna Drivotrainer [PS, May '53]. It has three elements—simulated cars, a movie screen, and a console for an instructor, all fitted neatly into a classroom in a specially outfitted trailer. Monitoring individual student performance, the computer flashes word to the instructor when an error is made in driving down a road on the screen.

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Now They’re Printing TRANSISTORS ON PAPER! (Nov, 1968)

I’m not sure what happened with this, but people are now making transistors where paper is actually a functional part of the device.

Now They’re Printing TRANSISTORS ON PAPER!

Flexible circuits printed by machine on paper, aluminum foil, or film may make possible cheap, disposable radios, hi-fi’s, and many other electronic devices.

By W. STEVENSON BACON

Someday soon you may be able to buy a pad of operating electronic circuits just the way you now buy a pad of paper. On its pages will be printed amplifiers, radio receivers, computer circuitry, oscillators—anything you can name. They’ll be so inexpensive you’ll be able to tear them out, use them, and junk them.

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