Archive
Computers
Ad: Ultrasonic Corp. (Sep, 1952)

“These Theories on Automatic Feedback Control are Interesting…but…
When can I use them in my plant?”

The answer is: Plans can be started just as quickly as you can phone us or write us.
Here at Ultrasonic is a skilled staff already trained in diverse applications of automatic control —
. . . with many years of actual experience in using digital and analog feedback control on machine tools and process industry equipment.
If this issue of Scientific American stimulates your thinking … if it makes you want to get the benefits of an early start in this new field for your company . . . then, get in touch with us. Ultrasonic Corporation, 61 Rogers Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
ULTRASONIC CORPORATION
CAMBRIDGE 42 MASS.
AUTOMATIC FEEDBACK CONTROL DEVELOPMENT, EVALUATION AND EQUIPMENT

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Rand Ad: Tomorrow’s Design Today… (Sep, 1954)

Tomorrow’s Design Today…

Airplane design involves a staggering amount of data processing—a seemingly endless number of computations and tests between the drawing board and the production line. Every hour…every day … every week gained here brings the time when the finished plane takes off on its first flight just that much closer. In the aircraft industry, as in many other engineering applications, the Remington Rand ERA 1103 Electronic Computing System has proven how easily it can handle the most difficult research problems. Here are some reasons why leading aircraft builders and other prominent users are counting on the ERA 1103 these days:
Because of its ability to reduce large volumes of data at extremely high speeds, the ERA 1103 is the ideal computing system for scientific applications. Its speed is matched by many other outstanding characteristics: superb operating efficiency, obtained through large storage capacity … great programming versatility… the ability to operate simultaneously with a wide variety of input-output devices … and far greater reliability than any computer in its class. For more information about the ERA 1103, or for information about how you might apply the system to your particular problems, write to …
ELECTRONIC COMPUTER DEPARTMENT, REMINGTON RAND
ROOM 1915, 315 FOURTH AVE., NEW YORK 10

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Calculating Machine is built of Toy Parts (Aug, 1935)

This reminds me of the Tinker Toy computer built by Danny Hillis, though not quite as cool.

Calculating Machine is built of Toy Parts

CONSTRUCTED entirely from the wheels, gears and structural members of a popular construction toy set, an amazing calculating machine at Manchester University, England can do in a few minutes problems which ordinarily would require many days of tedious work by mathematicians. The only other machine of its kind is at Boston, Mass. When experiments on this machine have been completed, Mr. A. Porter and Professor Hartree, its builders, propose to make a larger model, 27 feet long and 12 feet wide.

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Ad: Sylvania & Univac (Jul, 1956)

Sylvania & Univac

“Blueprint for Tomorrow”, “Office of the Future”—these are phrases used to describe Sylvania’s new Univac Data-Processing Center. For Sylvania is creating, with the Remington Rand Univac, a nerve center for its entire decentralized operations. It is utilizing Univac’s electronic speed and unrivalled accuracy to establish a priceless storehouse of up-to-the-minute management information. This will be available for rapid and truly enlightened management decisions at all levels, and at all locations.

Every alert executive should know the significance of this new step towards automation in business. To get the complete story of Sylvania and Univac, write for EL278, “Is This a Blueprint for Tomorrow’s Offices?” Room 1702, 315 Fourth Avenue, New York 10, N. Y.

Remington Rand Univac
Makers of: Univac I • Univac II • Univac Scientific • Univac File-Computer • Univac 60 • Univac 1.20 • Univac High-Speed Printer
DIVISION OF SPERRY RAND CORPORATION

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Ad: Electronic “brains” rely on COPPER! (Nov, 1956)

Electronic “brains” rely on COPPER!
Today, electronic computers pre-test the performance of guided missiles . . . forecast next year’s sales . . . build safer bridges . . . and guide 5,000 freight cars a day through the mazes of 65 trunk lines in a single railroad yard.
You simply dial your instructions to these modern computers; they obey faster than thought.
But they need copper to operate.
Like nerves to the human head, copper wires transmit impulses to and from electronic “brains”. Other vital computer parts are of copper, too.
Perhaps your product doesn’t need to “think” . . . just act. Make it of copper and you make sure of performance no substitute can equal.
COPPER & BRASS
RESEARCH! ASSOCIATION
420 Lexington Avenue, New York 17, N.Y.
… AN INDUSTRY SOURCE OF TECHNOLOGICAL AID. INCLUDING A LIBRARY OF TECHNICAL LITERATURE AND A COUNCIL OF SPECIALISTS
COPPER OR ITS ALLOYS PROVIDE THESE ADVANTAGES:

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New Calculating Wizard (Feb, 1948)

Let’s see 10,000 operations per minute, that works out to about 166.6 hertz. Not mega or kilo, just plain hertz.

New Calculating Wizard
EDSAC, a British cousin of our electronic mathematical brains, such as ENIAC and ED VAC (PS, May ’47, p. 95), will handle 10,000 multiplications a minute. Now under construction at England’s Cambridge University, EDSAC will remember details of calculations and use “judgment” in choosing the best way to reach a result.

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COMPUTER MEMORIES (Jun, 1955)

COMPUTER MEMORIES

A large mathematical machine must be able to store information and refer to it. This requirement has stimulated the evolution of information-storage units based on various physical effects

by Louis N. Ridenour

A computing machine capable of solving problems must possess a “memory” or, less poetically, an “information-storage unit.” The recent history of improvements in computing machines has been largely a history of improving memory devices. No ideal system has yet been found, but there has been a great deal of progress within the past decade, and several promising new developments are on the horizon.

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THERE ARE ROBOTS AMONG US (Dec, 1958)

THERE ARE ROBOTS AMONG US

By WILLIAM TENN

Electronic robots, in one form or another, are influencing our daily lives . . . are we due for an “electronic revolution”?

THE AGE OF SCIENCE has made the word “robot” the focus of popular fears and hopes. The hope is that machines with minds, machines that can talk, think, and work like men, will give everyone a life of leisure. The fear is that robots will replace mankind, that they might run amuck and destroy their masters, that the robots will get us if we don’t watch out. What was conceived as a work-saving machine has become the popular bogeyman of the age of science.

The robot nightmare hasn’t been with us long, a little over 25 years. It pops up in films, in fiction, in newspaper editorials, every time someone develops a more advanced piece of programing for automatic machinery. When Remington Rand unveiled a computer which responded to written commands in ordinary English rather than computer code, prophets of mechanical doom made dire predictions on the future of mankind.

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ERA MAGNETIC DRUM STORAGE SYSTEMS (Apr, 1953)

The RELIABLE Electronic Memory
ERA MAGNETIC DRUM STORAGE SYSTEMS
AUTOMATIC PROCESS CONTROL SYSTEMS
For DIGITAL COMPUTERS
or other
HIGH-SPEED
DATA HANDLING
REQUIREMENTS
Investigate these ERA Magnetic Drum Storage advantages
• Proven dependability
• Large storage capacity
• Alterable yet non-volatile storage
• High speed
Write Today for this descriptive brochure
Engineering Research Associates
Division of Remington Rand.
1902 West Minnehaha Avenue, Dept. 5-4, St. Paul W4, Minnesota
DIGITAL COMPUTERS . . . DATA-HANDLING SYSTEMS . . . MAGNETIC STORAGE SYSTEMS. . . INSTRUMENTS . . . ANALOG MAGNETIC RECORDING SYSTEMS . . . COMPUTING SERVICE

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IBM Ad: Today… Facts Are What Count (Sep, 1954)

I think that Mr. Colbert would disagree.

Yesterday… “The Fates” Decided
In the 6th century, B. C, King Croesus of Lydia was told by the Delphic Oracles he could defeat the Persians. Relying on “The Fates” instead of the facts, he took on an enemy he should have known was too strong for him .. .and he was badly beaten. Lack of facts cost him his kingdom and his freedom.

Today… Facts Are What Count
The recent great strides in military science, pure science, commerce, and industry have resulted from modern man’s ability to determine the facts and act accordingly.
Tremendous advances have been made in the past few years in fact-finding machines. Through electronics, great masses of data that would have taken a lifetime to process can now be handled in a few days. Ordinary volumes of work can be done in minutes.
By making “mathematical models” of specific processes, products, or situations, man today can predetermine probable results, minimize risks and costs.
World’s Leading Producer of Electronic Accounting Machines
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES, 590 Madison Ave., N. Y. 22, N. Y.

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