Archive
Crime and Police
Intoximeter (May, 1947)

Intoximeter tests drivers for drunkenness. Below, Trooper Sam Maclntire of the East Lansing, Mich., post gives the test to a fellow officer who simulates a drunken driver.

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BULLET-PROOF VEST RESISTS FIRE OF THREE PISTOLS (May, 1924)

Doesn’t this still bruise the hell out of you? Who were these “young women” who let people shoot at them?

BULLET-PROOF VEST RESISTS FIRE OF THREE PISTOLS

To demonstrate the effectiveness of a bullet-proof vest he invented, a New York man donned the garment, posed as the target and allowed three policemen to shoot at him at close range. Repeated fire of thirty-eight and forty-five caliber bullets failed to penetrate the vest. The missiles were flattened against the sides of the protector and fell harmless to the ground. Following this demonstration, young women put on the vests and also served as targets.

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POLICE IN BULLET-PROOF CARS PRACTICE SHOOTING TARGET (Jun, 1924)

POLICE IN BULLET-PROOF CARS PRACTICE SHOOTING TARGET

To perfect their marksmanship, the Philadelphia patrolmen assigned to duty with a fleet of fast, bullet-proof automobiles, have been practicing shooting at a target while the cars are in motion. The machines have been assigned to patrol duty as a precaution against criminals who also employ high-powered machines.

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T-Men of the Treasury (Dec, 1936)

T-Men of the Treasury

OLD Tom Quisenberry, desperado and smuggler, a law unto himself in a remote section of the Virginia coast, unwittingly started the existence of the government “T”-men, sometimes called Trigger men, a new law-enforcement agency of the Treasury department that now bids fair to rival the famous G-men of the Department of Justice.

Old Tom violated a smuggling law in 1934. He then shot and killed Corp. Clarence McClary, Virginia policeman who sought to apprehend him, and wounded George C. Fitzpatrick, treasury enforcement agent.

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Modern Card Sharps use Scientific Methods (Dec, 1930)

Modern Card Sharps use Scientific Methods

by ALFRED ALBELLI

All the resources of modern science and invention are employed by the clever card sharp who sets out to fleece a wealthy victim. You yourself, if you play cards, are fair game for a crooked player unless you are forewarned of his methods. In this article Mr. Albelli exposes the clever methods which enable the crooked gambler to cheat without his victim being aware of what is going on.

ONE night last August four men sat down to a congenial game of stud poker in a Saratoga hotel suite, where one pays fifty dollars for a night’s lodging with benefit of bath.

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CAR DRIVER CAN NOW FLASH SIGN FOR HELP (Oct, 1934)

CAR DRIVER CAN NOW FLASH SIGN FOR HELP
Attacked by hold-up men or kidnapers while in his car, a driver using a Detroit inventor’s new alarm signal may appeal to police or passing motorists for help. The signal is lettered with the word “Help.” When not required, it folds up out of sight. When danger threatens, the driver pushes a button and the signal drops down into plain view.

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Gun Ports Guard Police Autos (Apr, 1934)

Gun Ports Guard Police Autos

A GUN port, built into a bullet proof windshield, has been perfected by Carroll Smart, Dearborn, Mich., inventor, and is hailed as a great aid in battling crime.

An officer’s pistol or rifle can be inserted in this port and aimed in any direction desired. The glass is entirely bullet proof.

Thus, in pursuit of bandits, it is no longer necessary for an officer to remain a target by standing on a running board or reaching out from the safety windshield to fire.

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Motorcycle Radio Transmitters Aid Police in War on Crime (Nov, 1933)

Motorcycle Radio Transmitters Aid Police in War on Crime

DURING running gun battles with bandits, British motorcycle police can send radio calls for reserves through short wave transmitting sets.

The sending outfit is the latest police radio equipment for the quick suppression of crime. It is an addition to the usual receiving set tuned to the frequency of a central police transmitting station.

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BULLET-PROOF STEEL INCLOSES NEW CAGE FOR CASHIERS (Nov, 1933)

BULLET-PROOF STEEL INCLOSES NEW CAGE FOR CASHIERS

Electric locks foil hold-up men in a new cashier’s cage for filling stations and small-town banks. Just large enough for one person to enter at a time, it is completely inclosed in bullet-proof steel and fits conveniently in a corner of a room. When the attendant enters to make change, cash a check, or leave a deposit, he presses an electric contact. The door glides shut and locks him in, simultaneously exposing the money drawer and fifteen numbered buttons on a panel above it. Pressing a certain combination of three buttons opens the drawer. It must be shut by pressing another secret three-button combination before the outer door can be re-opened by a concealed electric switch. As the outer door swings open and the attendant steps out, entrance to the money compartment is again barred by a metal curtain.

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Camera On Policeman’s Revolver Snaps Evidence (Feb, 1938)

Camera On Policeman’s Revolver Snaps Evidence

ATTACHED to the barrel of a service revolver, a compact motion picture camera enables a policeman to take action pictures of any person at whom the revolver is aimed. The pictures thus obtained can be presented as evidence at court.

The motion picture camera is triangular in shape and is attached under the barrel of the revolver by means of metal clamps. The lens is directly in line with, and under, the revolver muzzle. The camera is set in action by a slight pressure on the revolver trigger, independent of the firing of the weapon. Due to the compact size of the gun camera device, only a small roll of film can be accommodated at one loading.

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