Archive
Crime and Police
How Oklahoma Agents Put Hot Oil On the Spot (Jul, 1933)

Of course the first thing that came to mind when I saw this article was: “I drink your milkshake”

How Oklahoma Agents Put Hot Oil On the Spot

by ERNEST W. FAIR

“Hot Oil,” in the language of the oil fields, is stolen petroleum. A gigantic conspiracy among unscrupulous producers to loot the restricted Oklahoma fields of their black gold, through such elaborate mechanical methods as secret pumps, buried pipes, hollow cores in shut-off valves, etc., has just been uncovered by Oklahoma militiamen. A complete exposure of amazing secret methods is made in this gripping article.

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The Myth About Scientific Lie Detectors (Jan, 1950)

The Myth About Scientific Lie Detectors

“They’re just a form of psychological rubber hose,” says the author, “but they’re applied with subtlety instead, of the usual brutality.”

By Robert Hertzberg

After undergoing a lie-detector test at police headquarters, Joe McGlook, 37, no home, signed a confession last night admitting his participation in the fatal hold-up several days ago of a gas station attendant on River Road.

ITEMS like that appear frequently in daily newspapers and cause many people to wonder. How do lie detectors work? Do they really work at all?

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COMMENT and REVIEW – Auto Safety – Gun Violence (Oct, 1923)

So apparently the controversy over gun control has a long and oft repeated history.

Also, I love the idea of giving speeders an “insanity test”.

Longer than that.  When Chicago was founded as a town in 1830 apparently one of the first laws passed was a ban on firearms.  New York State passed the Sullivan Act in 1911.

COMMENT and REVIEW

Pistols and Automobiles Kill 20,000.

THE count of the death toll from revolvers and automobiles for 1922 is completed and rolls up the astounding total of 10,000 from pistols and revolvers, and about the same number from automobiles. In both counts many hundred, if not several thousand, who died weeks or months after the accident, and in the case of revolvers, many more who were killed and the bodies concealed and not yet found, were not included.

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New Stop Signal for Police Cars (May, 1932)

New Stop Signal for Police Cars

STATE police in Michigan have adopted a new departure in stop signals to supplant the familiar flashlight command when halting a motorist on the road.

The scheme makes use of a regulation automobile headlight mounted on the right front fender of the police car. The lens is lettered with command to “stop,” as shown in the photo. In operation the police car drives up beside the culprit motorist and switches on the signal, thus commanding by light.

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COPS MAKE FACES IN LOS ANGELES (Nov, 1954)

COPS MAKE FACES IN LOS ANGELES

Victims are putting the finger on criminals with the aid of a new machine that builds-a-face.

By Louis Hochman

IT was a dark, lonely night and the attractive young Los Angeles woman walking down the street had no way of knowing that the man who had befriended her and was walking beside her was a dangerous sex criminal. For three blocks they walked and talked—suddenly the man turned on the girl, beat her mercilessly with his fists and shot her through the head.

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SECRETS OF THE HUSH-HUSH BOYS (May, 1956)

According to this article the Secret Service had about 225 agents at the time. Currently the Secret Service has 3,200 special agents according to the Secret Service FAQ.

SECRETS OF THE HUSH-HUSH BOYS

Since 1865, for your welfare and his own, the U. S. Secret Service man has been a very hard guy to get to know.

By Glenn D. Kittler

WITHIN 24 hours after the attempt on President Truman’s life in 1950, every newspaper in the world carried the story but not one account named the men whose bullets had riddled the assassins. The reason: U.S. Secret Service agents have a passion for anonymity. They are never identified; they are never even photographed, except when one of them near the President accidentally gets into a camera’s view.

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INVISIBLE MARKS SPOT RANSOM MONEY (Jul, 1937)

They’re not kidding when they call the dye “new”.  Ultraviolet fluorescing dyes and paint had been developed by the late Robert Switzer and his brother Joseph in 1934 as described here

INVISIBLE MARKS SPOT RANSOM MONEY
Dipped in a new chemical solution and dried with a hot iron, ransom money is indelibly marked for identification. The preparation leaves no mark that a crook could detect, but the impregnated portion of the bill, which may be simply a strip along the edge, glows brilliantly when a bank teller holds the money under the invisible rays of an ultra-violet lamp.

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THE LOWDOWN ON THE VICE RING OF 300 “STARS” (Nov, 1959)

THE LOWDOWN ON THE VICE RING OF 300 “STARS”

Who’s the “lady” you saw in those filthy movies?

Hold fast! She may be your wife!

Here’s how the chance attendance of an irate husband at a stag party exploded the biggest scandal of smut-on-celluloid

BY CALVIN HUNTER

“MY WIFE IS POSING IN THE NUDE!”

These explosive words came from the lips of an irate New York husband last March. And they set police on the trail of not one — but more than 300! — girls who were taking off all, and many of them giving all, in front of some of the most overheated cameras in the country.

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TINY BULB ILLUMINATES POLICE BADGE AT NIGHT (Nov, 1935)

TINY BULB ILLUMINATES POLICE BADGE AT NIGHT

So that railroad police assigned to yard duty may readily identify themselves after dark, an illuminated badge has been introduced. Flash-light cells mounted on the back of the badge provide current to light a small bulb when the user presses a switch as shown in the photograph above.

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MYSTERY SHIP SUSPECTED OF BEING GAMBLING BOAT (May, 1929)

MYSTERY SHIP SUSPECTED OF BEING GAMBLING BOAT

THE Monfalcone, a mystery ship suspected by the authorities of being a floating gambling palace, was recently towed out of Los Angeles harbor to be anchored at sea off the California coast. The Monfalcone, as shown in the photo below, has no sails or other motive power and must remain where it is anchored. Note the water tank on the deck, furnishing running water for the cabins. Federal authorities are trying to find legal ways of putting the ship out of business.

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