Archive
Crime and Police
10,000 Miles of Trouble (Sep, 1949)

Ah, the valiant border patrol guarding us from “undesirable aliens”. It doesn’t seem like much has actually changed in the last 57 years.


10,000 Miles of Trouble

By Nick D. Collaer
Cheif, Border Partol Section, Immigration and Naturalization Service of the U.S. Department of Justice as told to James Nevin Miller

Here’s the Border Patrol Chief’s own story of our constant fight to keep smugglers of aliens from sneaking in with their human cargoes.

SMUGGLING aliens across our 10,000 miles of boundaries has become a big time enterprise!

Some of the crooks engaged in this illegal traffic are netting juicy fees for helping foreigners crash our gates—up to $1000 apiece for Mexicans, $1500 for Chinese and as much as $1600 for Central Europeans and Hindus.

The Border Patrol of your Immigration and Naturalization Service is confronted with an unprecedented situation in American history, especially along the 2000-mile Mexican border. There, 4600 foreigners, many of them of the most undesirable type, were caught by the San Antonio District officers in a recent two-day period!

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“BASH AN APACHE”?!?! (Jun, 1959)

I’m really not sure what this has to do with Apaches, but damn! Spikes and acid?

“BASH AN APACHE” says this Paris cab driver, showing teeth, nail-studded bully, acid squirter he uses on tough customers

Update:
In the comments Stannous explains the term Apache. It’s actually much more interesting than the picture:

Not the Indians- French thugs:
By 1874 Paris was swarming with vagabonds. Consisting mostly of juvenile delinquents, these ten thousand or so ruffians would evolve into a new generation of street-fighter, banding into a gang which came to be known as the Apache.
The word “Apache” (pronounced “ah – PAHASH”) is a Parisian term used to describe the French street gangs of the early 1900s. The era’s local newspapers often described the violence perpetrated by these gangs as synonymous with the ferocity of Apache Indians in battle.

The typical French Apache was a young, lower-class, pimp-type vagabond with connections to the underworld. An interesting by-product of this underground culture was “Apache dancing” — a type of “street swing” which simulated actions and movements of urban violence, and actually contained combat techniques particular to the typical Apache’s repertoire. This dance was reportedly so violent that participants sometimes died of injuries sustained from being thrown across bars, onto tables, or after being struck with mistimed blows.

Understandably, this form of dancing was confined to the Apache culture, although for a short time it did attract the attention of the upper class, who came to appreciate a toned-down version which was said to be somewhat similar to the tango.

The Apaches most prominently focused on their own form of street combat however. Crude and unscrupulous, yet highly effective, “French Apache street fighting” emphasised the use of elementary street kicks, hand strikes, head-butts, throws, and an assortment of weapons both standard and improvised which included knuckle dusters, knives, razors, scarves, bodkins,,jackets, hats, the Apache gun and even sheep bones!

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The beginnings of ubiquitous surveillance (Jan, 1965)


A Cure For Crime in the Parks

Here is a modern solution to the problem that is plaguing every large city in America today!

By Robert Hertzberg

A COLLEGE professor walking his dog is knifed to death. The small daughter of a foreign diplomat is robbed of her bicycle. A woman pushing her baby in a carriage has her purse snatched.

Where do these crimes take place—in a lawless Suez port town, or in the very heart of America’s richest city? You only have to read the newspapers to know that murder and mugging are frequent occurrences in New York’s famed Central Park, an otherwise beautiful oasis of lakes, playgrounds and trees bounded on three sides by the world’s plushest apartment houses and on the other side by an incredibly overcrowded and festered slum.

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Origins of CSI (Jul, 1953)

This is an excellent 1953 article on the beginnings of forensic science. It covers the establisment of a forensic school at harvard, the switch from untrained coroners to skilled medical examiners and all sorts of modern forensic techniques. It also has pictures of amazingly detailed models made to recreate crime scenes for instructional purposes.

Mysterious Death Their Business

By Richard F. Dempewrolff

Death from causes unknown is a phrase that will drop from its too frequent use in the nation’s homicide files if a new kind of investigator has anything to say about it.

Today, on en upper floor in a remote wing of the Harvard Medical School, an eerie atmosphere hangs over a certain laboratory headed by pathologist Dr. Richard Ford. Called the Department of Legal Medicine, its business is concerned with unexplained death.

Sightless eyes stare at intruders from a row of life-sized plaster heads of murder victims—one with slashed throat, another with a bullet hole drilled through one temple, trickling a painted red stream against its death-white cheek. Beneath them, rows of plaster chest sections are perforated with accurately simulated bullet holes and powder burns typical of wounds inflicted by various-caliber bullets at varying distances.

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Pipe Is Effective Tear Gas Gun (Mar, 1933)

Pipe Is Effective Tear Gas Gun

TEAR gas guns have taken many forms in the past and now the weapon comes out in the form of an innocent looking pipe, which no one could possibly suspect of evil purposes. Fortunately its shape permits it to be held like a pistol. The stem does duty as a barrel to spray the smoke in the culprit’s face, while a small knob on the underside works as the trigger. The pipe may be carried in the same manner as its inoffensive brother. How it is held may be seen from the photo above.

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Black Light and the Criminal (Jun, 1938)

Black Light and the Criminal

Ultra-violet rays, now readily accessible to law enforcing bodies, adds another weapon to the arsenal of the government’s war on lawlessness.

THE use of filtered ultra-violet light for crime detection and identification purposes has been made available by the presentation of a comparatively low cost, yet powerful, efficient and portable black-ray quartz lamp. Specially formulated dark-colored Wood’s glass filters in the front of lamp hold back the visible light emitted by the mercury arc and allow only a concentrated beam of invisible ultra-violet, or “black light,” to pass. This ray cannot be seen by the eye, even in the dark or semi-dark, yet its radiations are absorbed by a wide variety of substances and instantly re-emitted as visible light of constant intensity and color.

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Police Squad Rides Tiny Motor Scooters (Feb, 1939)

This reminds me of Cartman. I can totally see that cop screaming “Respect my authoritah!”

Police Traffic Squad Rides Motor Scooters
A SPECIAL traffic squad mounted on powered scooters is a feature of the Police Department of Inglewood, Calif. Use of the scooters, which can travel at a speed of 30 m.p.h. and cruise for 130 miles on a gallon of gasoline, enables policemen to patrol longer beats more efficiently than they could shorter beats on foot and has decreased the number of cases of motorists who try to “beat” traffic lights at street intersections.

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Neon Signs Identify Police Patrol Cars (Apr, 1939)

Neon Signs Identify Police Patrol Cars

Police cars assigned to the park districts of Chicago, Ill., are now fitted with roof-top neon signs so that motorists may identify them on the road at any time during the day or night. Within park areas, the police automobiles travel at legal speeds so that drivers may spot them and judge their own speed accordingly. Even in heavy fog, the rooftop signs are easily visible, as shown in the photograph reproduced
at the left.

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The Truth About Pot (May, 1968)

This is a surprisingly honest, un-biased and well researched article about marijuana from 1968. It’s kind of sad that essentially nothing has changed in this debate since this article was written.

THE TRUTH ABOUT POT

  • Is marijuana addictive?
  • Does it have bad physical and mental effects on the user?
  • Does its use tend to increase crime?

Here are the conflicting opinions of leading experts on this highly controversial subject.

By Robert Gannon

After reviewing Mr. Cannon’s article on marijuana, “The Truth about Pot,” a consultant for the American Medical Association had this to say: “This is an excellent article. The author has done a wonderful job of making some legislative zealots look ridiculous simply by quoting their exaggerated statements and reciting the disconcerting facts.”

The great debate about marijuana ranks closely behind Vietnam and civil rights as one of the top issues of our time. And as the number of pot users grows, so does the controversy in which marijuana is called everything from a menace to a harmless delight.

    What is the truth about this strange drug? Here is an in-depth report on the nation’s pot problem and what science has learned so far about its effect on those who use it.

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License Plates, now with more Skulls! (Mar, 1939)

I want a skull on my license plate! I also love the girls expression.

Special License Plates Tag Careless Drivers

Special license plates for traffic violators are being considered as a safety measure by Cliff Davis, commissioner of public safety in Memphis, Tenn. If the measure is adopted motorists who persistently break traffic laws will be required to run in their regular licence plates for special tags, similar to that shown in the photograph above, bearing a skull and the words “traffic-law violator.”

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