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DIY
TIN CANS MADE AT HOME WITH SIMPLE OUTFIT (Oct, 1923)

TIN CANS MADE AT HOME WITH SIMPLE OUTFIT

Among the interesting devices lately-put on the market, is one for making tin cans at home. It consists of three small machines that are easily fastened to any workbench. A piece of tin, previously cut to size and shape, is formed by the first machine into a cylinder which is next put into the “seamer,” where it is held by a glass clamp, while the 1/8-inch lap joint is sweated together with solder and a hand soldering copper. The third machine is used for flanging the ends of the cylinder and in crimping on the circular pieces of tin that form the bottom and top of the can. This equipment is comparatively inexpensive, and was developed to meet an insistent demand from localities where the cost of a can factory is not warranted or to which the transportation charges on empty cans are excessively high.

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Surprising Tests WITH Household AMMONIA (Jun, 1933)

Surprising Tests WITH Household AMMONIA

Simple Experiments and Home-made Apparatus Extend Your Knowledge and Speed the Work You Can Accomplish in Your Own Laboratory

by Raymond B. Wailes

IT IS surprising what the amateur chemist can do with a fifteen-cent bottle of ordinary household ammonia.

Being a mixture of ammonia dissolved in water, this pungent-smelling liquid offers an ever-ready supply of ammonia gas for the home laboratory. Even at room temperature, the gas is released from the liquid. By heating it, the experimenter can obtain the gas in larger quantities.

Strictly speaking, household ammonia is not ammonia at all, but ammonia water or ammonium hydroxide. Although ammonia can be liquefied, it is a colorless gas at normal temperatures. The fact that it dissolves readily in water makes the manufacture of ammonia water possible.

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EXPERIMENTAL Arc Furnace MELTS ANYTHING (May, 1933)

EXPERIMENTAL Arc Furnace MELTS ANYTHING

How to wind a simple coil reactance that controls the current, protects the fuses, and cuts down greatly the cost of the electric power

By Alfred P. Lane

HEAT so terrific that no known substance is able to withstand it for long can be developed in your home laboratory with nothing more than a pair of electric light carbons, a small crucible, and some means of controlling the flow of the electric current from the house mains through the arc.

Most electrical experimenters attempt to use an old toaster or electric grill in series with the arc. This works all right, but the current flow is limited to three or four amperes and is greatest when the carbons are in contact and the arc is producing the least amount of heat. Adding another toaster or grill in parallel with the first one doubles the current through the arc, doubles the cost of operation, and still is open to the objection that the current flow is greatest when the arc is least effective.

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Home Tests show Strange Nature of Chlorine (Oct, 1933)

Home Tests show Strange Nature of Chlorine

How to Make Metals Flame and Why Red Flowers Turn White is Explained Here
By RAYMOND B. WAILES

UNTIL you experiment with chlorine, you have missed some of the biggest thrills your home laboratory can give you. Among other things, you can make metals burst mysteriously into flame, remove the color from dyed cloth, and turn a red flower or a scrap of red paper white.

Chlorine, a heavy greenish-yellow gas, is exceedingly active. Few substances can remain uncombined in its presence. Even silver and gold yield to its action under certain conditions. With many elements, it combines with such suddenness and violence that intense heat and a brilliant flash of light accompany the reaction.

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MAKING A SMALL ELECTRIC AUTOMOBILE (Apr, 1924)

MAKING A SMALL ELECTRIC AUTOMOBILE

By E.B. Stack.

THE electric automobile described in this article is not merely a toy, but a real electric car. It was designed and made for children, but will carry a load of four hundred pounds with ease. Every part, while made as light as possible, is strong enough to stand any amount of rough usage. It is ideal for the youngster who is past the coaster-wagon stage, but not yet old enough to be allowed to run the “flivver.”

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HOME EXPERIMENTS (May, 1945)

HOME EXPERIMENTS

SILENCE IN A VACUUM can be demonstrated with a glass flask and a small sleigh bell. Hang the bell on the end of a length of dowel or glass rod that can be pushed through the hole of a snug-fitting flask stopper; then put a little water in the flask, boil it long enough for steam to drive out the air, remove it from the heat, and fit the stopper in as soon as the steam stops expanding. Cool the flask with running water and shake it near your ear. You will barely hear the bell tinkle, the steam having produced a partial vacuum—sound waves will not travel through a vacuum. But let air in and again shake the flask, and the tinkle will be heard clearly.

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A MERRY-GO-ROUND FOR THE ICE (Oct, 1923)

This looks like it would be a blast. Although it does seem like you might eventually cut a large circle in the ice.

A MERRY-GO-ROUND FOR THE ICE

BY L.B. ROBBINS

EXHILARATING sport is furnished open-air enthusiasts by the novel ice merry-go-round described in this article. The device, although it reminds one of an ice boat, is, however, a new departure in ice coasting, the novelty consisting in the fact that the merry-go-round, which is itself stationary, swings the riders, who are carried on sleds, in circles around it. When desired, the cord or rope that holds the sled to one of the revolving arms, is released, and the sled with its rider is sent flying off over the ice. With a good breeze blowing, the merry-go-round revolves with considerable speed, yet is perfectly safe, if constructed according to the instructions. It can be built by anyone who has some knowledge of tools and how to use them, and who possesses enough ingenuity for details of construction.

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How to Set Up Your Chemistry Laboratory (Feb, 1932)

CHEMISTRY: An Exciting and Profitable Hobby

How to Set Up Your Laboratory

By RAYMOND B. WAILES

WITH simple equipment requiring surprisingly little financial outlay, you can build in your home a small chemical laboratory that will provide a fascinating hobby. Here you may amaze your friends with seemingly magical chemical tricks, as by the manufacture of paint that shines in the dark or of writing inks that disappear unless the secret of bringing them back is known. You can manufacture useful things for the home, as soap or liquid court plaster. You can test gold rings and ivory piano keys to see whether they are genuine. If you wish, you can investigate the chemical processes used in industry, with the ever-present possibility of an important discovery. To the real dyed-in-the-wool experimenter, chemicals in themselves are intriguing, and a beautifully colored precipitate or a startling formation of crystals is its own reward for the trouble of preparation.

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DIY Scooters (Jan, 1948)

CRAFTSMEN ON WHEELS

Scooter Has Three Speeds. Before becoming a cadet-midshipman at the US Merchant Marine Academy, William R. Kern welded some 3/4″ pipe, added a few gears, chains, and a 1/2-hp. motor, and came up with the two wheeler shown above. It carries him 80 miles on a gallon of gas at an average speed of 30 m.p.h. A V-belt, the tension of which may be varied by an idler pulley acts as a clutch to engage the three-speed transmission. The latter transmits power to the rear wheel through a chain. Gears were cut on a milling machine and hardened.

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SPORTS RADIO is Combination Cane and Seat (Mar, 1940)

SPORTS RADIO is Combination Cane and Seat

By FRANK TOBIN

CONSISTING of a compact yet powerful battery receiver mounted on a conventional cane-seat which can be purchased for a dollar or two, the radio illustrated forms a handy set for hikers, sports spectators, and campers. The circuit, designed around three of the new American-made midget tubes, consists of a pentode regenerative detector, resistance coupled to a pentode amplifier which in turn is resistance coupled to a second audio-amplifier stage. Regeneration is controlled by a 25,000-ohm potentiometer. Since the commercial type of antenna coil shown in the diagram has no tickler winding it will be necessary to provide one by winding approximately thirty-five turns of No. 38 double-silk-covered wire around the lower end of the long, flat grid coil.

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