Archive
DIY
An Airplane Swing for Air-minded Youths (Sep, 1930)

An Airplane Swing for Air-minded Youths

Swinging back and forth in this miniature plane, youngsters can duplicate in imagination all the feats of world famous aviators—all with absolute safety, of course. The swing is easy to build and will make a very fine addition to any playground.

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SO EASY IT’S SHOCKING, IF YOU USE ENLARGED PLANS (Dec, 1961)

SO EASY IT’S SHOCKING, IF YOU USE ENLARGED PLANS

to build electronic projects. Enlarged size, step-by-step craft print plans—complete with detailed materials lists—are available for the following:

191. TESLA COIL. Produces 70,000 volts at 500,000 cps. Spectacular but safe…………………………………$1.00
227. REPULSION COIL. Defies law of gravity—electromagnetically …………………………………………$1.00

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Luminous Skeleton For HALLOWEEN (Nov, 1941)

Luminous Skeleton For HALLOWEEN

by Ken Murray

Got any friends you want to lose? Just invite them over to your Halloween party and give ‘em the works with this glowing graveyard horror. Right: Gluing parts of the figure carefully to thin plywood.

AN ANIMATED skeleton – that glows brightly in the dark can be used for all kinds of harmless but amusing Halloween pranks. The skeleton is jointed so that a slight shake will cause the arms and legs to swing about in a realistic manner.

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Compute—With Pots (Jul, 1958)

Compute—With Pots

How to MULTIPLY, DIVIDE, ADD and SUBTRACT with simple potentiometer circuits.

WHEN we think about arithmetic, we think about addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Algebra extends the usefulness of arithmetic by employing symbols for quantities. Trigonometry brings into play the relationship between sides and angles of triangles. Using one or more of these three mathematical approaches, most of the design problems encountered in electronic equipment can be solved.

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INDOOR-OUTDOOR DINING TABLE (Jul, 1956)

INDOOR-OUTDOOR DINING TABLE

This modern table and bench set is easy to construct and goes equally well in the garden or breakfast room.

By John Harter

IF you’re the type of person who appreciates the clean, trim lines of today’s functional design, this table and bench set is for you.

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WASHTUB BASS (Nov, 1955)

WASHTUB BASS

The coolest cats dig the solid beat of this crazy, mixed-up tub.

By Ron Anderson

A BASS violin is something you’re not likely to have around the house. Yet the beat of such an instrument adds rhythm to any musical get-together. Here’s one to make that will produce deep, boomy tones comparing favorably with the real thing.

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Voting Machine for Young Citizens (Oct, 1952)

Voting Machine for Young Citizens

YOU can teach your children to be good citizens with this voting machine scaled down to neighborhood size. Rotary, Kiwanis and Lions clubs, youth organizations or junior groups can run a mock election to prepare for adult citizenship—and the clubs can use the machine for real elections of their own officers and leaders.

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Gem Cutting (Jun, 1946)

Gem Cutting

The fine art of cutting precious and semi-precious stones isn’t confined to professionals. It’s also a fascinating and interesting hobby.

BY ANN COLBERT

ONE answer to the question “What kind of jobs can disabled veterans do?” has been given by Matthew and Daniel Rosenthal, who have trained many of them as lapidaries. The Rosenthal brothers are the owners of the Gabriel Williams Company, N. V. research laboratories with an impressive record in the fields of electronics, physics, color design and internal combustion engines.

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PUSHBUTTON BEACH CLIMBER (Jul, 1956)

PUSHBUTTON BEACH CLIMBER

These Long Islanders live only 200 feet from the beach—by their own funicular railroad.

SLIDING down and climbing up a 200-foot, 45-degree sand bluff is fun for the kiddies but poor sport for the whole family—especially if it’s required activity. Anyway, that’s the way engineer Zvi Gezari felt about the only approach to the Long Island Sound beach near his home.

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Marble Chessmen (Aug, 1951)

Marble Chessmen

After two thousand years modern design is applied to the old game of chess.

CHESS, going back into ancient history, got its present name from the Persian word, Shah, meaning King.

Its origin has been ascribed to the Greeks, Romans, Babylonians, Scythians, Egyptians, Persians, Chinese, Hindus, Arabians, Irish, Welsh and the Castilians, and it is mentioned in history as far back as 200 B.C.

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