Archive
Movies
THESE FOREIGN FILMS… (Feb, 1951)

THESE FOREIGN FILMS…

ASKED TO GUESS the name of the movie which has enjoyed the longest run on Broadway in modern times, it’s probable that most Americans would come up with a Betty Grable flicker, or one of the Bing Crosby-Bolt Hope Road films, or perhaps an Abbott and Costello comedy.

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Portable Talking Picture Exhibition Device Perfected (Feb, 1930)

Portable Talking Picture Exhibition Device Perfected
THESE pictures show the new portable talking picture exhibition equipment, a device observers expect to revolutionize educational methods, in that lectures of the world’s greatest scientists, teachers and preachers can now be exhibited in talking movie form in any size school, church, hospital or home and can be set up in any small hall in less than 15 minutes.

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Letters Rain Down in Movie Title (Apr, 1940)

Letters Rain Down in Movie Title

Amateur cinematographers who wish to inject a touch of originality into their home movie titles will find the following trick quite interesting. Unlike the familiar stunt of having groups of letters suddenly fly into view and arrange themselves in the form of a title, this effect is that of a quantity of letters raining past the view. At intervals certain ones affix themselves at random to the easel to spell out the title.

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JOHN WAYNE (Nov, 1954)

When did people stop using the term “houseboy” in a non-sexual manner?

JOHN WAYNE

Discovered by Director John Ford in the late twenties, Wayne progressed from stagehand to star. His simple formula, “Everybody loves a hero,” has kept him gainfully employed in nearly two hundred movies, with no end in sight.

BY MARTIN SCOTT

John Wayne, a balding and rather homely forty-seven-year-old former football player, is one of Hollywood’s three biggest box-office attractions, and has been for the past four years. Yet according to all the accepted rules for success, John Wayne has no business being a movie star.

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ALFRED HITCHCOCK’S “DIAL M FOR MURDER” (Jun, 1954)

ALFRED HITCHCOCK’S “DIAL M FOR MURDER”

IF A WOMAN ANSWERS… HANG ON FOR DEAR LIFE!

WARNER BROS. PRESENT ‘DIAL M FOR MURDER’ THE INTERNATIONAL STAGE SUCCESS.
COLOR BY WARNERCOLOR.

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Double Feature! (Apr, 1960)

First class used to be in back?

Double Feature!

TO ENTERTAIN passengers on their long nonstop international flights, TIA, a French airline, tried to install movies, but could not make them visible simultaneously on both sides of the partition that separates the tourist class from the first-class cabins.

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NOW You CAN SEE Television (Nov, 1938)

Order a film, made by a magazine, to learn about television!

NOW You CAN SEE Television

Excitingly Explained on Your Favorite Screen in the Latest of VITAPHONE’S
MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED
SHORT SUBJECTS

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Cameras go round in circles to take pictures for two fairs (Apr, 1964)

Cameras go round in circles to take pictures for two fairs

Photographers are being kept busy shooting exhibits. Movies filmed in New York will tell the city’s story in a circular theater at the New York World’s Fair. Color slides of Alpine scenes will cover an entire dome at Lausanne’s National Exhibition.

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Beam “Mike” for Outdoor Films (Oct, 1930)

Beam “Mike” for Outdoor Films

Revolutionary in its scope and perfected to the point where it is believed millions of dollars will be saved in the production of outdoor talking pictures, the beam microphone pictured at the left is being used for the first time in the filming of a railroad epic in Montana. The microphone will pick up sounds only from the point at which it is aimed, thus permitting directors to give oral instructions during filming.

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TRICK LENSES ADD COMEDY TO MOVIES (Aug, 1931)

TRICK LENSES ADD COMEDY TO MOVIES

In a little workshop in Los Angeles, Calif., sits a man who for your amusement distorts normal looking movie actors and actresses into freaks. He is James Herron, and he makes the lenses by which strange distorted effects are produced in some motion picture comedies.

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