Archive
Movies
JON WHITCOMB Watches the Filming of the Fabulous Life of Genghis Khan (Nov, 1954)

JON WHITCOMB Watches the Filming of the Fabulous Life of Genghis Khan

Cosmopolitan’s artist-reporter tells how it feels to be part of a $6,000,000 Mongolian horde loose in Utah’s 115-degree heat.

The sun poured down out of a white sky onto the bright orange desert sand, and I could feel little rivers of sweat creep down my neck. Waves of heat bounced off the gaudy Tatar huts dotting the valley. People standing near were wearing fur hats, fur coats, and heavy leather pants.

.
Dramatizing the Unseen by Means of the Movie (Oct, 1921)

Dramatizing the Unseen by Means of the Movie

By WILLIAM B. PHILLIPS

DO you remember back in the days of the “three R’s” when you drew the little single-line figures on the corner of your speller and by “flipping” the leaves caused them to come to life and to go through antics highly amusing if not exactly enlightening?

They’ve changed all that now. With the ever-increasing popularity of the movie, educators and business men have not been slow to realize that those little figures could be made to do something besides fight and fiddle.

.
ARC LAMP CONCEALED IN HAND MIMICS GLOW OF MATCH (May, 1924)

ARC LAMP CONCEALED IN HAND MIMICS GLOW OF MATCH

To give a realistic effect of the flare of a match suddenly illuminating the face of a moving-picture actor, a small electric arc
light has been made that is fitted into a case hidden in the hand. Darkness screens all wires and as the hands are cupped to form a wind shield, the apparatus cannot be detected. The powerful light shed by this small arc brings out the lines and shadows of the face far more effectively than would be possible with a match.

.
‘Rubber’ Make-Up Gives Actor Many Faces (Mar, 1938)

Lucien Littlefield (1895-1960) had  quite the career.  I knew of him from his two totally different performances with Laurel & Hardy.

‘Rubber’ Make-Up Gives Actor Many Faces

NEW FEATURES MOLDED TO SUIT ANY CHARACTER.

A NEW era in the development of make-up for stage and screen is forecast by the introduction of a rubber plastic material that has been adopted for make-up use by Lucien Littlefield, screen star who specializes in character roles. Employed in the manufacture of gasoline-pump hose, printing rollers, and protective coverings for electric cable, the rubber plastic, developed by Du Pont chemists, makes it unnecessary to resort to painful skin-stretching, padding, and other uncomfortable expedients of the type used by the late Lon Chaney when he made himself up for character parts.

.
8MM & 16MM home movies …at NEW LOW PRICES! (Oct, 1952)

The key is not to mix up a, b and c when you hold a screening for the family.

8MM & 16MM home movies …at NEW LOW PRICES!

4 50 Ft. 8MM MOVIES FOR ONLY $4.99

3 100 Ft. 16MM SOUND MOVIES FOR ONLY $9.99

.
YOUTH, the SPIRIT of the MOVIES (Oct, 1921)

Of course David Wark Griffith is better known as D.W. Griffith, a pioneering filmmaker and director of the contraversial film The Birth of a Nation.

YOUTH, the SPIRIT of the MOVIES

By David Wark Griffith

IT is youth that wins war. And it is youth that wins audiences. Often, people inquire why movie stars are small in stature and youthful in appearance. Not all of those that are successful are so little—Constance Talmadge, for instance, is not—yet most of the movie heroines are.

Usually, they are little, and they are young. But why?

.
Get This Home Movie Feature – “BISCUIT BEN” (Jul, 1947)

“Climax when he spreads dough on chest and cuts biscuits.”

This sounds like something dirty that I don’t quite understand.

Get This Home Movie Feature – “BISCUIT BEN”

Ben prepares dinner when wife attends evening bridge club. Gets into hilarious trouble. Climax when he spreads dough on chest and cuts biscuits. Packed with laughs.

“The Pickpocket”
Another feature comedy in which Ben pulls series of insane “hi-jinks” as professional pickpocket.

.
See Your Home Movies on TV (Jun, 1970)

See Your Home Movies on TV

Does the idea of seeing your home movies on television sound appealing? You’ll be able to soon, when the Vidicord, a new British invention that is part projector, part TV camera, becomes available.

You just plug the output of the Vidicord into your TV antenna connection, switch on the set, and sit back. There’s no need to draw the curtains or turn out the lights. If there’s sound on your film you’ll get that, too. And you can hold any frame at the flip of a switch for an instant still.

.
“MAKE-UP” IN THE MOVIES (Apr, 1917)

“MAKE-UP” IN THE MOVIES

Oxen to Order

This was a sudden call on the property man, and for the life of him he couldn’t produce a yoke of oxen for the emergency. Very simple though! All he did was to attach two pairs of horns to as many heifers. These added dignities actually seemed to subdue their skittishness.

.
New Movie Reel Records Sounds for Talkies (May, 1929)

Patent #1846055

 

New Movie Reel Records Sounds for Talkies

ONE surface of this new movie reel records pictures and the other sound waves. It is the latest invention of Frederick W. Hochstetter, Pittsburgh, Pa., and is expected to be of great aid in the further development of the “talkies.”

Material composing the reel consists of fabric which has been made fireproof. It is photographically light sensitive with special emulsions of great reflecting qualities.

.