Archive
Movies
HOLLYWOOD’S MISSING LINK (Dec, 1952)

HOLLYWOOD’S MISSING LINK
NEED a blind date for your mother-in-law? Steve Calvert, Hollywood’s gorilla man, is your answer because he’s really handsome when he’s all dressed up in his $1,500 hirsute suit. Actually he makes a nice living using it in horror and jungle movies. And it’s a work of art. Each hair, human and yak, is sewed and tied individually. Gorilla curves are achieved by rubber padding. Hands, feet and face are molded rubber. Wires, levers and rods enable him to make his brows beetle, his lips curl, snarl and talk, and can even make his nostrils dilate when he’s real mad.

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The Outlaw (Mar, 1955)

The Outlaw

Here’s why this thrilling new picture has been kept off the screen for two years!

1944-HOWARD HUGHES,WORLD FAMOUS FLYER AND MOTION PICTURE PRODUCER, COMPLETES HIS PICTURE THE OUTLAW.

HOWARD HUGHES DISCOVERED JEAN HARLOW, PAUL MUNI, GEORGE RAFT, AND PAT O’BRIEN. NOW, IN THE OUTLAW, HE PRESENTS HIS SENSATIONAL NEW STAR DISCOVERY- JANE RUSSELL

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TITLE WRITER BOON TO AMATEUR MOVIE FANS (May, 1933)

TITLE WRITER BOON TO AMATEUR MOVIE FANS

Amateur movie-making enthusiasts may prepare their own titles, including animated ones, with the aid of a new title writer. This device, an illuminated stand with an easel at front and a place for the camera at the rear, works in three positions. When set at an angle, as shown above, it permits a hand to be photographed drawing a title. A vertical setting films movable letters for an animated title.

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How Mechanics Make Your Movies (Mar, 1932)

How Mechanics Make Your Movies

by H.H. Dunn

All of the money made in the movies does not go to the big stars and directors. Queer jobs in the studios support a small army of expert technicians.

A LARGE and shiny car pulled onto the lot, and an active young man ran from it into the main building of the RKO Pathe Studio at Culver City.

“‘Big Shot’ director?” I asked.

“Best shot in Hollywood, also director,” answered Bill Rice. “Gets paid every time he misses a star, and he has missed hundreds of them.

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The 1951 MODEL BLONDE (Sep, 1951)

The 1951 MODEL BLONDE

By ROBERT CAHN

She’s filmdom’s Marilyn Monroe: Miss Cheesecake to GIs, whistle-bait in the studios—and an actress on her way up.

IT WAS the kind of family party that Hollywood studios periodically throw for their outlying salesmen and picture-exchange executives in order to whoop up enthusiasm for the company’s forthcoming product. The Cafe de Paris, more simply known as the 20th Century-Fox commissary, was crowded with a cheery assemblage of studio bigwigs and freshly manicured salesmen. For five days, in an atmosphere of backslapping camaraderie, the guests had watched the celluloid unroll, the same films which they were expected to describe as colossal and mean it.

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Mechanical Tricks make Fowl Actors Perform (Mar, 1932)

Mechanical Tricks make Fowl Actors Perform

TWELVE chickens, sitting austerely in a miniature jury box, nodded silently in agreement when asked whether the accused rooster was guilty.

An ostrich opened its mouth as though carrying on a conversation with a white trader.

A myna bird shouted, “Hello, how are you?” to a fisherman.

A rooster dashed into a scene, stopped and crowed. A crow with split tongue talked with apparent intelligence for the sound camera.

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Unique Film Trebles Width of Movies (May, 1930)

Unique Film Trebles Width of Movies

MOVIES three times as wide as usual are made possible by a new lens invention. The principle of the lens designed to widen the photographing capacity of the average movie film three times is much the same as the distorting mirrors at the circus. Set into a copper frame which fits into the front of the camera are finely ground cylinders of glass, one concave, the other convex.

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Crashing a Zeppelin for Fun (May, 1931)

Crashing a Zeppelin for Fun

by DICK COLE

who gives you a look behind the scenes of the most spectacular air thriller ever made.

Jealously guarded secrets of the amazing Zeppelin crash in “Hell’s Angels” now revealed to Dick Cole by Howard Hughes, the producer of this spectacular movie.

“Wasn’t it marvelous! How in the world did they ever take it?”

Such exclamations and questions are heard on every side as a teeming crowd pours forth from a theater after seeing “Hell’s Angels” -—the outstanding aerial war picture of the day. And it is little wonder! For several hours the spectators have been soaring 10,000 feet above the earth in a huge, wartime Zeppelin, or they have been sky-riding in a giant bombing plane.

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DELUXE QUALITY MOVIE VIEWER only $34.95 (Apr, 1980)

DELUXE QUALITY MOVIE VIEWER only $34.95

8MM & SUPER8

COLOR or BLACK & WHITE

• Handles 200′ reels of 8MM and Super 8

• Fully portable-Battery operated

• Adjustable speed-Fast to Stop Action for single frame viewing and editing

• Precision lens-lifelike viewing

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Puppet Movies (Apr, 1941)

Looks a lot like Toy Story.

Puppet Movies

ACHIEVING a third-dimensional effect by combining puppets with actual sets. George Pal, 32-year-old Hungarian, has brought to America a new form of movie presentation. First of his color cartoons reached the screen recently as a nine-minute show.

Instead of drawings, Pal uses wooden characters which perform on tiny sets, with synchronized music, songs, and special effects. Although the actors are puppets, there are no strings; for no Pal puppet ever moves. Instead, the artist places on the set a complete stationary figure for each phase of a movement.

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