Archive
Music
Phono-Film Reel (Sep, 1936)

Phono-Film Reel

A very efficient and cheap new method of sound reproduction

by W. E. SCHRAGE

AS shown by the great number of electrically transcribed programs on the radio, which gave such a setback to the phonograph industry, broadcasting even today relies to a considerable extent on mechanical sound recording.

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AUTOMATIC VIOLIN PLAYER (Feb, 1909)

AUTOMATIC VIOLIN PLAYER

By EMMETT CAMPBELL HALL

AN automatically operated violin, playing music with all the skill of the most trained human hand, is now an accomplished fact, although musicians and even scientists have declared that such a thing would never be achieved.

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Musical Cake Plays a Tune (Sep, 1939)

Musical Cake Plays a Tune
If you start to cut the first slice of your birthday cake, and the cake suddenly begins to play a tune, don’t be alarmed. It’s probably a musical cake of the kind introduced recently by a Brooklyn, N. Y., bakery. A diminutive music box is embedded in the bottom of the cake, and set off when a string is cut with the knife that cuts into the cake. Eighteen separate tunes are available, ranging from “Rockabye Baby” all the way to “Who’s Afraid of the Big, Bad Wolf?”

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PLAYS ELEVEN INSTRUMENTS AT ONCE (Jul, 1937)

PLAYS ELEVEN INSTRUMENTS AT ONCE

Eleven separate musical instruments are played simultaneously by Elmer Trudgen, of Blenheim, Ontario, Canada, with the aid of the novel mechanical arrangement shown in the photograph above. Parts salvaged from discarded bicycles, sewing machines, and automobiles were used to make the foot pedals, levers, and other controls which enable Trudgen to coordinate his feet, knees, arms, wrists, and fingers in rendering a musical selection. The instruments are the piano, violin, guitar, harmonica, bass drum, snare drum, triangle, wood blocks, cymbal, cowbells, and chimes.

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WASHTUB BASS (Nov, 1955)

WASHTUB BASS

The coolest cats dig the solid beat of this crazy, mixed-up tub.

By Ron Anderson

A BASS violin is something you’re not likely to have around the house. Yet the beat of such an instrument adds rhythm to any musical get-together. Here’s one to make that will produce deep, boomy tones comparing favorably with the real thing.

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ONE OF LARGEST ARENAS (May, 1929)

ONE OF LARGEST ARENAS

Hollywood bowl, where thousands of Californians enjoy outdoor entertainments, is one of the largest arenas of this type in the world.

Nine pianos were used at one time in a recent concert, filling the air with entrancing melody. Loud speakers relay the music.

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Musical Tones May Be Made on a Hand Saw (Oct, 1921)

Why is she dressed like an elf?

Musical Tones May Be Made on a Hand Saw

One of the latest fads is to extract music from an ordinary hand saw. The illustration shows how this may be accomplished. Simply hold the saw between your knees, bend the saw with one hand and draw the bow over the edge, as shown. A tone will be the result.

Bending the blade in various curves will produce all the notes of the scale. Different tones may also be made by varying the angle of the bow and its position. Nearer the end on high notes and toward the handle on the low notes.

A little experimenting will enable anyone to produce music from this improvised instrument.

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THESE WASTE BASKETS TELL THEIR OWN STORY (Oct, 1961)

THESE WASTE BASKETS TELL THEIR OWN STORY

Look around. Do your waste baskets show the normal accumulation of a busy, efficient work day or the story of wasted time, wasted effort, wasted supplies? Music by Muzak can help make the difference in your office. Don’t mistake Muzak® with ordinary background music. Scientific studies show how Music by Muzak diminishes employee boredom, boosts office morale, cuts the hidden payroll costs that can eat at company profits.

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Musical Instrument Made of Two Cans and a String (Oct, 1921)

Musical Instrument Made of Two Cans and a String

The illustration shows a very novel and curious “fiddle” made of simple materials and yet a practical instrument to play. This “violin” is simply a long stick to which have been attached two tin cans. Stretched between two holes in the cans is a violin string, it being fastened on one end to a screw so that it will be adjustable to various pitches.

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SEEING MUSIC IN COLORS (Sep, 1915)

SEEING MUSIC IN COLORS

By CHARLES W. PERSON

MAJESTIC harmonies overwhelm the fashionable audience gathered to hear the great composition; the musicians are thrilled by the power of their concerted work; the conductor has forgotten himself in the ecstasy of power he holds over the minds and hearts of those present in the hall. It is a musical triumph.

Over the heads of the musicians stretches a gauze screen, and across this screen play many-colored lights, blending, sweeping onward in overpowering beauty.

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