Archive
Music
This Instrument Will Register Body Reactions of Student Piano Player (Nov, 1929)

I can’t imagine how this would help teach the piano. I think Dr. Johnen just got his kicks by strapping women into weird equipment.

This Instrument Will Register Body Reactions of Student Piano Player

A NEW device has been patented by Dr. Kurt Johnen, Berlin piano pedagogue, which records the motions and bodily reactions of a piano player to determine if the selection is being properly interpreted. A lady is pictured being examined by the device. A pneumatic belt records the change of the circumference of the chest, pneumatic cuffs about the upper arms control the changes of muscle tension, through a hose is recorded the rhythms of respiration and another hose transfers the strength of touch. Dr. Johnen expects this device will aid him in instructing his pupils in interpretation.

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HIDDEN LIGHTS ILLUMINE MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (Aug, 1933)

HIDDEN LIGHTS ILLUMINE MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS

Musical instruments glowing in the dark with diffused light have been introduced to provide a novelty for theatergoers. As the musicians play, the moving light on their instruments offers a striking spectacle. This is enhanced by changing colors in the illumination, which is controlled from apparatus offstage. The photograph above shows how the scheme is applied to a violin, which is studded with concealed electric lights. The bow is also illuminated; a long tubular lamp serves as the frame. Trailing wires lead from the performers’ instruments to the switchboards where lights are managed.ac

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GIANT SAXOPHONE IS SO LARGE PLAYER STANDS ON LADDER (Jun, 1924)

GIANT SAXOPHONE IS SO LARGE PLAYER STANDS ON LADDER

Weighing 500 pounds and modeled accurately after smaller instruments, a huge saxophone was displayed not long ago in California. Securely bracketed to the outside of the manufacturer’s shop, the giant instrument formed an impressive advertising display, and to emphasize its tremendous proportions, a young woman who attempted to play it was compelled to mount a ladder to reach the mouthpiece.

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SINGER CAN HEAR VOICE AS AUDIENCE HEARS IT (Feb, 1934)

SINGER CAN HEAR VOICE AS AUDIENCE HEARS IT

So that would-be singers may hear themselves as others hear them, a Los Angeles, Calif., voice teacher and former grand opera singer has invented and patented a voice reflector. Fitted around the pupil’s neck like a collar, as shown above, its convolutions carry a part of the singer’s tones back to her own ears. According to the inventor, his device will enable singers or public speakers to detect and correct faults in tone, volume, and diction during a few hours’ practice, since they may hear in this way exactly how their voices in singing or speaking would sound to an audience.

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Let’s Play a Tune (Jun, 1930)

Let’s Play a Tune

Every Nation Has Music All Its Own Dressed in the full uniform of the Scots Guards, these experts on the bagpipe are ready to play at memorial or any other special services. The Highlander still clings to his pipes, though there are those who find them slightly less than musical.

There is no escaping the diligent ukulele player. Even in the heart of the Belgian Congo, the uke is strummed; that is, if this strange looking instrument can be called a uke. The player in the photograph is Congo’s champion, and he loves to strum and sing his native African songs.

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Electricity Runs New Player Pipe Organ for Home (Oct, 1931)

“Compact” is not the first word that comes to mind when I look at this picture, but I guess compared to most other pipe organs…

Electricity Runs New Player Pipe Organ for Home

Designed on the principle of the player piano, a compact new pipe organ for home and school plays music automatically from a flexible roll. Because of its unique feature, the “reproducing organ” will bring into the home an entire symphony, which, if played by hand, would require the services of a whole group of artists. All of their movements may be recorded upon a single roll. The organ is expected to be of especial value in schools. Pupils of music appreciation classes are enabled to hear the compositions of masters played by famous musicians and recorded for the purpose. Electric mechanism works the instrument.

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Bugle Call into Megaphone Gets ‘em Up in the Morning (Mar, 1941)

Bugle Call into Megaphone Gets ‘em Up in the Morning

Reveille sounds painfully loud these days to the boys in camp at Fort Jackson, S. C. When the bugler sounds “I can’t get ‘em up in the morning” he steps to a huge megaphone that blasts his notes throughout the camp. Mess call, he finds, does not require so much artificial amplification.

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Pigeon Fancier Equips His Birds for Sound (Jul, 1940) (Jul, 1940)

Pigeon Fancier Equips His Birds for Sound
Birds that play music while they fly are the pride and joy of George Spiegel, Elizabeth, N. J., pigeon fancier. Spiegel attaches special lightweight reed pipes, obtained from China, to the tail feathers of his pigeons. When they fly, a musical whistling flows from their feathers.

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VIOLIN HOOKED TO RADIO SET (Aug, 1933)

VIOLIN HOOKED TO RADIO SET

Stringed instruments without sounding boards, including violins, cellos, guitars, and ukuleles, have been devised by an eastern violin maker. Vibrations of the strings pass through the bridge to a magnetic pickup, resembling a microphone, that converts them into electric currents. These are amplified to operate a loudspeaker. At home the instruments may be plugged directly into the family radio. One of the new violins is illustrated above.

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Maker Of The Maestro’s Wand (Aug, 1941)

Maker Of The Maestro’s Wand

It started as a joke, but Isaac Cary turned it into a business. Whether it’s symphony or swing, the odds are heavy that the leader of the band is using one of Gary’s custom-made batons.

by Lester David

APPLAUSE beats in waves through vast Carnegie Hall as the spotlight picks out the frail little man advancing to the conductor’s stand. He bows deeply and faces the orchestra, arms outstretched. In his hand he holds a slender, white, beautifully proportioned baton. A hush settles on the auditorium … he taps his stand twice, sweeps his baton upward and music flows into the hall. Arturo Toscanini is interpreting a master.

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