Archive
Entertainment
Electric Pony Bucks and Trots (Jan, 1932)

I wonder if they installed it outside the Piggly Wiggly.

Electric Pony Bucks and Trots
A NEW entertainment device which holds lots of fun for the youngsters is an electrical pony invented by Otto Hahs, a mechanic of Sikeston, Mo. The pony is operated by electricity and is set in motion by depositing a nickel in a slot in the neck of the beast. The pony lopes, trots and bucks, the rider regulating the gait with the bridle reins, to suit his tastes.

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Odd Device Makes Music From Air (Aug, 1933)

Odd Device Makes Music From Air
A FRENCH engineer, Rene Bertrand, has developed an instrument which, he claims, will produce music through electrical transcription from the air. How the apparatus operates has not been divulged by the promoters, save for the information that it is far superior to the instrument devised by the Russian scientist, Prof. Theramin. Tone and volume of the music is controlled by the dials on the
two cabinets, while the sounds issue from the two large speakers.

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TOY WALKIE-TALKIE THRILLS YOUNG COMMANDOS (Mar, 1945)

TOY WALKIE-TALKIE THRILLS YOUNG COMMANDOS
THAT young “commando” in your home will be the envy of the neighborhood when he goes out to play war with a toy walkie-talkie like that shown above. For all its G.I. look, the toy is built of scrap stock and a length of webbing or a belt.

The rectangular case is a 2-1/2″ by 3″ by 10″ closed box, with rounded top and bottom pieces overhanging the sides 1/8″ all around. Make the body of two 1/2″ by 2″ by 9″ pieces and two that are 1/2″ by 2-1/2″ by 9″, gluing and nailing the simple butt joints for strength. The mouth and ear pieces shown are turned in a lathe and then sawed off on a diagonal, as shown in the drawing, but if you are good at whittling there is no reason why you can’t shape them by hand. Two dowels form dummy controls on one side.

How the telescoping antenna is put together is shown in the drawing. Drilling the 1/2″ diameter dowel takes great care, and it is best to drill from both ends.
Finish with khaki paint and trim with white as in the photo.—Frank Mccarty.

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Electronic Tick-Tack-Toe (Aug, 1950)

How do you cheat in Tick-Tack-Toe?

Tick-Tack-Toe brain is invention of 18-year-old Noel Elliott, finalist in the Westinghouse science talent search. After three years’ work, involving a study of the 362,882 possible variations, he perfected the machine so that it either wins or ties every game. It responds with a light flash when you pull a switch in any square. Sometimes it’s caught cheating a little.

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TV’s Fabulous Fluffs (Apr, 1950)

It looks like the market was already crying out for YouTube back in 1950. I’m not sure how fans actually “collected” these slips, wardrobe malfunctions and “boners” since there was no good way to record, let alone distribute them.

TV’s Fabulous Fluffs

By West Peterson

TO see or not to see—that was the question. It was one of television’s most embarrassing moments.

Engineers of CBS-TV were on hand with their equipment at the monster reunion show of the Air Force Association in Madison Square Garden, New York City, in October, 1948.

For an hour everything went smoothly. There was a succession of screen stars on the stage. The camera took them in closeup for the TV fans. Then along came Gypsy Rose Lee, the eminent strip teaser.

Would she be a good girl and leave her clothes on? Or would she yield to the clamor of the vets and do something to shock television’s self-appointed censors?

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Play Guitar The Hawaiian Way (Feb, 1940)

Just what I’ve been looking for. A way to play without any of that tedious practice stuff. And who would have guessed the Oahu School of Music would be located in Cleveland?

HOW TO PLAY THE HAWAIIAN WAY
HAWAIIAN GUITAR- Learn to play this EASY. SHORT CUT WAY, right in your own home. No tedious practicing. No special talent necessary. Have fun. Be popular. Surprise your friends. Get “on the air.” Make money teaching others. Hundreds of our students now successful in orchestras teaching, radio. You can do the same.
FREE ILLUSTRATED BOOKLET
“How to play the Hawaiian way” tells all about this quick,
fascinating method. Write today. OAHU SCHOOL OF MUSIC, 2114 Payne Ave., Cleveland, Ohio

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Mechanical Secrets of Marionette Shows Part I (Feb, 1932)

I previously posted part two of this series. You can view it here.

Mechanical Secrets of Marionette Shows
by TONY SARG As Told To Alfred Albelli

When watching a marionette show you’ve probably wondered what made the little mechanical actors appear so lifelike. In this unusual article, Tony Sarg, world’s leading puppeteer, takes you behind the scenes and explains the mechanical marvels which create the amazing illusions of reality you behold on the stage.

MEET the most fantastic troupe that ever strutted across the American stage!

These actors play to capacity audiences in the biggest theatres, yet they don’t get a single red cent for their work!

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SURE ROUTE TO HAPPY-LAND (Nov, 1939)

SURE ROUTE TO HAPPY-LAND

MAIL TODAY SURE
J.C. DEAGAN, Inc., Dept. 3658
1770 Berteau, Chicago
Without cost of obligation, tell me about the easy-to-play DEAGAN MARIMBA… its sensational rise in the music world… the opportunities for radio, stage and dance-band fame.

EASY TO PLAY

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Propeller Drives Homemade Flying Merry-Go-Round (May, 1939)

This thing looks incredibly fun!

Propeller Drives Homemade Flying Merry-Go-Round
A FLYING merry-go-round in their own back yard is the pride and joy of young” Christopher Elliott and his sister Maureen, of Beccles, Suffolk, England. Built by their father, the novel whirligig has a two-passenger open gondola suspended from twin booms that revolve around a central post firmly set into concrete. Driving power for the unusual homemade flying machine is furnished by a one-horsepower gasoline engine that whirls a twenty-three-inch wooden propeller incased in a protective cowling of wire and metal. Cross bracing between booms and center post adds stability.

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How Disney Combines Living Actors with His Cartoon Characters (Sep, 1944)

How Disney Combines Living Actors with His Cartoon Characters

UP GOES another character in the Walt Disney Hall of Fame. Out comes another surprise from the Disney bag of tricks. To be specific, Panchito, a Mexican rooster with as much personality as Donald Duck or Joe Carioca, is making his first appearance; and on the screen with him will be live, three-dimensional actors.

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