Archive
Entertainment
Farnsworth CLOSED CIRCUIT TV (Jan, 1956)

Farnsworth … VISION beyond the range of sight…

Farnsworth CLOSED CIRCUIT TV
“lets you see … where you can’t be”

MORE THAN 30 YEARS experience in electronic television for defense and industry . . . bring you Farnsworth closed circuit television that is second to none! Engineered especially for industrial, educational and commercial use this new, economical medium is saving time, and money in countless applications.

Yours should be one of them . . . Get the facts from Farnsworth.
WRITE DEPT. CT-156 FOR COMPLETE DETAILS
FARNSWORTH ELECTRONICS COMPANY
FORT WAYNE, INDIANA
a division of International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation

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ACTORS’ BREATH MADE VISIBLE FOR WINTER FILM SCENES (Sep, 1934)

ACTORS’ BREATH MADE VISIBLE FOR WINTER FILM SCENES
Motion pictures of winter scenes may be made realistic by a device that makes the actors’ breath visible, just as it would be at low temperatures. The device resembles false teeth. It enables the actors to keep Dry Ice in their mouths without harmful results. The warm breath causes the Dry Ice to give off vapor not unlike that produced by persons breathing in cold weather. The device does not interfere with speech.

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LOUDSPEAKERS IN METAL “MAN” MAKE ROBOT MUSICAL (Sep, 1934)

LOUDSPEAKERS IN METAL “MAN” MAKE ROBOT MUSICAL
By connecting loudspeakers in a sheet-metal “man” to a radio receiver, a musical robot has been produced as an advertising stunt for a New York store. The metal figure, made of stovepipes, galvanized-iron cans and funnels, is installed on the roof. Wires from the loudspeakers located in the hollow arms of the robot are connected to the radio set in the store beneath, enabling the operator of the radio to make the man on the roof sing, deliver a lecture or perhaps tell a bedtime story to passersby on the street.

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THE TRUTH ABOUT TELEVISION (Nov, 1937)

Gee, adoption of a new technology in America held back by patent protectionism? Never!

THE TRUTH ABOUT TELEVISION

Veil of secrecy keeps television from American homes while nearly 5,000 sets are in operation throughout Great Britain.

AMERICANS have always taken pride in their technical superiority. Our proven ability to excel other nations in the rapid development of new industries through the application of machines and scientific improvements has been recognized far and wide. And yet, in the very attractive field of television we are laggards. It is a strange situation and one that has been responsible for much comment by laymen and the press.

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Is Your TV Set Ready for the new UHF Channels ? (May, 1953)

Is Your TV Set Ready for the new UHF Channels ?
This Mallory Converter will equip it to receive all Channels… old and new

That’s right! As new UHF channels go on the air in your area, you will receive them all . . . with no sacrifice of existing channels . . . with no internal changes in your set. The Mallory Converter can be connected to any set in a few minutes, right in your home.

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MOVIE CARTOONS Gain THIRD Dimension (Jul, 1936)

MOVIE CARTOONS Gain THIRD Dimension

MAX FLEISCHER worked a full year to produce 250 feet of motion picture film on one of the first animated cartoons ever to reach the silver screen. Alone, he made thousands of drawings, wrote the story, and did the photography. The animated cartoon was “Out of the Ink Well.” It made movie history just after the World War.

Today he has a staff of 225 people who turn cut a 650-foot animated cartoon every ten days. All of them are in sound, many in color and, latest of all, with three dimensions. The famous “Popeye the Sailor” animateds are leaders in the field; “Betty Boop,” “Ko-Ko the Klown,” and the familiar Screen Songs with the famous bouncing ball are known to every movie-goer. They are released through Paramount Pictures Corporation.

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Parties are twice as much fun when you play the Harmonica (May, 1935)

Is it just me, or do these kids all look a little demonic?

WHERE ARE YOU… Here in the Spotlight or lost among the Crowd?

Parties are twice as much fun when you play the Harmonica

It’s almost unbelievable how quickly you become popular once you can play the harmonica. Good harmonica players are always in demand for parties, outings, scout meetings and school Harmonica Bands—sure of a good time wherever they go. Thousands of boys and girls who once sat around at parties and watched others take the spotlight have discovered that the ability to play this fascinating instrument is all that is needed to win the admiration of friends—step out of the “wallflower” class—and know the thrill of being a wonderful entertainer.

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Very Early Drive-In Theater (Dec, 1934)

According to wikipedia this was the 3rd drive-in to open in the U.S.

California Autoists View Movies in New Open Air Theatre

LOS ANGELES motorists, movie bound, may now sit in their cars and enjoy the latest sound pictures in a giant open air theatre recently completed.

The frame which holds the 40 by 50 foot screen is a structure 72 feet high and 132 feet wide. Three huge loudspeakers, each 22 feet long and 7 feet across the mouth, are mounted on top of the structure. These loudspeakers are directed at the tops of the cars, whose soft fabric is said to make an ideal sounding board.

The fenced – in spectators’ area holds 450 cars which are parked in lanes graded at an angle so that the cars point up at the screen. This inclination enables back-seat spectators to obtain a unobstructed view of the screen. Projection machines are in a low building in front of the screen, said to be the largest in the world. Installed in a lov building in the second row, these machines work at an up-shot angle, instead of the customary down-shot used in indoor theatres.

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Television Will Carry the Mails (Mar, 1935)

Television Will Carry the Mails

By DAVID SARNOFF
PRESIDENT, RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA

A twinkling beam of light records a picture thousands of miles away. It is facsimile transmission- an interesting feature of this authoritative article on the future developments of radio and television.

IN HIS struggle for new information, man has been reaching farther and farther into mysteries beyond his accustomed sphere; farther with the runner through the forest . . . farther with camel caravans across trackless plains . . . farther with ships into uncharted oceans . . . seeking speed, and relishing the advantages of new contacts. From the start, mankind has struggled for better communication.

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Juke Box Gets New Look (Feb, 1948)

Juke Box Gets New Look

A nickel in the slot will buy you one televised prize-fight round if the neighborhood tavern is hep to the latest thing in juke boxes. This is a chrome-and-mirror-bedecked coin phonograph, made by the Videograph Corp., of New York, with a 12-inch television screen added. You can choose your own records in the usual way, but the manager decides whether your five cents will buy a three-minute glimpse of television. And since he operates the controls, he also picks the program. If jive, wrestling, and boxing fans are gathered in one place, he’d better be a Solomon.

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