Archive
Architecture
AUTO “STAGE” DEPOT HAS COMFORTS OF BIG HOTEL (Mar, 1924)

AUTO “STAGE” DEPOT HAS COMFORTS OF BIG HOTEL

To provide comfortable waiting rooms for patrons, and furnish employes with proper quarters, an automobile transport company in the west has built a depot with accommodations that rival those found in modern hotels.

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People Who Live in Glass Houses (Sep, 1936)

Did they give this picture to an intern and say “Here, you have five minutes, write something!”? Because a quarter of the “article” is composed of the owner’s name and genealogy and the headline is just the first half of a proverb that has nothing to do with the piece.

Or maybe the Pinkham’s of Swamscott, Mass were notorious hypocrites, and an editor at Mechanics and Handicraft had been spurned by good old Lydia when she married that Gove bastard…

People Who Live in Glass Houses

Homes, with walls mostly of glass, are products of the new trend throughout the United States, and now, Miss Lydia Pinkham Gove, 48-year-old granddaughter of the late Lydia E. Pinkham, is building one in Swampscott, Mass., at a cost estimated between $20,000 and $25,000. (See sketch at the left.)

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Airplane Field for Tall City Buildings (Oct, 1937)

This is one of those incredibly bad ideas that everyone seemed to have at the same time. Maybe it had to do with the coincidence of a fad for aviation and one for skyscrapers. Whatever the reason, they never really address the catastrophic consequences of a crash, nor the problems of traffic management.

Airplane Field for Tall City Buildings

New invention is expected to solve the problem of providing aviation facilities for large cities. Platforms are designed to operate on the roofs of large buildings and permit happy landings and easy take-offs.

AN invention of J. Herbert Jones of Brooklyn, N.Y., is expected to revolutionize the problem of airplane landings and take-offs in restricted areas, such as on the tops of large buildings, decks of ships, water fronts along the coast, or small land areas.

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MILLIONS SPENT ON RAILROAD STATIONS (Feb, 1909)

MILLIONS SPENT ON RAILROAD STATIONS

By SAMUEL O. DUNN

Western Editorial Manager. Railroad Age Gazette

THE typical American railroad passenger station of the past has been a building so dingy, so ugly and so ill-arranged that travelers wished to see as little of it as practicable and to get through it as quickly as possible.

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BACK TO THE MUD HOUSE (Feb, 1909)

BACK TO THE MUD HOUSE

By H. G. HUNTING

IE word concrete has a sound that would be expected to warn away rather than to attract the housekeeper and home-maker. Its associations are all of the sort that have had little or no interest for women—or for men, either, who are not employed directly in the heavy business of construction and to whom the lore of engineering is a mystery.

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Swinging Buildings to Defy Quakes (Aug, 1936)

Swinging Buildings to Defy Quakes
UNTIL the age of steel construction, no building could be trusted to defy an earthquake; but a steel building, riveted or welded together, will stand quite a wrench without being pulled apart.

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Escape Chute (Apr, 1948)

Escape Chute can evacuate the entire 136-bed Georgia Baptist Hospital, Atlanta, in only a few minutes. In case of fire, patients can be picked up, mattress and all, and slid to safety down the spiral chute.

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MONEY VAULT LIKE FORTRESS IS SURROUNDED BY MOAT / TOURIST CAMP IN TREE TRUNK (May, 1924)

MONEY VAULT LIKE FORTRESS IS SURROUNDED BY MOAT

Surrounded by a deep moat and covered with a bomb-proof roof, a safety deposit vault, constructed on the lines of a medieval fortress and considered impregnable to raids from land or air, has been built for tlie Bank of France. Heavy steel girders, and concrete several feet in thickness, form the top, which is impervious to explosives that might be dropped from aircraft.

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MAN-MADE QUAKES TEST BUILDING’S STABILITY (Mar, 1924)

Wow. The Japanese have been quake testing buildings for a long time. Here’s a video of more recent, slightly larger test.

MAN-MADE QUAKES TEST BUILDING’S STABILITY

Tests to determine the type of building best adapted to withstand earthquakes are made on a machine which reproduces, with realistic intensity, the horizontal and vertical vibrations caused by a genuine tremor.

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Heliport tops World’s Fair restaurant (Jan, 1964)

Heliport tops World’s Fair restaurant

Helicopters for visitors to the New York World’s Fair will land on and take oft from a foot heliport atop a two-level 1,000-seat restaurant and 400-seat cocktail lounge. The building, which covers the Port of New York Authority’s fair exhibit, is supported by columns at the four sides, two of them housing elevators.

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