Archive
Architecture
ARCTIC CABINS HAVE WINDOWS HEWN FROM ICE (Jul, 1936)

ARCTIC CABINS HAVE WINDOWS HEWN FROM ICE

Log shelters constructed in northern Russia for Soviet fishermen have windows of ice instead of glass. Thick slabs, cut from clear ice, were hewn to shape, fitted into the window frames, and frozen in place. Constant sub-zero temperatures keep the ice windows frozen solid throughout the long winter months. Seen from the outside, the ice windows sparkle with the electric lights in the cabin’s interior.

.
Chimneys Blow Smoke Rings (Feb, 1934)

Chimneys Blow Smoke Rings

To add an unusual touch to these Orvieto, Italy, chimneys, they were constructed on spiral lines so that the smoke comes out of them in graceful curves and rings.

.
How Engineers Crowned World’s Tallest Building (Aug, 1930)

How Engineers Crowned World’s Tallest Building

A SLENDER spire of rustless steel tops the 1,046-foot Chrysler Building, in New York City, which officially opened a few weeks ago. Many of those who see the shaft gleaming in the sunlight wonder how it was placed at the summit of the world’s tallest building. On this page our artist shows how this task, one of the greatest of the many engineering feats in the erection of the building, was accomplished.

.
Bizarre Eat Shops Built to Lure Trade (Apr, 1934)

That flower pot tearoom is pretty awesome.

Bizarre Eat Shops Built to Lure Trade

CONES!
An ice cream maker’s specialty is cones. His shops throughout the city are shaped like inverted cones, thus advertising his wares and drawing attention.

HOT DOGS are purveyed by this eat shop, so the showman instincts of the proprietor have caused him to model the exterior of his stand after a puppy.

.
World’s Largest Strongbox (Aug, 1950)

World’s Largest Strongbox

By John L. Kent

UNCLE Sam is storing priceless historical documents in the world’s largest strongbox—the National Archives Building in Washington, D. C.

As a precaution against loss or damage in case of war or other catastrophe, special committees in government bureaus are picking out important records which must be preserved because of their historical value. These are shipped to the strongbox—or to dispersed storage points outside the city.

.
Boxcar Homes for $3 Per Month (Feb, 1934)

Boxcar Homes for $3 Per Month

AN INNOVATION in living quarters is represented in a boxcar village which has recently sprung up in New York City.

Inhabitants of this unique village, pictured below, pay only $3 a month rent, or $6 a week for room and board—reasonable enough in these hard times.

.
Jackie Gleason’s Round House (Apr, 1960)

That’s a really neat looking house.

Jackie Gleason’s Round House

THE MANY TALENTS and accomplishments of Jackie Gleason would put him out of the ordinary class of home builders. And Round Rock Hill, his new home on the outskirts of Peekskill, N. Y., is just that—out of the ordinary. Built on top of a hill in the center of nine acres of dense woodland, the house provides the comedian-composer-actor with “a pattern for living and working” — it contains his office and a broadcasting studio as well as his home.

Everything about the home is round. There’s an eight-foot round bed with a built-in television set in the ceiling above it; a round shower room in glass and tile; round and semicircular rugs and furniture. Even the stairways curve to match the curve of the outside walls. In the center of the round living room is a huge triple fireplace. The studio room focuses on a grand piano.

The house is built on three levels across the 175-foot front elevation. Glass walls everywhere look out over the wooded hills.

.
Ready-Made House Costs $500 (Oct, 1937)

Ready-Made House Costs $500

Equipped with a stove, refrigerator, window screens, dining table, couch, and other home accessories, a new type of prefabricated house costs less than $500. Designed as a first unit to which later additions may be made, the factory-built structure includes living room, dinette, and kitchen, with folding beds for four people.

.
ARCHITECT DESIGNS COTTON HOUSES (Feb, 1933)

ARCHITECT DESIGNS COTTON HOUSES

Houses of cotton are proposed by Lawrence Kocher, noted architect, to solve the low-cost housing problem. Models of two types; a $1,500 five-room home and a week-end house, have been designed. A weatherproof exterior is provided by a roof and walls of fireproofed cotton ducking stretched over a wooden structural frame. Inner walls are also of cotton. Insulating material may be added to exclude heat and cold. Since the canvas is flexible, it is adaptable to any shaped surface.

.
GARAGE BUILT OF AUTO TAGS IS PROOF AGAINST RUST (Jun, 1924)

GARAGE BUILT OF AUTO TAGS IS PROOF AGAINST RUST

Tightly sheathed on roof and sides with unused automobile license tags, a serviceable garage, seventeen feet square and ten feet high, with space for two cars has been built in Denver, Colo. The tags’ were obtained from a surplus of 22,000 left over in the office of the secretary of state. More than 10,000 of the plates, which are rust-proof, were required to cover the structure. They were laid overlapping like shingles upon a rough board siding and a layer of tar paper. A coat of paint was applied to obliterate the numbers.

.