Archive
Architecture
Church Cut In Half To Make Way For New Street (Dec, 1936)

Church Cut In Half To Make Way For New Street

ONE of the most unusual engineering feats in recent years was the moving of a 4,000,000-pound Detroit church steeple to make way for a wider street. The 180-foot stone tower was moved by seven men while hundreds of breathless spectators looked on. Working under the direction of Carl F. Henrichsen and Carl A. Johnson, veteran building movers, the men first cut out a 27-foot section of the church so that the front could be moved back the same amount.

.
Contractors Build Freak Test House (Dec, 1936)

Contractors Build Freak Test House

TO DETERMINE the feasibility and artistic effect of various materials for a group of new college buildings, a test building using many different materials was erected at Principia College, Elsah, Ill From the results gleaned from the novel experiment, the combination and types of material to be used in the construction of the main buildings was determined.

The small test building was constructed of stone, brick, cast concrete, and timber in brick and concrete. One side of the roof was made of concrete covered with slate, while the opposite side was plain concrete.

.
Bedroom on Stilts 10 Degrees Cooler Than on the Ground (Feb, 1930)

Bedroom on Stilts 10 Degrees Cooler Than on the Ground
WHEN A. Winters, a Californian, needed a cooler sleeping place he built a bedroom on top of a forty-foot steel tower, up in the air where the breezes are blowing. The room is large enough for a bed, two chairs and a small table.

.
Canvas House Costing But $1000 to Be Home of Future (Jun, 1934)

Canvas House Costing But $1000 to Be Home of Future

CANVAS is now being considered by architects as an attractive and economical building material for the small homes of the future. Canvas can now be treated with preservative paints to make it waterproof and fireproof.

A summer home which can be built anywhere for less than $1000 uses canvas almost exclusively as a surfacing material.

.
Octagonal Hangar Houses Planes Without Waste Space (Dec, 1929)

Octagonal Hangar Houses Planes Without Waste Space

WHENEVER a new aviation field or airdrome is planned there always arises the problem as to the type of hangar which should be erected. If the aviation field is planned for a small town or for a limited number of planes the problem is simple but when a modern airdrome with unlimited aerial traffic is contemplated, conditions are different.

.
For faster shopping: a Revolator (Jun, 1973)

For faster shopping: a Revolator

Cabs in this people-mover will whisk up and down on a continuous belt—something like a Ferris wheel. The Revolator is planned for a multilevel shopping center that’s being built in Morristown, N.J. Each cab will hold 150 shoppers, so a six-unit system could transport 40,000 an hour—far more than elevators or escalators.

.
The Roadside Stand Goes “High Hat” (May, 1930)

The Roadside Stand Goes “High Hat”

It is easily seen that refreshment – seeking youngsters pick the place that catches the eye.

There is nothing like individuality to create lasting impressions. Here is a group of the once lowly roadside stands. Kinda ritzy, what?

In “going modern,” stand owners are overlooking nothing that will add distinctiveness to their business establishments. To the west goes the honor of pioneering in this movement.

.
Building a “Tarzan” Tree Hut (Aug, 1929)

Building a “Tarzan” Tree Hut

IF YOU want to experience the sensation of a wild ride with the airmail, select a night when the weather man predicts “whoopee,” don a helmet, goggles, leather jerkin, or what have you, and seat yourself in a swivel chair in the highest tree hut you can find. To help the imagination, take along a flash light and a book of airplane adventures. However, you won’t need these after the storm breaks. Boy! Feel those air bumps! You zoom to get above the storm. You roll! You side slip! Then, crash!

.
U.S. Buries 6 Billions in Gold (Apr, 1934)

U.S. Buries 6 Billions in Gold

Protected by water, gas and electricity.

Uncle Sam guards six tons of yellow metal from gangland and foreign foes.

by Ollie M. James

WITH utmost secrecy, Uncle Sam has buried the largest gold cache in history —192,000,000 ounces of the precious yellow metal worth $6,000,000,000. Where he has buried it, however, is no secret.

.
Bombproof Plane Factories ROLL INTO MOUNTAIN SIDE (May, 1941)

Wouldn’t it be easier to just build the factory in the mountain and leave it there?

Bombproof Plane Factories ROLL INTO MOUNTAIN SIDE

Raid Shelters for Assembly Plants: A Swiss Inventor’s Solution to the Problem of Protecting Production AIRPLANE FACTORIES that literally run to shelter from raiding bombers have been invented by Antoine Gazda, noted Swiss armament designer, and erected at undisclosed places in Switzerland by the Pilatus aircraft concern as a national-defense precaution. A typical installation consists of a pair of twin assembly plants, normally standing in the open where their total of 360 workers enjoy natural sunshine and fresh air.

.