Archive
Kitchen
SOMETHING A LITTLE SPECIAL (Oct, 1930)

SOMETHING A LITTLE SPECIAL

HERE’S a meal that’s going to keep them exclaiming. A most excellent dinner from —did someone say “from soup to nuts”? Nothing so commonplace, if you please. From Clam-Juice Cocktail to Floating Heart Montmorency is more like it! And in between, delicious Spaghetti Caruso, Lamb Chops Vanderbilt prepared in smartly different fashion, and a Romaine Salad fragrant with luscious fruit. A novelty menu, yet inexpensive and simple.

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Inventors’ Brain Children (Oct, 1937)

I don’t think Press-On Nails would have sold as well if they were called “artificial horn”. Of course, if you grew up watching TV in the 80′s then there really is only one brand of nails (video) worth talking about.

Inventors’ Brain Children

Many inventors vied with each other for public favor when they exhibited working or other models at the recent annual convention of the nation’s inventors, held in New York. Some of the most outstanding devices of popular interest are illustrated on the accompanying pages.

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New Appliances (Aug, 1941)

New Appliances

THIS WASHING MACHINE has a heavy-duty wringer, the drain flume of which automatically shifts when the rolls are reversed. If the roller pressure is released, it can be instantly reset.

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Give a Storybook Mother Goose Party (Oct, 1955)

Give a Storybook Mother Goose Party

Four gala parties, planned down to the last festive detail and guaranteed to show the children the time of their young lives.

THE INSTITUTE • Willie Mae Rogers, director

FOODS AND COOKERY • Dorothy B. Marsh, director

Carol Brock, hostess editor Erva Jean Vosburgh, Ellen H. Connelly, associate editors Mary Eckley, Virginia V. Voboril, assistant editors

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Kitchen Catch-All / Swiss Radar Rocket (Feb, 1952)

Kitchen Catch-All / Swiss Radar Rocket

MODERN apartments which seem to shrink in size constantly have created a demand for more compact furniture. One of the results of this demand is a cabinet (right) to hold kitchen utensils and accessories, shown at the Modern Living Exposition held in Chicago. Bonnie Schuham smiles her approval of the unit.

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Better Kitchen Methods for Modern Housewives (Apr, 1923)

Better Kitchen Methods for Modern Housewives

By using the mixer and automatic oil dropper shown above, French dressing to please the most fastidious palate is guaranteed, as the oil can be measured by the drop.

To protect fine glass and china from hard porcelain, flexible boards of soft wood are designed to fit over sink edges, on drainboards, or on the sink bottom.

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10,000 EGGS IN OMELET (Oct, 1931)

10,000 EGGS IN OMELET

What does it take to cook an omelet containing 10,000 eggs? That was the question that poultrymen of Seattle, Wash., faced, when the event was assigned a place on the program of their annual egg festival.

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Refrigeration and Your Health (Aug, 1930)

Refrigeration and Your Health

Germs, some of which are dangerous, multiply fast in temperature above 50. So test your refrigerator.

By F. G. PRYOR
Secretary, Popular Science Institute

HOW to keep food from spoiling always has been a big problem. Drying, smoking, or pickling was the way it was solved in early days, but the trouble was these methods changed the taste and characteristics of the food. Finally, it was found that by removing heat, food could be kept for a long time without losing any of its natural qualities.

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Latest Conveniences for the Household (Jul, 1934)

Latest Conveniences for the Household

DISAPPEARING CORD. The cords for electric devices, below, are wound on spring-loaded reels concealed in the wall. When not in use, the reels wind up the cords and the plugs fit snugly into holder.

AIR WHIPS CREAM Only a few seconds are needed to produce fluffy whipped cream with the utensil seen at left. An electric air compressor in the base forces millions of air bubbles through tiny openings in the stationary bottom of the bowl, as is shown below.

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Freeze as You Please (Apr, 1948)

Freeze as You Please

BY FITTING both a home freezer and a refrigerator into one cabinet, and then making one compressor operate two cooling systems, General Electric engineers have put something new on the icebox market.

The combination, labeled Model NH-8, is only 30 inches wide and 63 inches high, but its top section is a 1.5-cubic-foot freezer section, and its refrigerator compartment has a volume of 6.7 cubic feet. Each section has its “own door and temperature control, and each works independently. Frequent opening of the refrigerator puts no load on the freezer, which ordinarily is opened only a few times a day for access to frozen foods or ice cubes.

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