Archive
Kitchen
New Kitchen Built to Fit Your Wife (Sep, 1953)

New Kitchen Built to Fit Your Wife

Tall, short or medium-sized, she’s bound to save energy in this kitchen.

By Gardner Soule

BUILD the cabinets to fit the woman. Build the shelves to fit the supplies.

Build the kitchen to fit the family.

Starting with these three principles, Cornell University has re-engineered the most-used room in the house.

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CREAM-MAKER Among Newest Home Aids (Jun, 1935)

CREAM-MAKER Among Newest Home Aids

BOTTLE-HOLDER now on market enables baby to feed himself without danger of dropping the bottle. Made of aluminum, the broad circular base makes the unit secure even on uneven surfaces such as pillows. The bottle is held in a pivoted sleeve which may be tipped to almost any angle which may be needed.

MOP-HANDLE which has a flexible joint can be bent around corners, to penetrate nooks and corners otherwise hard to reach. The mop may be set at any desired angle

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MIRACLES IN SPRAY CANS (Feb, 1957)

Those mashed potatoes look pretty good, but I’m waiting for the creamed spinach in a spray can. Yum!

MIRACLES IN SPRAY CANS

Your favorite food may soon be available in push-button containers with the exciting new Polysol packing process.

By Robert G. Beason

A MADISON AVENUE advertising executive, discussing a sales campaign with a new client, shoved his chair back and said, “Charley, if you can put a push button on it you’ll make a fortune. Nobody can resist a push button.”

The ad man knew whereof he spoke. One of his other clients was a manufacturer of women’s hair lacquer. It was a good product but sales were poor —until he started packaging the lacquer in an aerosol container, a pressurized can with a push button on top. In three years’ time, sales of the lacquer increased 25-fold!

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AUTOMATIC SERVING COUNTER FOR LUNCH ROOMS (Oct, 1923)

Seems like this would be a loud place to eat, what with all the dishes sliding down chutes and all.

AUTOMATIC SERVING COUNTER FOR LUNCH ROOMS
An automatic serving-counter for lunch rooms and restaurants is intended to eliminate the need of waiters. When the customer enters a restaurant where one of these appliances is installed, he finds a clean tray, having tiny wheels, and a menu card before his seat. After checking off his order on the card, which is later used as a pay check, he places it on the tray, pushes a button, and the wheeled tray travels on a track to the kitchen. Here, the cook fills the order and sends the tray back to the counter. At the completion of the meal, when the customer rises from his seat, the tray travels again to the kitchen with the soiled dishes.

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Vej-Meat – A Vegetable Meat (Mar, 1922)

I wonder what this tasted like…

Vej-Meat
A VEGETABLE MEAT

At Last! a delicious and a perfect substitute for meat that fills the bill in every respect. Made from sun-kissed nuts, cereals and vegetable products, it looks and tastes just like meat. 50% more nutritious than meat nourishing, wholesome and appetizing. Endorsed by Doctors and Dietitians as a perfect food. Send 60c for a one pound can or $5.40 for a dozen delivered. If not thoroughly satisfactory your money will be refunded. Four flavors—Plain, Chili, Chicken and Bologna. 1 lb. can sufficient for 8 portions.

VEJ-MEAT CO., Box PC, 227 N. Manassas St., Memphis, Tenn.

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New Marvels of Food Factories (Sep, 1934)

New Marvels of Food Factories

PERMITTED to peep behind the scenes in a giant food plant, a housewife would envy the speed and exactness of the modern machines used in preparing and packing food. The variety of these error-proof automatic devices is almost endless. In bakeries, massive, yet delicately adjusted mixers weigh and sift flour and measure water, mixing enough dough for hundreds of loaves of bread in one batch and assuring uniform taste and texture. The baked loaves are brought into position before a rank of dancing hack-sawlike blades that slice them in a flash, more nearly even than the most skilful housewife could do. Huge disks, rotating under corrugated rollers, knead spaghetti dough to a uniform consistency.

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Sipper With Built-in Refrigerant (Nov, 1950)

Sipper With Built-in Refrigerant
Every swallow is chilled when drinks are sipped through a novel aluminum tube containing a sealed-in refrigerant and tipped with a Tenite plastic mouthpiece and end. The sipper is kept in the freezing compartment of the refrigerator prior to use and its contents allowed to freeze solid. There is no dilution of the beverage and the plastic mouthpiece protects lips from frostbite. It is made in several colors and is easily cleaned and dried.

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Engineering Better Meat (Feb, 1949)

Yum! Nothing makes food sound more appealing than auto industry terminology. I can’t wait to get my hands on some of that new-model 1950 beef. My mouth is watering just thinknig about it’s square streamlining and shorter wheel base!

Engineering Better Meat

Nature needs help as a hungry world calls for food. “Blueprints” drawn up by animal engineers promise to give us more meals from each animal

PLANS for the 1950-model beef critter already are on the drawing boards of the nation’s animal engineers—and never did you see such a streamlined creation!

Built with square lines, low to the ground and with shorter “wheelbase,” this advanced model will carry more T-bones and tenderloins for its weight than any animal yet to appear on American ranges.

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Iceless “Ice Box” Lowered in Ground Keeps the Food Cool (Oct, 1932)

Iceless “Ice Box” Lowered in Ground Keeps the Food Cool

A COUNTERWEIGHT on one end, and a cylindrical container on the other end of a steel rope running over two pulleys supported on a pole, makes up the major portion of an ingenious contrivance for cooling foods.

The container, shown in the accompanying photo, fits loosely into a seven-foot hole in the ground lined with a steel casing. It has three shelves, and a door closes it off from the outside. Three iron rods about four feet long run from the top of this “cooler” container to the sustaining end of the rope or cable.

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Electronic Hot Dog (Apr, 1946)

Electronic Hot Dog is the latest wrinkle as the machine at the right demonstrates. A coin inserted, a button pushed and the frankfurter is cooked by radio waves and delivered to the customer. The electronic grill will also dish out grilled cheese sandwiches and hamburgers.

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