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The Gas That Makes You Laugh (Jun, 1949)

This is a Popular Science article from 1949 which teaches budding young chemists how to make nitrous oxide. It even helpfully explains that the gas produces “a feeling of exhilaration when inhaled”.

Other articles in this series include:

  • The crystal which eliminates the need for sleep.
  • The dust that lets you lift a car.
  • The weed that makes you feed.
  • The liquid that gives you control of time and space

The Gas That Makes You Laugh

Chemists call it nitrous oxide. You can generate this and other oxides of nitrogen in a home laboratory.

By Kenneth M. Swezey

AN ACHING tooth is never tunny, but i. the dentist who yanks it out may well first put you to sleep with a few whiffs of nitrous oxide, commonly known as “laughing gas.”

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The New Attack On Venereal Disease (Jan, 1949)

Really interesting article from the 40′s about combating VD. Both in terms of medical treatment (the new wonder drug penicillin) and in terms of health education (removing the taboo from talking about VD). It’s also really interesting to see the how little has changed in regards to the balance between curing illness and “promoting sexuality”. This quote from the article:

Not all experts see this as an unmixed blessing. Dr. John Stokes, syphilologist of the University of Pennsylvania, is worried about the effect on morals. “If extramarital sexual relations,” he has said, “lead neither to significant illness nor unwanted parenthood, only a few intangibles of the spirit remain to guide children of the new era from an outmoded past into an unbridled future.”

Is very similar to this one regarding the recent HPV vaccine

“Abstinence is the best way to prevent HPV. Giving the HPV vaccine to young women could be potentially harmful because they may see it as a license to engage in premarital sex.” – Bridget Maher of the Family Research Council

The basic idea being that people should be punished for having sex outside of marriage.

The New Attack On Venereal Disease

Tent shows, hill-billies and a new drug are some of the weapons which may relegate syphilis and gonorrhea to the text-books in a few years

A carnival tent show in a Michigan State Fair (top photograph and opposite page) and a little bottle of creamy white liquid (above) are the new shock troops in a two-front war against venereal disease. Between them, they may wipe out this scourge of mankind within the next ten or twenty years.

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Machine Speeds Pretzel Bending (Aug, 1949)

Machine Speeds Pretzel Bending

THERE are more crunchy pretzels to munch when you sip long, cold drinks this summer, thanks to a new automatic pretzel-twisting machine that rolls and ties them at the rate of 50 a minute—more than twice as fast as skilled hand twisters can make them. Developed by the American Machine & Foundry Co., of New York City, the pretzel . bender is helping to meet the increased demand of pretzel lovers, who eat millions of pounds each year. On this and the following page is the story of how pretzels march from raw dough to baked twist.

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Raising Milk Goats Is Profitable New Hobby (Mar, 1939)

Friday animals for profit blogging:

Raising Milk Goats Is Profitable New Hobby

AT SYRACUSE, N.Y., a few weeks ago, men and women from all over the United States gathered in solemn conclave to discuss the joys and problems of one of the fastest-growing and strangest business-hobbies in the country— the raising of blue-blooded milk goats. It was the third annual meeting of the American Goat Society, the youngest of three American organizations devoted to goat culture and the registration of goat pedigrees.

Started thirty-odd years ago by a group of goat fanciers who imported a few pure-bred animals from Europe, pedigreed-goat raising now enrolls thousands of fans—including movie stars, farmers, business executives, and housewives. Known officially by the fancy name of capriculture, the hobby already supports three magazines devoted to goat news, three registration societies, and at least a dozen breeders’ organizations. Strange as it may seem to most Americans, who know only the smelly, comical-looking, tin-can-gnawing type of American goat, well-bred European and African milk goats are beautiful, intelligent, and affectionate creatures that remind one strongly of deer. They are scrupulously clean in their eating habits, and make excellent pets. Pure-blooded mature females, or does, bring from seventy-five dollars to $150 each, while a prize winner has brought as much as $2,000. Pedigreed bucks bring even higher prices. Bucks do smell a bit rank, even the well-bred ones, and for that reason must be kept by themselves in their own private barns or stables, but does are entirely odorless.

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Build your own JET ENGINE! (Jan, 1952)

Build your own JET ENGINE!

Order these plans today
1. Jet Propelled Bicycle, Assemble your own. Photo and instructions, $1.00
2. How to make experimental jet engines. Seven sheets drawings with information and instructions $2.95
3. Both of above in one order $3.75.
SEND NO MONEY. Order both at once $3.75 C.O.D in USA plus c.o.d postage.
Send check or Money Order and we pay postage. Get other information too. Rush Order.

J. Houston Maupin, Dept. 55, Tipp City, Ohio

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How to Choose a Geiger Counter (Jan, 1956)

Ah yes, the glorious 1950′s when choosing a Geiger counter was part of every boy’s right of passage. People may not remember their first kiss, but they sure as hell remember their first multi-tube scintillation counter.

How to Choose a Geiger Counter

Rate meter? Multitube counter? Scintillation counter? Here an expert advises you on how to buy a uranium-finding instrument.

By Griff Borgeson

HUNTING uranium with a Geiger counter is like stalking game with a well-trained hound. All of the hundred-odd kinds of uranium ore are radioactive, and hardly any other rocks are. So a counter’s ability to “see” radiation can lead straight to pay dirt.

Counters are the great equalizers of the uranium rush. Thev give a tenderfoot an even break with trained mining men. and account for rank amateurs’ successes in history’s greatest metal hunt.

You can pay from about $20 to $2,000 for a counter, and choose from dozens of models. Which will best suit your needs?

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9 Uses for Plastic Bottles (Jun, 1956)

Wow, I never would have thought of any of these uses! Thank you Popular Science! Fricking Geniuses.

9 Uses for Plastic Bottles

  • Windshield Washer
  • Quick starts in cold weather
  • For dusting models (use empty bottle)
  • Liquid soap dispenser
  • Paint sprayer
  • Oil sprayer
  • Polish applicator
  • Breakproof travel bottles
  • Glue Dispenser

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Wanted: 500,000 Men to Feed Computers (Jan, 1965)

Wanted: 500,000 Men to Feed Computers

You don’t have to be a college man to get a good job in computer programming – today even high-school grads are stepping into excellent jobs with big futures

By Stanley L. Englebardt

IF YOU know how to “talk to computers,” chances are you’ve got it made. If you don’t, you may be missing out on a great job opportunity.

People who talk to computers are called programmers. They instruct data-processing machines on how to perform specific jobs. Today there are about 40,000 of these specialists at work. In six years, experts say, 500,000 more will be needed. Many will require a bachelor’s, master’s, or even doctor’s degree. But close to 50 percent will move into this new profession with only high-school diplomas.

Here’s why there’s such a tremendous demand for programmers.

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Grip Snip (Aug, 1953)

Man, that woman gets really excited about pliers!

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Next Month… How to Choose a Geiger Counter (Dec, 1955)

Next Month… How to Choose a Geiger Counter
THINKING of buying a Geiger counter for uranium hunting? Which of the dozens that are on the market, with all kinds of gadgets and price tags, will serve you best? In the January issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, an article on how to choose a Geiger counter will offer expert advice to guide you when you go shopping. From practical experience the author, Griff Borgeson, compares the features of current models and tells which are most desirable-and why.

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