Archive
Medical
Work Capacity of Athlete Measured in Bike Test (Aug, 1938)

Work Capacity of Athlete Measured in Bike Test
How much work can an athlete turn out, and what does it cost him in oxygen consumption and heart effort? A group of Stanford University athletes has set out to measure their work-output capacity and “fuel” consumption while pedaling a test bicycle. The driving sprocket of the “bike” is connected to a dynamometer which translates leg effort into horsepower. Over the subject’s head is placed a copper helmet into which measured air is pumped, then exhausted air from the lungs is piped away to be measured for oxygen depletion and production of carbon dioxide.

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Sterility is Now Being Overcome (Jan, 1937)

Sterility is Now Being Overcome

There is new solace for empty arms as science helps the limping stork

By Lorine Pruette, Ph.D

DYNASTIES have been changed and the course of history affected by the failure of particular unions to be fruitful. Catherine the Great took a lover because of the necessity to provide the throne with an heir and introduced entirely new strains into the royal family of Russia. Henry the Eighth of England made his numerous excursions into matrimony, in part at least, out of the desire for a male heir. As a by-product of his excursions we have the break with the Catholic Church, the establishment of the Church of England and vast changes in England’s internal affairs and in her relations with the continental countries.

Henry’s children mounted the throne in succession, but all three died without heirs. Had his daughter Mary borne a child to her husband, Philip of Spain, much history might have had to be rewritten and certainly England would have been returned for a time to the bosom of the Mother Church.

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Dioxogen (Apr, 1916)

This is just Hydrogen Peroxide

Be Prepared
To stop the little hurt from growing big.

To prevent small cuts, scratches, or injuries from becoming dangerous, use Dioxogen. Perfectly safe—even children may use it. Keep Dioxogen where all the household may get it instantly. Trial bottle sent free on request, or ask for it by name at your Druggists.
The Oakland Chemical Co.
10 Astor Place, N. Y.

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Doctors Face Death TRAILING Living Poisons of MYSTERY DISEASES (Dec, 1933)

Doctors Face Death TRAILING Living Poisons of MYSTERY DISEASES

By Sterling Gleason

ACTING as human guinea pigs in the war on a mysterious disease, three courageous scientists are now working in an isolated laboratory of the United States Public Health Service. Deliberately they have exposed themselves to the bites of mosquitoes suspected of carrying epidemic sleeping sickness (encephalitis) which, at this writing, has gripped nearly a thousand persons in St. Louis. If, as they believe, these insects carry the deadly virus, they will contract a malady for which medical science has no sure remedy.

Whether the three brave experimenters recover and learn the secret of the dread disease, or succumb to a heroic death, the fight they are waging will go on. It is but one phase of a war today being fought on many fronts.

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WIN SUCCESS WITH A HANDSOME TAN (Feb, 1937)

WIN SUCCESS WITH A HANDSOME TAN

IMPROVES YOUR APPEARANCE 100%

85% of success today is due to personality and ability to influence others.
. . . according to an exhaustive study recently made at Carnegie Institute of Technology.

That pale, pasty, inefficient, indoor look is a business and social handicap. Why put yourself at such an unforgivable disadvantage when you can get that handsome, healthy TAN everybody admires so much right in your home? Within ten days, you can actually improve your appearance 100%—look like a million dollars – as if you had just returned from a vacation in Palm Beach!

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Vital Organs Cut from Body to Work Life Saving Miracles (Apr, 1933)

Vital Organs Cut from Body to Work Life Saving Miracles

Recent Operations of a Sensational Nature Are Described for You in This Article, Fifth in Our Series Dealing with Modern Surgery
By Frederic Damrau, M. D.

LIFE-SAVING by surgery, the most dramatic phase of modern medicine, now includes the removal of whole organs from the human body. This is one of the most recent daring advances in the technique of the operating room.

Miracles of this kind, performed again and again, have proved you can live without a stomach, with one of your lungs entirely removed, with a kidney gone, and even with part of your brain taken away by the surgeon’s knife!

At the famous Mayo Clinic at Rochester, Minn., two years ago, a man nearly seventy years old, had his entire stomach removed. Afterwards, he could eat anything he could before and he could digest it better.

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TOOTH ODOMETER (May, 1959)

TOOTH ODOMETER. The distance a tooth will move in your head is measured by this instrument. It was designed by researchers for health studies. It spots movement of one 200-millionth of an inch.

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Ducks Aid War on Malaria (May, 1945)

Ducks Aid War on Malaria

STRAPPED in a harness that keeps it from ambling away, a laboratory duck becomes a subject for warfare against malaria, under the direction of Dr. Morton Kahn at the Cornell University Medical School, New York City. For two hours the fowl patiently submits to bites of malaria-infected mosquitoes placed with it in a screen cage. If it contracts the malady, observers keep complete ‘charts of its daily progress and relapses. Similar in nature to human malaria, but incapable of being transmitted to man, bird malaria provides a safe and enlightening means for studying the life history of the parasite.

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Can Sex in Humans Be Changed? (Jan, 1937)

Can Sex in Humans Be Changed?

By Donald Furthman Wickets

ALL the old landmarks are going, nothing is static, everything flows. Old dreams and old nightmares become realities. Life is created in the laboratory. Sex is no longer immutable. Recently the astonishing news made the rounds that science had actually succeeded in changing the gender of two female athletes. The miracle was accomplished by surgery and duly acknowledged by law.

Mary Weston, who held (and still holds) the shotput record for women in Great Britain, is Case No. One. In 1926 Mary won the British javelin championship of her sex. “She” also, at one time or another, represented her country’s womanhood at the Olympic Games. Today, Mary Weston, now known as Mark Weston, is a young man legally and is happily married to a normal young woman. Dr. L. R. Broster, a London surgeon, certifies: “that Mark Weston, who has always been brought up as a female, is a male and should continue to live as such.” Discussing his athletic records before his transformation, Weston insists that he believed at the time that he was a woman.

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Stomach Meter Aids Study of Digestion (May, 1939)

Stomach Meter Aids Study of Digestion
Subjects who don’t amind the inconvenience of dining after having swallowed an electrode at the end of a long rubber tube, are solving mysteries of digestion at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathy. Through the tube, wires lead to an electric meter that constantly records acidity changes in the stomach. One enthusiastic volunteer actually ate his way through college; paid two dollars every time he gulped down the “antimony gastric electrode,” he also got his meals free, thus saving on his board bill.

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