Archive
Medical
GUARDING INDUSTRIAL WORKERS AGAINST Demon of Dust (Jun, 1936)

GUARDING INDUSTRIAL WORKERS AGAINST Demon of Dust

Scientific Sleuths Give an Invisible Public Enemy the Third Degree with Odd Instruments

By Walter E. Burton

N AN amazing laboratory at Pittsburgh, Pa., a group of scientific sleuths are waging a never-ending war to protect American workers everywhere from the insidious and deadly menace of industrial dusts.

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Rubber Lungs for Iron (Feb, 1938)

This is a weird picture. She’s wearing a very short skirt, heels and appears to have a deep sea diver bursting out of her stomach.

Rubber Lungs for Iron

The research laboratories of an Ohio tire company have developed a new respirator, made of rubber, which it is hoped will replace the heavy and uncomfortable “iron lung” now used in medical cases where the patient’s lung muscles have become useless through infantile paralysis or other disease.

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Dodging Death with the Public Health Service (May, 1931)

Dodging Death with the Public Health Service

by JAMES NEVIN MILLER

Day after day members of the government health service experiment with deadly germs of rare diseases to develop new medical cures, risking their lives by contracting dangerous illnesses such as tularemia and Dengue fever.

HOW would you like to be regular gardener for the queerest garden in the world, made up entirely of germ cultures of mysterious diseases, some of them so powerful that actual contact with them might snuff out your life in a couple of days?

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WHAT DRIVES MEN TO DRINK? (Sep, 1915)

The first person to say “women” in the comments gets a permanent ban.

WHAT DRIVES MEN TO DRINK?

By Lucian Cary

We’ve been told a hundred times that “Alcoholism is a disease.” We’ve acquiesced in the statement, though but vaguely understanding it, believing all the time probably that in this connection “disease” means moral weakness. Psychology, powerfully bolstering up medical science, now shows us the nature of this disease.

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Thousands of Pills for Human Ills Turned Out Each Minute by Whirling Machines (Jul, 1931)

I’m going to go out on a limb and say that all the poison ivy and bee’s stingers went into the homeopathic pills, even though the author thinks the only difference is in how hard the pills are.

Thousands of Pills for Human Ills Turned Out Each Minute by Whirling Machines

WHERE do the pills that you take for a headache or a stomach pain come from? The pictures on this page, made especially for Popular Science Monthly in a New York City pill factory, tell the story of how raw drugs are turned into finished pellets for human consumption.

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DOCTOR RESTORES “LOST VIRGINITY” (Jul, 1964)

Ignoring the actual content of the article, I would just like to point out that “more than 10,000″ is not “countless”. It’s actually a pretty specific number.

Also, read the “Report From the Future” on the second page to learn Hugo Gernsback’s plan to cure racial tension in the U.S. by turning all the black people white.

DOCTOR RESTORES “LOST VIRGINITY”

The unusual story of a doctor who has “re-created” more than 10,000 virgins.

Countless brides in Japan say they owe their happy marriage to Dr. Kohei Matsukubo, a 50-year-old plastic surgeon of Tokyo. More than 10,000 operations have been performed by this doctor to give women (including some Western women) new hymens. His story was told recently in the Canadian publication Chinatown News by Robert Metcalfe.

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WOMAN BREATHES ONLY THREE TIMES A MINUTE (Jul, 1930)

WOMAN BREATHES ONLY THREE TIMES A MINUTE

A woman who breathes only three to five times per minute has been discovered by Dr. Francis G. Benedict, of Boston. Her breathing rate is approximately one sixth that of the normal individual, who inhales and exhales about eighteen times a minute.

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EYE for an EYE (Jun, 1946)

EYE for an EYE

BY JAMES NEVIN MILLER

The story of a remarkable artificial eye – one made of plastic which matches the other and actually moves naturally with it.

I HAVE had an unforgettable A experience. While waiting for a friend in the visitors’ parlor of the National Naval Medical Center at Bethesda, Md. I got to talking with a likable young sailor. We chatted maybe ten minutes and then he left. Our conversation wasn’t important, but I noted that he wore a black patch over his left eye.

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A Simple Error in Logic – Attack on Single Payer (Oct, 1961)

It’s pretty depressing to see that the same fallacies (or even worse) are being peddled by “free-market” health care promoters today as they were 50 years ago. Comparing free health care to free haircuts would only makes sense if failing to get a haircut killed you.

A Simple Error in Logic

by John and Sylvia Jewkes

The experience of Britons with their system of socialized medicine suggests that they were the victims of an illusion.

Professor and Mrs. Jewkes have been making a study, financed by Alfred P. Sloan Jr., of the British National Health Service. They have found that the N.H.S. grew out of three main arguments: first, the British medical system before 1939 was seriously defective and nothing short of a centrally controlled free system could provide appropriate remedies; second, increased expenditure on health services would be a sound economic investment because it would increase production; and third, social justice called for identical, and the best possible, medical services for each and every citizen.

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“HOW’S THE WEATHER UP THERE?” (Nov, 1955)

“HOW’S THE WEATHER UP THERE?”

Each new generation of American males is increasing in size and puzzled anthropologists just don’t know where we’re going to end up.

By William Kelley

YOU’RE a bigger man than your father. You tower over your great-grandpa. And if your ancestor fought in the Revolutionary War, he was a runt compared to you.

All this adds up to an astonishing fact which has anthropologists puzzled and certain manufacturers scratching their heads. Slowly, but just as inevitably, American males are increasing in size with each succeeding generation.

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