Archive
Medical
HOSPITAL ON AIRSHIP MAY SWEEP PATIENTS ABOVE CLOUDS IN QUEST OF MORE SUNLIGHT (Jul, 1930)

HOSPITAL ON AIRSHIP MAY SWEEP PATIENTS ABOVE CLOUDS IN QUEST OF MORE SUNLIGHT

For persons suffering with tuberculosis, or just from nerves, will physicians soon prescribe a trip to the clouds in a flying clinic instead of a visit to the mountains?

Not long ago Charles L. Julliot, French lawyer, proposed that airplanes or dirigibles transport such patients above the clouds. His suggestion, which America hears was approved by the medical faculties of France, called attention to the fact that high altitude and sunshine produce well-known changes in the blood, in many cases beneficial.

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Comfortable Dentist Chair Minimizes Patient’s Fears (Mar, 1932)

Comfortable Dentist Chair Minimizes Patient’s Fears

NO MATTER how comfortable patients are made to feel, they will always approach a dentist’s office with some trepidation. There is good reason for this, for once in a dentist’s chair, you have to take what comes and you can’t fight back.

Taking account of the patient’s deep-seated fear, dentists are now doing as much as possible to relieve the situation. Their latest efforts have resulted in the creation of a chair which has about every possible comfort for the victims.

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Crutch for Paralyzed Eyelids (Mar, 1932)

Wouldn’t the eye dry out?

Crutch for Paralyzed Eyelids

An eyelid crutch for use in cases of a paralysis of the eyelids, leading to a complete or partial loss of sight, has been developed by Dr. John C. Neill of the Pennsylvania State College of Optometry. The crutch consists of a thin gold half wire loop fitted to the contour of the patient’s eyes and welded to the nose piece of the glasses.

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UNMASKED: THE GREAT REDUCING PILL GYP! (Feb, 1958)

UNMASKED: THE GREAT REDUCING PILL GYP!

Doctors warn that “the most widely promoted medical fraud of today” is a “menace to public health”

BY JAMES SHAWCROSS

STEVE ALLEN, video’s versatile funnyman, can be mighty witty on the screen and he can also be a dud at times. But the worst egg he ever laid wasn’t on TV. He did it, with an assist from his beauteous missus, in a so-called “paid endorsement,” lending his famous name to plug an infamous product, a spurious “reducing candy.”

According to a high-priced, nationwide ad that starred the famous couple, “Mr. and Mrs. Steve Allen lose weight together with AYDS!… Jayne: ‘And lose weight automatically!’ . . . Steve: ‘Triple check!’”

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Giant Molecules: the Machinery of Inheritance (Jun, 1938)

Giant Molecules: the Machinery of Inheritance

How Genetics, Youthful Science of Inheritance, Has produced Billions of Dollars of Wealth . . . Big Things that Boil Down to the Minutest Controls.

By BARCLAY MOON NEWMAN

THE remarkable discoveries in the youthful science of inheritance, genetics, have been applied to animal and plant breeding throughout civilization—and with almost incredible success. As regards the United States alone, during the past 30 years, even a conservative estimate of the cash value of the practical application of genetic findings would have to run into billions of dollars. Far greater yields of grains, fruits, vegetables, and cotton; far higher quality both in domestic plants and domestic animals of every description and their products, including milk, meat, eggs, and wool; increased and sometimes perfect resistance to disease; entirely new commercial varieties; and the lessening of the chances of famine: all these are in this story of science.

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Hunger Measured by Balloons (Dec, 1929)

Well, that sounds unpleasant.

Hunger Measured by Balloons

SWALLOWING small rubber balloons after fasting from 15 to 44 hours, and then causing intense pangs of hunger by taking an insulin injection, sound like making a martyr of oneself for science. Yet this is the program submitted to by a number of men in the laboratory of Prof. A. J. Carlson and Dr. P. Quigley, of the University of Chicago. The insubstantial meal of balloons was taken so that the movements of the digestive tract might be measured. The rubber bubbles were connected with the outside world by means of slender tubes, to which instruments were attached for the measurement of changes of pressure in the balloons caused by contractions of the stomach and intestine.

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Crooks Cured by Surgeons Knife (Jul, 1930)

This is pretty terrifying, though I suppose it is just a much cruder form of how we use psychiatric drugs today.

A few things I noticed:
1. obviously being gay is a disorder.
2. they didn’t say if the prisoners were actually given any choice about their operations.
3. what did they do to the kids?
4. This quote
“It points also to the more illuminating truth that if the grandparents, or even the parents, of these men had been given proper medical and surgical treatment for their own glandular abnormalities, their children and their grandchildren would not have offended society…”
sounds like Lamarckism. Though according to Wikipedia that theory seems to be making a comeback.
5. Apparently you can tell a criminal by their face. From the pictures in the article that seems to mean “Foreign Looking”.

Crooks Cured by Surgeons Knife

Here for the first time is the amazing story of how criminals in San Quentin prison, California, are made honest by giving them healthy glands.

By H. H. DUNN

THE surgeon’s knife and the laboratory test tube have entered the campaign against crime. Experimental researches, carried on over a number of years and beginning to show results in control and reform institutions this summer, indicate that criminal tendencies may be eradicated, development of the criminal averted, and the established criminal restored to normal by medical and surgical treatment.

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HOSPITAL ON AIRSHIP MAY SWEEP PATIENTS ABOVE CLOUDS IN QUEST OF MORE SUNLIGHT (Jul, 1930)

HOSPITAL ON AIRSHIP MAY SWEEP PATIENTS ABOVE CLOUDS IN QUEST OF MORE SUNLIGHT

For persons suffering with tuberculosis, or just from nerves, will physicians soon prescribe a trip to the clouds in a flying clinic instead of a visit to the mountains?

Not long ago Charles L. Julliot, French lawyer, proposed that airplanes or dirigibles transport such patients above the clouds. His suggestion, which America hears was approved by the medical faculties of France, called attention to the fact that high altitude and sunshine produce well-known changes in the blood, in many cases beneficial. Add to this the natural exhilaration of an air trip, he says, and the effect might be even better than that of a mountain vacation (P. S. M., Mar. ’30, p. 34).

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Operating Room Goes to Battle in Tank-Towed Armored Trailer (Oct, 1941)

Operating Room Goes to Battle in Tank-Towed Armored Trailer

TOWED into battle by a war tank, an armored operating room for front-line casualties has been designed by C. J. Birtcher, a Los Angeles, Calif., manufacturer of surgical instruments. Emplacements cut in a hillside by bulldozers would hide such trailers from enemy view.

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Yale Scientists Trace Cancer To Body Electricity (Dec, 1936)

Yale Scientists Trace Cancer To Body Electricity

Electrical changes in the human body may explain the cause of cancer according to Prof. H. S. Burr, of the Yale School of Medicine. Working with Dr. R. G. Meader, Prof. Burr has found that minute changes in the living process are accompanied by changes in body electricity.

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