Archive
Photography
Adventuring with the Most Famous Aerial Photographer (Mar, 1930)

Adventuring with the Most Famous Aerial Photographer

Captain Albert W. Stevens of the U. S. Army has won the description of “the world’s greatest aerial photographer” through his remarkable photos taken from high altitudes. His is a thrilling business with a great deal more excitement in it than usually falls to the lot of a photographer. Several of his more thrilling adventures are recounted here.

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Giant Six-Ton Camera “Drafts” Aircraft (Feb, 1946)

Giant Six-Ton Camera “Drafts” Aircraft

CAMERAS and photography are playing a greater part in modern industry than most people realize. Airplanes, born on the engineer’s drafting board, virtually are nursed through adolescence in the photographic darkroom. Like dressmaking, the building of an airplane requires a full-size pattern— called a template—for each individual part.

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PHOTOMATIC the first machine to make photography simple, inexpensive — and PROFITABLE TO YOU! (Nov, 1936)

PHOTOMATIC the first machine to make photography simple, inexpensive — and PROFITABLE TO YOU!

Out of every 10c put in the Photomatic 4-1/2c goes into your pocket.

No Photography Experience Necessary

The customer inserts a dime—the Photomatic does the work. It produces a metal-framed, fade-proof, perfect picture, in less than one minute. The photograph has the cameo-like detail heretofore possible only in expensive, professional photographs.

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“Hold That Pose”—Laddie Takes a Try at Photography (Aug, 1929)

“Hold That Pose”—Laddie Takes a Try at Photography

“STEADY, now—there!” That’s probably what this canine photographer shown above is telling Pussy as she is getting her picture taken for the family album. They are the best of friends and have long since disregarded the conventional “greeting” that usually ensues when a dog sights a cat. In fact, Laddie has championed her cause so many times it’s getting to be a habit. Pussy is having difficulty in holding the pose, for a mouse is in the offing. And who cares about a picture at such a time?

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25 Men Died to Film these War Movies! (May, 1929)

25 Men Died to Film these War Movies!

ONE hundred motion picture cameramen, officially assigned by the imperial German government of the ex-kaiser to film German troops in action during the great war, were required to take the remarkable war scenes now being shown in theaters throughout the country under the title, “Behind the German Lines.”

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Cameras go round in circles to take pictures for two fairs (Apr, 1964)

Cameras go round in circles to take pictures for two fairs

Photographers are being kept busy shooting exhibits. Movies filmed in New York will tell the city’s story in a circular theater at the New York World’s Fair. Color slides of Alpine scenes will cover an entire dome at Lausanne’s National Exhibition.

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CAMERA STUDIES BY SELF-STYLED SONS OF HEAVEN (Aug, 1945)

Wow, this is just about the most grim camera ad I’ve ever seen.

CAMERA STUDIES BY SELF-STYLED SONS OF HEAVEN

“American prisoners carry their wounded in blankets on death march from Bataan. Practical Japanese give wounded comrades hand grenades for honorable suicide.”

“Chinese captive granted extra moment of life, but only while noble son of Nippon holds heroic pose for snapshot to delight honorable folks back home.”

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INFRA-RED PHOTOS SHOW VEIN DISEASE (Jul, 1934)

With infra-red digital video cameras, computer processing and projectors this tech works amazingly well. Check out this video of the Vein Viewer (Warning: the link goes to a video that shows a person getting an injection and there is a small amount of blood. I know this freaks some people out.)

INFRA-RED PHOTOS SHOW VEIN DISEASE

Varicose veins and other conditions that interfere with the circulation can be detected with comparative ease by a method of photographic diagnosis recently demonstrated at Rochester, New York. Human skin, it was discovered, is nearly transparent to infra-red rays. By using film that was sensitive to this invisible light, photographs were taken in which veins lying just below the surface of the skin stood out clearly. Any derangement was readily apparent in the photographs.

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MAKE TALKING MOVIE OF LATEST ECLIPSE (Aug, 1930)

This is actually rather clever.

MAKE TALKING MOVIE OF LATEST ECLIPSE

“Talking movies” recorded the latest total eclipse of the sun from an Army airplane over Claremont Field, Calif. Never before had this been done.

The definite scientific object of the feat was to determine, more accurately than could be done with stop watches, the exact moment of each phase of the eclipse.

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The Day of His Going (Apr, 1918)

That’s kind of interesting. It’s manual time-stamping and tagging for photos.

The Day of His Going

In a million homes, pictures are keeping the story of the war as it touches those homes. John in his first khaki as he proudly marched away, and John, tanned and hardened, as he looked when home on leave.

More than ever the Kodak Album is keeping the home story. To-day that story means history, and more than ever it is important that it be authentic history—that every negative bear a date.

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